Westlake Publishing Forums
April 20, 2019, 04:32:18 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Wood Species for Model Realism  (Read 19681 times)
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5295


« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2008, 01:35:16 PM »

"Peachy keen"? Really, now! But how about a photo, John? -- Russ
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2008, 07:34:12 PM »

Here you go Unc! This is the car the wind was blowing away as I tried to photograph it.

John


* PNG gon 2.jpg (120.42 KB, 300x200 - viewed 569 times.)
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2008, 07:41:42 PM »

This is a Phil's Narrow Gauge kit with lots of extra detail. The couplers are Accucraft heads with shanks and boxes I machined from brass. The striker plates on the coupler are also machined from brass as is the spool on the brake staff. You will notice the glad hand is missing as the patterns were sent to Dave at Ozark and I'm awaiting the first test pulls from the spin caster. On the detail level, they are up to the Hartford ones except cleaned up and a bit stronger.

John


* PNG gon end.jpg (100.15 KB, 300x200 - viewed 549 times.)
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2008, 07:48:30 PM »

Here you can start to see the knot holes. More so on the inside than outside. The paint is Chuck's technique of thinner and tape to chip it. Not quite as much chipping but it does work well. I did find that it worked best to weather the wood before I drilled and glued in the knot holes as the glue (CA) tends to restrict the penetration of the Silverwood thereby making discolored splotches around them.

John


* PNG gon truck.jpg (108.56 KB, 300x200 - viewed 553 times.)
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2008, 07:55:23 PM »

Here you can see more detail parts. The brake cylinder/tank is from a brass pattern I machined. Bob Uniack has then made test samples seen here from resin. The master has now gone to Ozark to upgrade the level of their 1/20.3 cars. The brake levers are all brass sheet and the clevises are from brass strip and tubing. The turn buckles were turned from brass rod.

John


* PNG gon brakes.jpg (116.69 KB, 300x200 - viewed 576 times.)
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2008, 07:58:45 PM »

Last and certainly least is an attempt to show more of the wood detail. These things got really beat up. We have pictures that make this car look positively new.

John


* PNG gon inside.jpg (94.39 KB, 300x200 - viewed 540 times.)
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2008, 12:35:02 AM »

Wow.....well it certainly looks beautiful, and the machining and custom work you put into it sounds fascinating....I wish the images were larger than 300pix wide...say 600 or so, so one could better see the detail and work you did.

Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5295


« Reply #22 on: October 23, 2008, 02:15:35 AM »

Nice work, John! I agree with Marc: Please try to attach larger photos. I'd love to see your work more clearly. -- Russ
Logged
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 743


« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2008, 03:09:17 AM »

Very nice work, John

Gordon Birrell
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2008, 08:42:50 AM »

I spent a lot of time getting the pictures down to the required size. That was as big as the web site would accept without using compression. When I used compression, all I got was complaints of lost detail. If you can tell me how to post 600 pictures without compression, I would be glad to do it.

John
Logged
TRAINS1941
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1272


« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2008, 09:40:36 AM »

John

That is some very nice work.  Great detail and weathering.

Jerry
Logged

Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2008, 05:22:13 PM »

Here we go. This is a test of another picture of the gondola. This time I made it 600 pixels wide and used medium compression. Let's see how it works.

John


* PNG gon test.jpg (77.88 KB, 600x400 - viewed 571 times.)
Logged
michael mott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 511


« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2009, 12:27:25 AM »

Hello I am new here, Hi Russ, I thought that I might make a comment about the scale wood. I spend a fair bit of time scrounging around the lumber yards looking at the cedar fence boards. One can often find some boards that have extremely tight grain that are often discarded because they don't match the rest of the open grain boards these can be resawn and are very good for modelwork this beam is made from some tight grained cedar.

regards Michael


* IMG_4552x800.jpg (99.18 KB, 800x600 - viewed 490 times.)
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5295


« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2009, 03:05:26 AM »

Very effective. Thanks, Mike. -- Russ
Logged
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2009, 04:37:40 PM »

I'd like to see and hear more about whats behind that pilot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked
-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!