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Author Topic: Wooden ore cars  (Read 76741 times)
Hydrostat
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« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2014, 02:05:54 AM »

Simply: Wow!

What sort of wood is that?

Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
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« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2014, 02:32:53 AM »

Simply: Wow!

What sort of wood is that?

Volker

Thanks for all the interest in my little experiment!

The wood is regular Kappler H0 scale 4X12. Actual dimension is around 1,2mm X 3,5mm.

I would have prefered a somewhat harder wood with less grain. I have used birch with great results on some other projects. Perhaps it is time to get a Byrnes table saw and start ripping my own stripwood.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2014, 03:34:22 AM »

You are truly a craftsman. Most satisfactory. -- Russ
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2014, 04:09:44 AM »

Thanks, Hauk, I've read the "Kappler" - but what kind of wood/tree is it?

Volker
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« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2014, 04:12:48 AM »

Thanks, Hauk, I've read the "Kappler" - but what kind of wood/tree is it?

Volker

To my knowledge it is American Basswood.
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greenie
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« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2014, 05:57:20 AM »

If anybody is interested in an excellent wood that has virtually NO grain, then look no further than any of the different species of MYRTLE.

You can sand it to an excellent finish before painting, you can turn it, drill it, carve it, even use a Dremel with a dentists bur and the wood stays together, no splintering or cracking.

You have to do something really bad to destroy this stuff, it is a hard wood, but it's one of the softer varieties of the hard wood family.

The worst that I can do to it, is if  I let my fingernails grow too long and when you squeeze the timber to hold onto it while attacking it with a file, then you can leave fingernail marks in the surface.

So instead of using any timber that has a god awful grain in it, go try this stuff -------------- MYRTLE, --- you will be amazed Roll Eyes Roll Eyes

regards  greenie 
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finescalerr
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« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2014, 01:40:21 PM »

Richard Christ introduced me to Swiss Pear several years ago. I think it's qualities would be quite similar to those of Myrtle but it may be slightly softer. -- Russ
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« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2014, 03:51:48 PM »

I have a lemon-scented myrtle tree in the front yard. Its only about 4 metres high at the moment so it won't get chopped any time soon to make models!
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
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« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2014, 04:42:56 PM »

Hauk,
Beautiful machine work!!!

Greenie,
Where do we find myrtle?

-Mj
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2014, 07:13:22 PM »

Hauk,
Beautiful machine work!!!

Greenie,
Where do we find myrtle?  http://www.realoregongift.com/Craftsman_Hobbyists_/craftsman_hobbyists_.html
Also sent you an email!!!!

-Mj

Jerry
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« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2014, 09:52:50 PM »

Once you get the Byrnes Saw, you'll wonder why you waited so long.  Get the micrometer attachment and 0" clearance insets at the same time and your model making will advance quickly.  With practice you can repeat almost all of the same things you can do on a large saw on it.  My only wish is that mine was able to take a dado head.

Victor Machine in NYC (http://www.victornet.com/index.html) has very affordable metal cutting blades which fit it as well as a broad supply of metal working tools which are quite useful.
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greenie
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« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2014, 10:07:20 PM »


Greenie,
Where do we find myrtle?  http://www.realoregongift.com/Craftsman_Hobbyists_/craftsman_hobbyists_.html
Also sent you an email!!!!

-Mj

Jerry
[/quote]

Sorry Jerry, wrong type/species of tree.

Here's the one I use --------  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothofagus_cunninghamii
                              --------  http://www.tastimber.tas.gov.au/SpeciesDetailsGeneral.aspx?SpeciesID=4
                              --------  http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/tasmanian-myrtle/
                              --------  https://www.google.com.au/search?q=tasmanian+myrtle&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=5gwMU7eYDoePlQXt4YCoBw&ved=0CCwQsAQ&biw=1823&bih=986

As you can see, it has virtually NO ugly out of scale pores in the surface, it can be used from 1/12th scale, all the way down to 1/75th, and still look as if it's true to scale.
I do not know of any other wood species, that has this marvellous property. If trying to use Oak for 1/35th scale, then the open pores in the timber make it look ridiculous and way out of scale.
This stuff does not have pores that look ridiculous, in any scale.

Here's where I acquire my supplies from,

                              --------  http://www.brittontimbers.com.au/timbers
                              --------  http://www.brittontimbers.com.au/timber/tasmanian-myrtle

It is called Beech Myrtle or Myrtle Beech as well, not sure of what species of this type of timber that you would have in the Northern Hemisphere.

It's used for furniture mainly, sometimes for flooring, but to me it's a bit soft for flooring as it will mark, can't imagine what a polished floor would look like, after a set of stiletto heels had been across/over it. Shocked

If anybody has a Wholesale Timber merchant nearby, then possibly go have a chat with some knowledgable person who works there, it might be the way to go. Roll Eyes

I buy it in 6 foot lengths of 8 x 3 inches and ask them to check out the grain so it's all straight, both ways. I have to pay a tad extra for this service, but I don't waste as much by trying to chase the grain on my bandsaw. I rough it out to a bit oversize and then shove it through a thickness sander I made specially for the job. You can keep shoving the timber through the sander and eventually get it down to about 0.010", so thin you can hold it up to the light and see through it.
I'm sold on this stuff and it's all I use. Grin


regards  greenie
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2014, 12:15:34 PM »

Here are a couple sites in the US that sell "Tasmanian rose (or pink) myrtle"

http://www.woodworkerssource.com/myrtle_tasmanian.html

http://www.hearnehardwoods.com/hardwoods/exotic_hardwoods/exotic_wood/tasmanian_rose_myrtle_lumber/tasmanian_rose_myrtle_wood.html

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« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2014, 05:23:38 PM »

Some progress on the cars. The big hurdle to overcome is the etching artwork for all the metal parts. These are to be etched in nickle-silver. Not the most interesting image posted on this forum, but the screendump might give an idea on how I plan to lay out the parts:



By the way, the actual artwork will consists of two drawings, one for the front and one for the back. On the films they will be all black, the grey fill with black countours is just my "working colors".
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2014, 06:02:04 AM »

Hauk,

are you going to rearrange the items to save space / material?

Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
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