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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 102384 times)
marc_reusser
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« Reply #45 on: January 21, 2013, 06:28:52 PM »

Well, I think it looks beautiful. There is nothing I acn critique here. Looks like a perfect match to the real thing.

Though time consuming and boring, I think the "reality" has caused you to get even better results. The rework you are having to do is giving you just the right amount of randomness, and "constructed" feel, that mimmicks real life.
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« Reply #46 on: January 23, 2013, 08:50:43 AM »

Hi Dallas and Marc

Thank you for your comment. As you will certainly have noticed, I am rather clueless as for painting and weathering sandsone in that scale. I have absolut NO concept even how to start ... Huh Huh Huh

Though there are some incredible discussions in this forum, such as your approach in replicating color and texture of slime/algae at the bottom areas of pilings in Salt Marshes or your salt marsh walkway. I am soaking up such threads like a sponge, but I have to accept that I'm light-years away (yet  Wink) from  the standart you have here in that forum. This should not mean, that I am embarassed about my own modelling skills but rather I am pleased of being allowed to participiate in a discourse of such a level. Thanks!

(It's hard to express myself properly in English)

Peter


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« Reply #47 on: February 26, 2013, 02:31:36 PM »


After checking all my references again and again the question came up whether stone walls (such as those pylons I am working on) generally were masoned to the core or whether they have some sort of filling as in this picture.



First I was planning to fill in the upper side of my pylon in this way (sketch below), but now I am no longer sure about this, and unfortunately there are no photos from the upper surface.



Any experts out there?

Thanks, Peter
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2013, 07:58:29 PM »

hi peter
what do you mean by filling in the upper levels.
what i see in the picture is the sandstone as a veneer-that it is the dressing for the concrete core.all the strength is in the concrete-steel,bolts.
kind regards kim
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« Reply #49 on: February 27, 2013, 03:59:03 AM »

The photo sees to be a newer version, done to try and replicate some of the feel of the old (but IMO failing) Any chance you can look at pilings for similar scale constrctions along the Aare, from a similar time period, and see how they were done?
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« Reply #50 on: February 27, 2013, 12:22:38 PM »

Thanks, Marc and Kim for your answers and the helpful hint!

@Marc

The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe



Barely twenty minutes from my home is the beautiful Hemishofen Railway bridge, built in 1875!
Today I took my camera, jumped in my car and here the answer:



The bridge is built on sandstone-clad concrete plinths (also on the upper side). Moreover, the photo shows very clear texture of moss on the upper and slime/algae build-up at and bottom areas...

I think I will go that way ...

Cheers, Peter


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« Reply #51 on: April 13, 2013, 01:08:46 PM »


Well, it's quite a long time without updating this post. But I haven't been inactive all the time. I was casting further blocks of sandstone and sanded each of them into line. Now I have finished the foundation at least. 
Furthermore I was roamig around and took a look at some similar constructions along the Rhine from the same time period to see how they were done (Thanks for the hint, Marc!).

Here my interpretation of the pattern on the upper side. Hope this is halfway realistic ... Undecided



As a next step I would like to do a slilcone rubber mold from this master to cast one or two examples for painting trials.

Regards, Peter




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« Reply #52 on: April 13, 2013, 09:21:17 PM »

That looks terrific! Very well done!
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« Reply #53 on: April 17, 2013, 02:44:29 PM »

I think it looks great. Only question...if I am going to be really critical....is that first stone up from the corner, in the top row, on the right side.....at this scale, it seems to stick out a bit far.   Smiley

Like I said...I am being hyper critical...and only so, because youhave spent so much time on the stone finish, to keep it all "in scale".

...and it is not as if I could do any better. Smiley

Marc Smiley
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« Reply #54 on: April 20, 2013, 01:54:37 PM »

Peter,

it looks very good. I would start painting on it without making molds. You would get a monochrome cast which isn't representative concerning what you've shown us here.

If you start with very dilute water color you won't destroy anything. It always takes a lot of coats to get the desired darkness, but it looks very real. Working wet in wet you can achieve nearly invisible transitions between different colors. Please wait until it's dry after your first steps as things get much brighter when they're drying.

Volker
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« Reply #55 on: May 02, 2013, 01:55:32 PM »

Meanwhile I did some trials in Marc Reussers "Hairspray/Windex-Methode". What I want to try is replicating the color and texture of an aged sandstone wall.

As a first step I made a slilcone rubber mold from quick glued stones and casted some examples for painting trials... but this was useless.

I would start painting on it without making molds. You would get a monochrome cast which isn't representative concerning what you've shown us here.
Volker

Volker, you were right. On the cast examples all looked monochrome and somehow bromidic. This first test sample here looks a little more real to me although it was "random chance" Undecided.





What I did until now:

1. Heavily diluted mixture of Tamiya olive/gray/black here and there, mainly in the darker top row
2. Clear coat with Future
3. Hairspray from can
4. Tamiya tinned mixture of gray/white/sand more or less everywhere
5. 30 minutes drying time
6  Windows cleaner shots to wipe away some color (Hahaha: Some color ... most of it came off, even most of the Future!!!)

I am not so sure about the result. So I hope with some further washes and detailing (e.g. lichen patches, ...) it will become more contrasty.

Please tell me, what do you think ....and yes, I do enjoy critical response too... to achieve higher grounds ... ! 


Cheers, Peter
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« Reply #56 on: May 04, 2013, 08:01:31 AM »


... and with washes and some lichen patches just to try out.

     
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« Reply #57 on: May 04, 2013, 08:50:12 AM »

Peter,

I would delighted if I could even get close to this ........ Looks very impressive to me.

Think some lichen, moss , etc would just help give it a touch of life so look forward to seeing your next update
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« Reply #58 on: May 05, 2013, 05:31:18 PM »

Peter, really nothing critical I can say about this.

Like Gordon, I would be thrilled to get such a result.....even at a larger scale....and yes, maybe, once the whole thing is done, and set together, some green mossy/lichen in some areas of the grout..and maybe a small weed or vegetation sprouting in a gap in the stones.

Marc
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« Reply #59 on: May 06, 2013, 12:58:48 AM »

Peter,

looks very realistic to me. As Marc said there may be some moss/fern in the joints and lichen at the dry and algae at the humid spots.

Volker
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