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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 61969 times)
Peter_T1958
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« Reply #285 on: March 20, 2017, 12:14:18 PM »

Thanks for your words!
Ok, I needed much more time as I had planned to select, as I hope, the right stuff for pouring the river. Finally I decided to try "Heki aqua Nr. 3550" (Thank you for the hint, Marcel!) which I poured in several layers. I'm quite happy overall and the stuff is very easy to handle indeed. There were only two or three air bubbles I had overlooked. But they were no problem, as they could be opened up by drilling and easy filled by the next layer. 



As I had described bevor, the whole arrangement is dividided in an underwater and a surface zone. So the unbeloved creeping up the bank and walls can be prevented. As a consequence I had to poure in all parts up to the waterline, i.E. the walls, the piling and the water gauge.



Notice also the shadowing sprayed directly on the riverbed.



So far so good, BUT ...
...now I have to add some wave structure. There are some good tutorials around, but all are showing the same problem: The waves look always too prominent and uniform.
Stop! One artist, I don't know his name, demonstrates the way it should look! That looks  wonderful!



So back to the workbench! Huh

Cheers, Peter
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finescalerr
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« Reply #286 on: March 20, 2017, 01:05:59 PM »

Jean Bernard Andre achieved pretty subtle results and described his method in the 2013 Modelers' Annual. If you don't have it, send me a private e-mail and I'll send you his article. -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #287 on: March 20, 2017, 02:28:37 PM »

Looks great so far!
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« Reply #288 on: March 20, 2017, 06:03:58 PM »

Looks really great!
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Eric Zabilka
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« Reply #289 on: March 21, 2017, 02:44:10 PM »

Peter,

what the others said. This is going to be something. What came to my mind: To avoid the creeping effect is the best base for realistic water. You already attached some greenish color to the upper base part's lower edge. Not sure if some dark tones and a slight glance from dumpness may add to unify it with the lower water part.

Volker
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #290 on: March 22, 2017, 01:12:29 PM »


Not sure if some dark tones and a slight glance from dumpness may add to unify it with the lower water part.

I am sure, you all know the phenomenon I am confronted with: When you have fnished some part of a project you feel great satisfaction... until that moment, when you add some other parts or, in this particular case, you bring two parts together. Then you have to realise, that they don't match as planned ahead. Volker, I have to give you right, even even if with gritted teeth  Grin

No, seriously now, thank you for your input. I have to unify some other parts too, but I will do that, when all comes together finally. It is planned to hide the seam with a narrow band of algae and dumpness.

BTW. Does anybody know the artist in the last picture of my thread?   


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Bill Gill
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« Reply #291 on: March 22, 2017, 02:16:45 PM »

Peter, Here is a link to the posting of the water that you like. It was posted on the Model Railroader Forum in October 2014.
http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/t/238387.aspx?sortorder=desc
I am not a member of that forum, but Selector/Crandell is still a very active member of there. I have a person I can contact to see if he can give me an address for Crandell.

Here is the little bit of information about him available next to that post:
Selector  (screen name)
Crandell (first? name)
Member since
February, 2005
From: Vancouver Island, BC
20,582 posts


This is the very brief description of how he created that river that was included with the photo:

" I paint the plywood river bed and then pour banks of plaster or ground goop.  When I have dammed the open sides of the vessel that is to be a portion of river or lake, usually just with good quality painters' tape, I mix and pour over the painted plywood a couple of thin pours of finish quality epoxy.  Over the epoxy I smear and stipple a layer of either gloss medium or gel gloss medium."
« Last Edit: March 22, 2017, 02:31:20 PM by Bill Gill » Logged
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