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Author Topic: Wooden ore cars  (Read 135787 times)
Hauk
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« Reply #255 on: January 22, 2017, 01:06:47 PM »

Thanks for all the encouragement, folks!

Since last post I have spent a lot of time thinking about how to finish the underframes. Paint or blackening, or both?

I tried to blacken one of the underframes a while back, but the result was a major disaster. In fact, it was so bad that I did not want to post anything about it, was too depressing. Long story short, the combination of several rounds in a ultrasonic cleaner and long baths in blackening etched away a lot of the solder joints, and I had to to some serious repair work that took an awful lot of time.

So it took some time to build up the courage to have another go.

I decided to use a procedure like this:

1. 5 minutes in the ultrasonic cleaner. Used some industrial grade detergent to ensure a squeaky clean model

2. Brush on full strength Birchwood Casey blackening solution, working vigorously with the brush to prevent crud build-up. Rinse with water every know and then to control the process.

3. When happy with the color, rinse with lots of water.

4. Dunk in neutralizing bath, I used a weak Caustic Soda solution.

5. Rinse with lots and lots of water.

This worked out pretty well. I was especially happy that 5 minutes in the ultrasonic cleaner was enough to get the metal clean enough to make the blackening take. There is a lot of nooks and crannies on the model that is impossible to clean mechanically.

But I got a lot of white crud on the solder joints, which I suspect is a result of the Caustic soda. So perhaps the solution was too strong, and that washing soda might have been a better choice. If anyone with real chemistry skills could educate me on the proper way to neutralize a blackening solution, I would be very happy! I am dead sure that it is vital to neutralize the acids in the blackening. I have for instance blackened brass screws without proper neutralizing, and after just a couple of years they were very brittle and broke when I tried to loosen them.

As my wife was away for the weekend, I could play in the kitchen with my potions. The advantage was access to water. The drawback was that the lighting was not as good as in the workshop, so I misjudged the color of the blackening a bit. In better light i found that I would have prefered them to be a bit darker. But I think it might OK after weathering is applied.

Take a look for yourself and let me know what you think. I trust you to be honest!


 

 

 

 


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finescalerr
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« Reply #256 on: January 22, 2017, 03:19:41 PM »

To my eye, the finish looks excellent. A new car might look okay with things as they are. If not, the metal blackening seems an ideal starting point for weathering. I would consider your experiment a success. -- Russ
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Hauk
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« Reply #257 on: January 22, 2017, 04:30:02 PM »

To my eye, the finish looks excellent. A new car might look okay with things as they are. If not, the metal blackening seems an ideal starting point for weathering. I would consider your experiment a success. -- Russ

Thanks, Russ!
The cars will be  rather heavily weathered, they are intended to show about  18-20 yrs of service.
But I would like the metal to show through, I kind of like that after the blackening you still can see that the underframes are made of metal. I dont know if it really is prototypical, but why not allow for a little impressionism?
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Bill Gill
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« Reply #258 on: January 22, 2017, 05:13:50 PM »

I agree with Russ that as is in the photos looks good for new cars, and the blackening is a good start for the heavier weathering you plan to do, Very nice work. Must have been frustrating to have the earlier solder joint deteriorate after the ultrasonic cleaning and slackening, but your recovery hides all traces of the problem, so well done.
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #259 on: January 22, 2017, 08:25:45 PM »

I have to agree with the others. The blackening looks good already and with a bit of weathering should be just right.
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« Reply #260 on: January 23, 2017, 02:17:18 PM »

Hauk,

I do agree, too. That's a good base for things to come. If you ever have an opportunity to try gravoxide: This leaves behind rather matte stains, but I never rinsed or cleaned the parts that intense as you did afterwards. Instead of an ultrasonic cleaner you may use an old electrical tooth brush and some scouring powder to clean the parts? Additionally I cook the parts some minutes in water with detergent, to get rid of oil/fat stains. The brass castings might still look a bit too much like brass at this stage? Maybe tinning the couplers and blackening them with some tiffany supply may be useful to avoid brass shining through when they are put into service.

Cheers,
Volker
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« Reply #261 on: February 13, 2017, 03:45:17 PM »

A little progress. The lettering on the wagons were added with the help of etched stencils:





Some weathering, a few details more, final assembly and the job is finally done.
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

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« Reply #262 on: February 13, 2017, 04:44:08 PM »

They look fantastic Hauk!
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #263 on: February 13, 2017, 05:26:16 PM »

These are just so beautiful. A lot of delicate work that is paying off. Those stencils are great!
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #264 on: February 13, 2017, 07:46:00 PM »

Fantastic! So much fine, delicate detail!
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finescalerr
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« Reply #265 on: February 14, 2017, 02:47:31 AM »

I can only agree with the other guys. Simply terrific modeling and very inspirational. -- Russ
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #266 on: February 14, 2017, 06:42:53 AM »

Hauk, These are excellently built and wonderful to look at.
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« Reply #267 on: February 14, 2017, 07:07:50 AM »

I think I might like to build one of those "folgevogn_svertet" cars!
Would look great in 1/16th scale! Grin

-Marty
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #268 on: February 14, 2017, 08:18:34 AM »

Great modeling.  The coloring and details perfect.

Jerry
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« Reply #269 on: February 14, 2017, 08:35:03 AM »

I think I might like to build one of those "folgevogn_svertet" cars!
Would look great in 1/16th scale! Grin

-Marty

I can send you a set of 1/16 drawings any day!

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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
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