Westlake Publishing Forums
July 14, 2020, 09:28:43 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5
  Print  
Author Topic: Power Hacksaw (1/16th)  (Read 30459 times)
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« on: October 29, 2012, 05:02:22 PM »

Next up on my list of machines is the power hacksaw.
I will be using Brett Gallant's O scale model (MT-550) as my reference.

First off though I need to understand how the machine really worked.
All the power hacksaws i have seen (modern) pivot up at the front and use the sawframes weight to move through the cut material.
I have searched the internet but only found one good image  Sad

On the model it looks like the sawframe moves vertically.
And (I am assuming) it looks like an operator would turn a crank to lower the sawframe.
Wouldn't this also make the linkage to the eccentric have to change length (get shorter) as the sawframe moves down?

Also it looks like the vice bracket can pivot in order to cut angles?

I'd like to make all these things "work" on the model; The vice, the feed, the pivot & I'd also like to be able to spin the drive wheel and see the blade move back & forth.
I'm trying to unthrone Dallas as the crazy king! Shocked

Any help is always appeciated!
-Marty


« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 06:40:05 AM by lab-dad » Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2012, 06:03:55 PM »


I'm trying to unthrone Dallas as the crazy king! Shocked

Any help is always appeciated!
-Marty


To each scale there must be a crazy.

Looks like another great build....

Don't look to me for help...I know nothing about this stuff Grin  Grin

M
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
EZnKY
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 365



« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 06:30:37 PM »

I have a Marvel DrawCut No. 2.  This is essentially the same saw as the one made by Western Scale Models.
I could take a movie of it if you'd like, but there are also a number of movies on youtube showing the saw in operation.

Mine's been converted from flat belt drive to an electric motor sometime in the 20s.
Logged

Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2012, 05:07:43 AM »

Thanks Eric,
I "think" the WS one pivots at the base.
I beleive the blade on the 550 moves vertically.
I will look on you tube.
Knowing the name/model of my prototype would be helpful.
Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
granitechops
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 424



« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2012, 08:21:21 AM »

Going from memory, the blacksmith in Exeter had a real ancient hacksaw, probably 3 ft blade,  it looked like the  power stroke  was delivered horizontaly, to the rear base of the saw frame, which pivoted as neccessary from the end of that arm as it  cut through the material. Obviously such a machine would only be useful for relatively small cross sections, anything really big would need either a longer saw frame to keep the cutting angle reasonable or an automatic horizontal adjustment.

In the one I saw the work was at the front end of the blade allowing for the most shallow cutting angle

In your example of the 550 what exactly did the feed move?
was it perhaps a vertical feed of the vise?

Judging by the wheel size, 14", the blade frame is only about 28-30" long  

Incidentily he moved into a small building that was left over when the huge foundry in Exeter ( Tan Lane?) was demolished so his saw may have actually come from the foundry
« Last Edit: October 30, 2012, 08:26:57 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
Malachi Constant
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1544



« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2012, 10:26:48 AM »

Yes, well, I think I may be the King of Demented Little Silly Details ... and you'll easily rise to King of Clever Mechanical Miniatures, if you're not there already!  Grin

No idea how it works ... look forward to seeing how you sort it out (and looking for videos and getting the right leads there sounds like a real good step) ... and imagining that it would make a helluva nice cheese slicer!  Grin

Cheers,
Dallas
Logged

-- Dallas Mallerich  (Just a freakin' newbie who stumbled into the place)
Email me on the "Contact Us" page at www.BoulderValleyModels.com
michael mott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 511


« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2012, 11:18:43 AM »

Marty, the small ratchet wheel is in all likely hood a feed ratchet that would be operated by the action of the saw moving backwards, so a constant feed, perhaps similar to a shaper.

Michael
Logged
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 05:45:04 PM »

Well after lots of drinking, er THINKING and research I think I figured it out!
I am still amazed at the quality of Charles Brohmmer's models.
Part # 9 the horizontal slide "slides" in dovetails on the top of the cabinet.
Part # 8 Vertical slide & sawframe also sits in dovetails on the Horizontal slide.

So my thinking is inside the cabinet there is an eccentric (referred to in the drawings) and obviously connected to the pulley.
That connects to a protrusion from the horizontal slide running down inside the cabinet using a connecting rod.
Therefore the whole deal; #9 & # 8 are moving back & forth "sawing"

Like Michael said the ratchet would allow the fore/aft action of the sawframe to advance the feed screw with each movement.

I have played with some pieces & parts and it seems feasible...............just now I need to build it, make it work and fit it inside the 1/2" cabinet!
Easy. Embarrassed

Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
granitechops
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 424



« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 04:47:38 AM »

Aw, cmon Marty, its not that small
by a quick guesstimate the base cabinet is 1/2"  x 1"  x 1"  in 1/16th   Grin  Grin   Grin    Grin

For a man of your metal it will work!!
Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2012, 06:05:36 AM »

The base cabinet is .500" wide, 1.332" deep and 1.632" tall.
 Wink
-Mj
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2508



WWW
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2012, 08:07:55 AM »

The original CHB instructions call this a "No. 4 Q and C ".  Lots of power hacksaw videos on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcgm5iucqK4&feature=related  A Q and C No 1. No idea what it stands for.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2012, 08:21:13 AM by Chuck Doan » Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2012, 08:37:20 AM »

You have an original?
Any chance of scanning me a copy of the instructions? (I know there isn't much).

"Q&C" = Quick & Cheap?

Thanks Chuck!!!!!!!!!!!
-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2508



WWW
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2012, 10:40:09 AM »

Scan sent


« Last Edit: October 31, 2012, 10:47:23 AM by Chuck Doan » Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2012, 06:41:41 AM »

Materials ordered.
Thanks to several emails (thanks! Chuck & Dave M. ) and attachments I am ready to move forward.
Stay tuned to this channel for more information as it becomes available.

-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
EZnKY
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 365



« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2012, 05:26:40 PM »

Looking forward to seeing it in action!

I love watching my Marvel cut.  Sometimes I just put scrap in it to watch the action, but don't tell anyone...
Logged

Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!