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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 102376 times)
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #180 on: August 22, 2015, 06:50:05 PM »

Great work!
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Barney
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« Reply #181 on: August 23, 2015, 08:16:35 AM »

I agree with all - just mind blowing
Barney
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #182 on: August 24, 2015, 09:08:17 AM »

Peter,

always a pleasure to follow your posts. As the others said - mindblowing handcrafted modeling. How coarse the printed parts' surface looks beneath your hand made items ... I do admire your patience with modeling and the results are fantastic from shape to coloring.

How did you make those gear wheels, especially the sloped differential ones?

Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Peter_T1958
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« Reply #183 on: August 25, 2015, 01:42:47 PM »


How did you make those gear wheels, especially the sloped differential ones?

Volker

That's a tedious and time consuming process, as I do not own a lathe or such equipment (unfortunately). My old drilling machine is my lathe and the major challenge is to cut out exactly the right cone sector with the corresponding diameters (i.e. 8.5 mm).


The sloped back of this gear wheels is made up of several layers of plastic sheet discs, shaped to the desired form with a sharpe knife blade and sandpaper and ... Tamiya putty.



Peter
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #184 on: August 26, 2015, 12:33:35 AM »

Peter,

how about the cogs? How did you make them? Wrought material with spacers of same diameter? Did you chose the cone's diameter according to the wrought material / i.e. number of cogs required?

Thanks,
Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Peter_T1958
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« Reply #185 on: August 26, 2015, 10:56:37 AM »

Hello Volker

It isn't as complicated and professional as it seems. First step is to positioning the cogs (in this case Slaters .040 x .040" strips) with a drawing underneath on about 1/4 of the cone with the help of spacers of same diameter. This is also done on the opposite side of the cone. Then I filled the the spaces between those cogs with the same strips and covered that section with Tamiya tape. It is important that the tape should be firmly rubbed an those loose strips. After removing it there is a conic section of cogs on your tape and can easily placed and glued where desired. If the space is slightly wider than calculated you can stretch the tape carefully to make it fit.

Not easy to explain, but I hope you understand. Huh
Peter
« Last Edit: August 26, 2015, 11:27:31 AM by Peter_T1958 » Logged

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finescalerr
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« Reply #186 on: August 26, 2015, 11:52:28 AM »

Basic modeling techniques with outstanding results. -- Russ
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #187 on: September 30, 2015, 03:56:31 AM »

I've just visited Dave Fishers thread on his SP Narrow Gauge #18. That's what modelmaking is!
After having surpassed the first shock to some extent, I nevertheless decided that I will not throw my own project in the trash... Grin I will move forward courageously and try to improve my skills step by step  Angry
More and more I am suffering from the complexity of the whole arrangement. As there are no plans I have to work from the few contemporary photos. All components need to be checked repeatedly and, where necessary, adjusted after every step, after every new created part.

Here the current status of the project. All parts are still loose fit!




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finescalerr
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« Reply #188 on: September 30, 2015, 01:26:18 PM »

Nothing is wrong with your skills. -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #189 on: September 30, 2015, 08:16:15 PM »

I agree with Russ! This is marvelous work.
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michael mott
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« Reply #190 on: October 05, 2015, 11:14:59 AM »

Peter I have just spent a couple of hours reading this entire thread, I would agree wholeheartedly that you have demonstrated great skill! your model shows that a great deal can be accomplished with the minimum of tooling. Like others have already mentioned I would be very happy with the results you have achieved on my own work. Thank you for picking this model up again and continuing with your researches on the fascinating project.

Michael
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #191 on: November 24, 2015, 08:17:36 AM »

Last weekend I took the time for air-brushing! This is not an easy task, when you don't have an own hobby room. So, in wise foresight I sent my two ladies go shopping in town ...

"What color was the used materials?" With regard to the stone abutement, this question can be answered easily, as the stones had been quarried in nearby southern Germany and there are some original pieces still there.
However, it is more difficult to archieve a coherent picture regarding the colours of the machine components. The sole source that could provide at least some basic indications on colours is a prospectus for the 25th anniversary of the installation from 1890.



Thus, obtaining accurate color information was impossible, I listened to my heart and decided for a bluish light green hue. The Farrow&Ball colour chart describes this hue romantically as Oval Room Blue (a typical late 18th, early 19th century colour) - that's what convinced me.
I am very encouraged by my first attempts (In the first picture it looks too bluish - I am a terrible photographer Grin) and I will continue in this direction. Here some pics, before and after some weathering here and there - still too litte rust stains.





Cheers, Peter
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Allan G
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« Reply #192 on: November 24, 2015, 10:00:34 AM »

Peter; your skills are incredible!!!! I still can't believe you don't have a lathe! I too am glad you're again working on this project. Thank you.....Allan
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #193 on: November 24, 2015, 11:57:27 AM »

That is so excellent! I too am glad to see more progress.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #194 on: November 24, 2015, 12:47:22 PM »

The results are beautiful. Try using more lights when you take photos or else shoot outdoors. You may like your photos more. -- Russ
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