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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 102377 times)
finescalerr
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« Reply #255 on: October 17, 2016, 12:11:30 PM »

I love this forum. Where else can you go to get answers to questions about arcane subjects? -- Russ
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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #256 on: October 17, 2016, 12:18:29 PM »

Pete , pretty sure that is a "centrifugal" type clutch  rather that the plate type you normally get in car transmissions .


That housing above the the gear teeth holds all the bits , it similar in looks and operation to old fashioned drum brakes in a car but in this case it's centrifugal force rather than hydraulics or mechanical action that forces the friction pads to bite into and adhere to the drum sides

If you google centrifugal clutch you will gets lots of images of the innards
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« Reply #257 on: October 17, 2016, 01:08:55 PM »

Ok, a new lead: Centrifugal clutch. Would make sence as there  no kind of control mechanism is necessary.
But what is that horizontal spindle with the wheel for? To me it seems, that it has to  move up and down the inner part ...
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« Reply #258 on: October 18, 2016, 09:45:29 AM »

It looks similar to what steam donkeys use.
May be a search along those lines will help?
I've built several donkeys but no idea how their clutch works. Sorry
Marty
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« Reply #259 on: October 18, 2016, 11:49:41 AM »

Hi Marty

I think you solved the ridde. Thank you very much for the hint! Look what I found at the homeshopmachinist.net forum. Author is Brian Rupnow and he describes his clutch here:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/52188-Model-Steam-Donkey-Engine/page3




Even the cover sheet Volker mentioned fits into the picture!


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Barney
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« Reply #260 on: October 18, 2016, 03:32:24 PM »

great stuff and superb
Barney
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« Reply #261 on: October 19, 2016, 06:19:08 AM »

Thats GREAT!
May be when I make my 1/16th donkey I can make it "work"?
-Mj
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« Reply #262 on: October 30, 2016, 03:23:49 PM »

Last week I had the opportunity to meet Peter in person and to see the model first-hand. It is even much better than what Peter's pictures can depict here. I'm deeply impressed by the quality of his work and his backing research for an item with danger threatening to get lost in a town's historiography. Not to mention the fact that Peter is a very hospitable, humble and friendly person. I'm really looking forward to see the water coming to the diorama and I'm quite sure that we'll all be awed by his results.

Volker
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« Reply #263 on: January 05, 2017, 12:50:32 PM »

A little update

Murphys Law striked again, i.e. shortly before I could finish the underwater part of the pillar, this part of the stonework slided off from the table and ... broke into pieces.
So, back to square one and here ist the result -uff! I tryed to create those stones more porous as they had been exposed to the water.



After finishing the groundwork (fillig, painting, planting) I will try to poure the water up to an even level (red marks) approx. 3.5 cm from the base bottom. I will use the casting water from Heki. Afterwards all parts above the waterline will be built up.





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finescalerr
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« Reply #264 on: January 05, 2017, 01:56:44 PM »

Is it possible that you made the replacement stonework look as good or better than the originals? -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #265 on: January 05, 2017, 02:41:09 PM »

I really love what you've accomplished with the stones for this project. The texture, color, and weathering are all perfect.
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« Reply #266 on: January 05, 2017, 03:12:00 PM »

Murphy can be capricious, but you have more than compensated!
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« Reply #267 on: January 06, 2017, 12:44:09 PM »

The texture, color, and weathering are all perfect.

Thanks a lot for your nice compliment. The colors seem to me still too vibrant and I have to tone them down a bit. But the greenish shine on some of the stones I discovered more by accident than by experiments. In one series I added some grass flocks to the cast compound and those green flocks gathered at the deepest point of the mould, giving the stones a slight mossy appearance.

But some additional thoughts to the groundwork: When he visited me last automn, Volker mentioned that in his opinion there are missing some pebbles that are usually present in a river bed. Volker says always right away, what he thinks, and that is a good thing! So I re-examined the pictures and took a look on-site. Here an example: You may see, there are a lot of debris but almost no pebbles! I assume that during construction all waste was simply disposed in the river bed, which at this point consists of sand still today.



Cheers, Peter

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« Reply #268 on: February 04, 2017, 09:54:16 AM »

Hello

I asked myself, when textured sheet has been invited, i.e. corrugated plate.
Google gave no answer, but old iron stairs often have no profiled surface.
This is the sole top view of the subject (construction years: 1863-1865)  - impossible to see any details.






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« Reply #269 on: February 04, 2017, 07:25:13 PM »

I think what you're referring to is diamond plate, also known as tread plate or Durbar plate. I've seen antique cars that had diamond plate on the running boards, so it has to date back to at least the 1920s, if not earlier.

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