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Author Topic: Rollwagen no. 28 of the Plettenberger Kleinbahn in 1/22.5 scale  (Read 44194 times)
Juke Joint
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« Reply #45 on: January 23, 2015, 08:13:48 PM »

Doesn't matter for one wageon, but with 44 axles or 88 bearings this starts to dwindle into real work

Fettling Builds Character ! Super job on these parts!

Philip
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #46 on: February 19, 2015, 01:45:44 PM »

Thanks for your posts!

With slightly more material and no more effort you could have built 1:1 scale components and then earned money by using them to transport goods on a nearby railroad! The modeling is most satisfactory. -- Russ

I'm afraid you're right, Russ. I merely wouldn't know how to take it down the stairs.

There's a problem in resistance soldering steel parts. It tends to burn holes into the material when high power is necessary. You can see this here, where I tried to solder those little brass angle sections into the steel frame.








I started a request at buntbahn about what I've done wrong but nobody seems to know the answer. So I went back to my good old flambť torch. The brass part lies on a aluminum padding and is fixed with a clamp for soldering.





Looks better than resistance soldering in that case ...





Frithjof provided more parts (three different kinds of angle sections) for assembly of the weighbeams.








That are a lot of M 0.8 screws ... Is there something apparent to you at the next pictures?








Cheers,
Volker
« Last Edit: February 19, 2015, 01:54:22 PM by Hydrostat » Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
finescalerr
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« Reply #47 on: February 19, 2015, 01:48:53 PM »

I would have suggested a torch and I'm glad it worked out; the solder joints are beautiful. So is the rest of the assembly. -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #48 on: February 19, 2015, 02:31:51 PM »

Such precise work!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

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Marcel Ackle
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« Reply #49 on: February 26, 2015, 04:29:35 PM »

Volker, amazing work!

Marcel
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #50 on: April 27, 2015, 11:35:28 AM »

Thanks, Russ, Ray and Marcel.

Frithjof meanwhile milled the pivot block. The pivots were provided by Helmut; I just asked him to cut some tubing to make them myself from some additional screws, nuts and washers and what I got were the completed items ... Thanks, Helmut!








Underneath it looks that way. About the 4 bore holes: there's a square panel to come.





Upside the pivot protrudes the crossmember





and then fits in to the bogie ball joint. The binder pendulums protrude into the notches





and are fixed with special bolts at the lower pedestals.





It's taking shape. Slowly  Cheesy.





Cheers,
Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Peter_T1958
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« Reply #51 on: April 27, 2015, 11:59:20 AM »

I can imagine, it must be a great pleasure when you don't have to hold back and you are able to select only the best solutions for your project. This is absolut professional engineering on the the highest levels.

Speechless,
Peter
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #52 on: April 27, 2015, 12:45:12 PM »

Superurb design and execution.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #53 on: April 27, 2015, 01:05:50 PM »

I enthusiastically agree with both posts above. -- Russ
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #54 on: April 27, 2015, 03:23:05 PM »

volker
really lovelly work that you and the master frithjof are producing.the quality is first rate your effort is really showing
kind regards kim
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #55 on: April 27, 2015, 04:16:24 PM »

Marvelous work!
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EZnKY
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« Reply #56 on: April 27, 2015, 05:15:43 PM »

Wow.  Just wow.
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Eric Zabilka
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« Reply #57 on: May 04, 2015, 12:38:30 AM »

Simply stunning, (as always)....a true work of industrial art.
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M-Works
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« Reply #58 on: May 06, 2015, 11:45:09 AM »

Thanks, Peter, Bill, Russ, Kim, Ray, Eric and Marc.

I can imagine, it must be a great pleasure when you don't have to hold back and you are able to select only the best solutions for your project.

Yes, Peter it is. I'm really glad that I have Frithjof (not to mention the other guys more or less involved here) as a friend. Even to this day after it turned out how much work this project means for him and his mill  Shocked. I wouldn't be able to build at this standard without support with those machined parts.

About the seats: They were exposed to weather all the year and I would like to ask you for your opinions concerning my coloring.

Frithjof provided them milled from beech wood. With the triangular scraper's tip I added vertical joints to the milled longitudinal ones. Left hand the milled item, right hand carved.



After watering for a few minutes the parts are stained with thin Gouache. Left hand a mixture of black, umber and opaque white, right hand only black. The grain unbends because of the water, resulting in a much coarser surface.



Then I sprayed the parts with some gray Tamiya color unevenly and added some additional color humps with a brush. Rubbing/sanding the dry parts on a paper sheet smoothens the humps. I think this works well at the right part for a stressed and often painted wooden part. At the left one the surface is to uneven. Next time I'll sand the parts before the gray coloring.







Any suggestions?


Cheers,
Volker
« Last Edit: May 06, 2015, 12:19:18 PM by Hydrostat » Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
finescalerr
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« Reply #59 on: May 06, 2015, 12:24:54 PM »

From an artistic standpoint I like the three on the left and especially the two in the middle. But the appearance of natural weathering sometimes can be "disappointing" so the seat on the far right seems very real somehow. -- Russ
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