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Author Topic: Weathered Wood  (Read 34084 times)
k27rgs
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« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2008, 07:07:42 AM »

The paper bucket, roofing and cobblestones......

 absolutely brilliant  !!!!!!!

    The cobblestones, look like one of Marc's building site projects

 regards

   "M"

    www.modvid.com.au

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Belg
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« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2008, 03:00:33 PM »

Guys, when working on the glass with the plans underneath isn't there some distortion/magnification issues from the glass itself? I have some 1/2 or 3/8 tempered pieces I could use if that not the case. Thanks Pat
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lenelg
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« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2008, 12:16:34 AM »

Guys, when working on the glass with the plans underneath isn't there some distortion/magnification issues from the glass itself?

Since you are dealing with quality flat glass, distortion/magnification should not be an issue. The main problem would be parallax error, i. e. the thickness of the glass puts distance between the plans and your project, so you need to view things from a consistent angle, or your project will move relative to the plans..

Lennart Elg
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2008, 02:09:26 AM »

Maybe I'm wierd...but I do one of three things (depending on how lazy I am and what will work best for the project) when building anything.

1.  I draw my drawings in CAD and print them out to the exact scale. I then use 3M #77 spray adhesive and mount them on a smooth piece of matte-board, or on a piece of foam-core board.  I then use scrap pieces of stripwood and glue it down where I need/deem, in a type of jig and/or stops, to ensure exact alignment. Then when I just use a very minimal amout of yellow carpenters glue, so that none will seep out when the joint is assembled/compressed.

2. I build a jig out of styrene (on styrene sheet), based upon the dimensions needed. Then use the same gluing approach as above.

3. I build a temp jig using styrene or wood, using double sided tape, on whatever I have at hand: glass, steel machining plate, my cutting matt, piece of masonite etc.......

.......another thing I quite frequently use on smaller projects is using pushed into place steel blocks and a steel surface, to create a "square" two sides to work against, I then place the first side and end, and then use "spacer blocks/strips" to space/add consecutive parallel members.....always using machinists squares to make sure it's staying in square, and an additional block to add compression on joints..

I guess what I am getting at here is .....jig.....and not so much glue that it seeps out.


Marc
« Last Edit: July 03, 2008, 02:12:04 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #34 on: July 03, 2008, 05:03:23 AM »

Marc, I have done pretty much all three of those methods, I've attached a few shots of different ones I've made and used. I would like to add in the first pic I used foamcore and used straight pins pushed into the foam as stops to build a deck, I also used the pins to hold the joist upright and aligned. Then when I started laying on the decking material I removed the pins as I glued them down. Worked great for me. Pat

parallax error this is the $10 dollar word I could not remember when I was trying to make my point above, thanks Lennart for coming up with that.

One more quick question, why is it when I hit preview the pics don't show??


* DSCN2342.JPG (64.72 KB, 535x400 - viewed 781 times.)

* jig2.JPG (18.2 KB, 400x242 - viewed 755 times.)

* jig1.JPG (20.18 KB, 400x302 - viewed 736 times.)
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #35 on: July 03, 2008, 01:52:09 PM »

Pat....

Exactly what I was getting at.  I guess I don't see/understand the need for the glass Undecided...if you build "clean" there should be no, or at most minimal, glue seepage....but I guess that's just me bing cantankerous Roll Eyes Grin


The reason the pics don't show in preview, is because the post/text and photo files have not been uploaded (posted) to the site/forum.....it is merely a preview of the text, formatting and any html effects (IE. Bold, color, etc.).

Marc
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chester
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« Reply #36 on: July 03, 2008, 03:39:21 PM »

The only reason I use glass is to be able to view the grid under so I keep square and/or parallel. A jig would be suitable for much of that but I often have to build jigs for my work and don't want my modeling efforts to feel too much like my work.
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Younger
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« Reply #37 on: July 11, 2008, 03:13:51 PM »

Here are a couple of pics of simple jigs I constructed out of styrene scrap, in this case for the belfry of the Calico Fire House I'm building in 1/48.
-Younger


* Belfry jig.jpg (38.89 KB, 550x440 - viewed 777 times.)

* Belfry jig 1.jpg (38.28 KB, 550x426 - viewed 730 times.)
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-Younger
jacq01
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« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2008, 02:51:55 PM »


  Marc, Pat,

   
Quote
Exactly what I was getting at.  I guess I don't see/understand the need for the glass Undecided...if you build "clean" there should be no, or at most minimal, glue seepage....but I guess that's just me bing cantankerous Roll Eyes Grin

  I only use a glass plate  (under the drwg!!!)  when I need a flat part, which I use as measurement base
  on the model. Glue seepage Huh?? I apply most glue on wooden models with a sewing pin.

  Jacq
   
 
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myron
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« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2008, 06:37:21 PM »

Younger,

That is really neat.  Is this a kit or scratchbuilt?


Myron
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Younger
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« Reply #40 on: July 15, 2008, 07:28:56 AM »

I'm scratching it in 1/48 from an old Al Armitage plan set. The bldg was unpainted wood, with white windows. I modified Grandt windows as shown in the picture, and placed them in the walls, with the frames covered with stripwood, so only the windows themselves show.
-Younger


* Side wall int.jpg (55.93 KB, 550x347 - viewed 761 times.)

* Side wall ext.jpg (53.66 KB, 550x379 - viewed 727 times.)

* Windows.jpg (50.67 KB, 550x521 - viewed 775 times.)
« Last Edit: July 15, 2008, 07:31:01 AM by Younger » Logged

-Younger
myron
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« Reply #41 on: July 17, 2008, 03:36:09 PM »

Thanks Younger.

What are you using to stain your wood?


Myron
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Younger
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« Reply #42 on: July 18, 2008, 07:38:49 AM »

It's made from denatured alcohol (dries quick, without warping) and brown leather dye (not polish). Start with a quantity of alcohol, add dye little by little and test until it looks right. For repeatability, it helps to measure as you go! [grin]
-Younger
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-Younger
lab-dad
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« Reply #43 on: July 21, 2008, 10:40:08 AM »

Here is the wall for my large scale diorama.
Several coats of silverwood, additional ink stains and holes.
Then Chuck's peeling paint in two colors.
It is supposed to represent recycled wood from a......barn or something.
-Marty


* smallwall.JPG (45 KB, 690x341 - viewed 836 times.)
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     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
finescalerr
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« Reply #44 on: July 21, 2008, 12:27:59 PM »

Excellent weathering and wood treatment, young Martin! Among the best I've seen. -- Russ
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