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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 102379 times)
Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #90 on: November 22, 2013, 02:10:42 AM »

Hate to admit that he is right , but Marc's solution re 3d printing is the obvious way to go ......... My ramblings were "so last century"  Grin
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Arno Boudoiron
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« Reply #91 on: November 22, 2013, 09:31:41 AM »

Ouch! Wink Challenging work!  Grin
I have a dummy question: do the pulleys have to turn?
How many pulleys do you need for your project?

I noticed: According to the pictures there are 10 spokes, but 6 on the original drawing. Am I wrong?

Awesome work
Cheers Peter

A.
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #92 on: November 22, 2013, 12:00:06 PM »

Hi gents

It is quite incredible how much assistance I am given from this community! Even support in 3d printing was offered from a member...  I am overwhelmed! Thanks a lot!

@Gordon and Marc
You are certainly right, that 3d printing is the obvious way to go ... and it would surely give an excellent result. Unfortunately I have no experience in that technologie up to now.
 
Gordon, your ideas aren't "so last century" especially in relation to what I am able to do on my desk. So thank you very much for your "ramblings", they helped a lot and provided a fresh impetus to my work: Why not trying it the same way the original was probably made! Yeah, that is it, and it's clear now: I do not have to do the full circle... This doesn't make it too much easier, but it is a new approach I will follow!

@Arno
I have a dummy question: do the pulleys have to turn?
How many pulleys do you need for your project?
I noticed: According to the pictures there are 10 spokes, but 6 on the original drawing. Am I wrong?

1) The pulleys (I need two of them) won't turn - this will be a static model
2) It is almost shameful that I hadn't noticed that until now. You are right: On the original drawing there are only six spokes; in the picture there are always ten. I don't understand how this could happen. I looked at the photos surely a  thousend times ...  Huh Huh Huh
Thanks, Arno, you saved my day!

@Chuck


As I notice now the shape of the outher rim isn't exact the same as in the factory drawings too. I urgently have to redo my sketches!!!   

Peter
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« Reply #93 on: December 17, 2013, 06:37:28 AM »


Hate to admit that he is right , but Marc's solution re 3d printing is the obvious way to go.

As I wrote before I have no experience in that technologie up to now, nevertheless the problem was solved in this way sooner than expected...

After several attempts I had to admit, that there was no reasonable solution in Styrene to this problem (too weak). Therefore I was very happy to accept Volkers grateful offer to do the 3d data model for me, so to speak as a Christmas present :-)
Thanks a lot Volker!!!

Yesterday I received the result from Shapeways. Very clean print!




Cheers, Peter

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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #94 on: December 17, 2013, 09:45:55 AM »

Great result. The whole thing is coming together rather well
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« Reply #95 on: December 17, 2013, 09:55:44 AM »

Nice!  Cool
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« Reply #96 on: December 17, 2013, 11:07:58 AM »

Looks great!
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #97 on: December 17, 2013, 12:10:42 PM »

Very nice! I could not imagine scratchbuilding two of those.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #98 on: December 17, 2013, 01:54:29 PM »

Shapeways to the rescue again. Excellent! -- Russ
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Design-HSB
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« Reply #99 on: December 17, 2013, 03:43:18 PM »

Hello Volker and Peter,

that is successful teamwork.
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Regards Helmut
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« Reply #100 on: December 17, 2013, 04:02:51 PM »

That is nearly true, but Volker himself is the team  Wink  All I could contribute was a drawing and some mesurements!

BTW: He created that virtually overnight - I could hardly believe it!


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lab-dad
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« Reply #101 on: December 17, 2013, 05:08:23 PM »

That is neat!
Will it be used "as-is" or will it be cast in brass?
The reason I ask is you said the styrene was not strong enough.
-Marty
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« Reply #102 on: December 18, 2013, 12:24:46 AM »

Simply lovely.
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Max Corey
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« Reply #103 on: December 18, 2013, 04:51:07 AM »

Very nice.  Interesting technology I know very little about.  Only way I would have otherwise thought to make those would be to either cast them in aluminum or machine them with the CNC mill at Kalamazoo Industries, both some work.
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« Reply #104 on: December 18, 2013, 09:00:19 AM »

Will it be used "as-is" or will it be cast in brass?
The reason I ask is you said the styrene was not strong enough.
-Marty

Hi Marty
I do not have any experience in such material yet, but I intend to use it "as-is". I meant, the styrene wasn't strong enough to work on with saw and file and without Volkers help I would have had to change to brass. But without lathe or milling machine that would have been a huge challenge ...

May I also take this opportunity of asking you where do you get the brass bevel gears on your breathtaking Shay (a feast for the eyes!!!)?

Peter
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