Westlake Publishing Forums
November 14, 2018, 04:37:47 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 ... 19 20 21 [22] 23 24 25
  Print  
Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 102258 times)
Peter_T1958
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 210



WWW
« Reply #315 on: November 23, 2017, 12:41:34 PM »

Hi all

Finally some minutes on the workbench yet. I' am about to build some of the scaffoldings used for maintaining the gears on the quayside. Concerning the ladders (or better stairways) I hoped to use some commerciel products in 1/50 scale. As you may see, that doesen't match at all!



Does anybody has a clever hint how soldering together something like that?

Logged

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5187


« Reply #316 on: November 23, 2017, 12:52:40 PM »

Your modeling far surpasses most commercial products. -- Russ
Logged
michael mott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 511


« Reply #317 on: November 23, 2017, 03:46:53 PM »

Quote
Does anybody has a clever hint how soldering together something like that?

Looking at the level of perfection that you have already achieved with your own hands, I doubt that there is anything in the market that could hold a candle to your work.

Have you tried using one of the air soldering stations? they are amazing. assemble the work and hold it together with some pins use liquid cleaning type flux and flatten some tin solder so that is is like a foil 1/32 x .010 drape some short length over the ends of the treads play the heat gently on the opposite side and watch it flow together.

Michael 
Logged
Lawton Maner
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 431


« Reply #318 on: November 24, 2017, 08:22:23 AM »

I've had very good results using a jeweler's soldering pad, solder paste, and SWMBO's oven when she isn't home.  Pin the assembly to the heat resistant pad over a piece of baker's parchment (to help protect the pad from the flux), apply the solder paste sparingly to the parts, and bake.  You then turn the oven off and wait.  Many sub-assemblies used in the manufacture of brass models from the far east are made in similar fashion.  BTW, surface mounted electronic chips can be soldered on the stove top in a frying pan or in a toaster oven on a small slab of metal. 
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5187


« Reply #319 on: November 24, 2017, 02:09:16 PM »

I've been reading about and building models since the time of Piltdown Man and never knew about that method. My friend and onetime great modeler, Richard Christ, taught me a variation of Michael's technique (and slightly less precise) but soldering entire subassemblies in an oven? What a couple of great ideas! -- Russ
Logged
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 602



WWW
« Reply #320 on: November 24, 2017, 03:09:59 PM »

Why not solder it piece by piece? First the bigger parts, thrn the small ones. Protecting the finished soldering areas with toothpaste helps to deflect heat and so does a piece of handkerchief drenched with water. An RSU would work fine, too.

Cheers,
Volker
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2094



« Reply #321 on: November 25, 2017, 04:22:11 PM »

I solder a lot of different things but I'm no expert.
However I would suggest a resistance soldering unit and wet paper towels on completed joints or close pins.
I use close pins a lot for soldering and often modify them.

Martin
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Lawton Maner
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 431


« Reply #322 on: November 25, 2017, 08:02:14 PM »

     When doing some sorts of delicate work, it is easier to pin assemblies together add a tiny amount of Rio Grande Jewelry supply's 430 solder to the joints and bake.  If you have a number of small joins to make as on a 1:48 scale fire escape ladder, even a resistance setup might give you fits trying to add a connection without the one next to it falling apart.
     430 solder comes in a syringe and can be applied in truly tiny amounts.  I have no connection with Rio Grande Jewelry Supply other then a regularly anemic credit card.
     Not the only way to do a complicated job, but a trick to have in your pocket when you need it.
Logged
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3839



WWW
« Reply #323 on: November 25, 2017, 08:04:44 PM »

What kind of soldering pad do you use that can have pins stuck into it?
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
Peter_T1958
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 210



WWW
« Reply #324 on: November 26, 2017, 06:57:07 AM »



Hi gents
Thank you very much for all your thoughts. Your proposals have many good ideas including an air soldering station. Working on a desk with minimum of equipment I have never heard of that. But especially this caught my attention and in the meantime I have googled around a lot. I think I will order one soon, particularly in view of a future project, that surely will be made of brass.
Concerning the ladder I will have to try it the hard way yet: soldering it piece by piece. (Obviously Volker knows my modest resources since he visited me some time ago, that's why he proposes this way ;-) Protecting the finished soldering areas with toothpaste is a helpful clue, thanks!

Ok, back to the workbench ...

P.S.
I also wonder ...
Quote
What kind of soldering pad do you use that can have pins stuck into it?

Logged

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 838



WWW
« Reply #325 on: November 26, 2017, 07:42:08 AM »


P.S.
I also wonder ...
Quote
What kind of soldering pad do you use that can have pins stuck into it?


It is often called a honeycomb soldering pad. I have one, and I find it very useful!

Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
fspg2
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 235



« Reply #326 on: November 26, 2017, 09:31:20 AM »

Hi Peter,

I am always happy about your contributions to this great model!
 
Indeed this soldering pad ist very helpful!

For example I used it to get equal parts for a scaffold:

Geruest_5 (fspg2)



Geruest_6 (fspg2)



Geruest_7 (fspg2)


In Germany you can order such a soldering pad at:
a) Fischer/Pforzheim  or
b) Fohrmann and soldering steel pin: here
C)...Huh...

@Hauk
Where did yor get your pins, the are a little bit longer?

Frithjof
Logged

Frithjof
Peter_T1958
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 210



WWW
« Reply #327 on: November 26, 2017, 09:34:51 AM »

Ahh, I see. I've seen that at a local narrow gauge exhibition. But I am not sure, if this helps in case of very small items. And "my" ladders are very small - here a quick shot with my Iphone:


Logged

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 602



WWW
« Reply #328 on: November 26, 2017, 12:57:53 PM »

Do you have to align all stairs freehand or are there milled/etched notches in the longer parts? If so I'd mount it with some CA, fix it in between some aluminum angles and then use the flambé torch; Griffon S39 soldering fluid and some solder to get it together.
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Peter_T1958
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 210



WWW
« Reply #329 on: November 26, 2017, 02:01:02 PM »

Cought! I had to align all stairs freehand - it was an afternoon full of "f***" and "sh**" as I had to desolder more then one step several times, cleaning the surfaces and restart. Yes, some sort of template would not be a bad idea Cry
Logged

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/
Pages: 1 ... 19 20 21 [22] 23 24 25
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!