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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 126619 times)
nk
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« Reply #240 on: August 03, 2016, 12:26:54 PM »

Hi Peter,
I have used polyester resin...On top of a Plexiglas/perspex base I added layers of resin (be aware that it shrinks a little as it cures) with powdered pigments in the lowest layers because I was modeling dirty canal water. I blew a fan over the curing surface to make ripples and it worked like a dream. I used Future floor polish as a top coat and it looks great at first, but after a year it developed a heavy cracking pattern. I removed the Future with alcohol and cotton wool and applied Golden acrylic medium and everything as been fine since. I used a thicker more viscous Golden acrylics to fill the space between the water and the wall.  I use polyester at work all the time and it can be shaped and polished easily.

Here are some images FYI

This is a top down view of the dirty "water" i.e. the initial layer of polyester and pigments




How I prepared the "water" separately from the rest of the base. This meant I could cut it to shape and remove the unwanted meniscus at the edge


after installation






I hope that helps.
Narayan

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« Reply #241 on: August 03, 2016, 12:50:42 PM »

Narayan, not to hijack Peter's thread, your canal water looks really good, but I'm curious - how thick was the coating of Future that you said cracked after a year? I have a small stream on my layout that originally had a thin Liquitex gloss medium for the top coat. After ten years or so the water surface looked a little less transparent and less glossy. It wasn't dust. I cleaned it carefully and then applied a very thin coat of Future on top. That restored the watery look. It's been that way now for about two and a half years and I haven't found and cracking or loss of shine. Is that fate yet to come?
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« Reply #242 on: August 03, 2016, 02:59:42 PM »

Bill, I think my layer of Future was too thick, and its this that led to the cracking.
NK
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« Reply #243 on: August 03, 2016, 11:18:17 PM »

So no problems with polyester resin yellowing over time?



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« Reply #244 on: August 04, 2016, 12:07:02 AM »

very nice water great bricks
i still think you need a chemical reaction the water in peters picture is very random this can only be modeled by a out of control reaction.do it outside if you worried about the fumes.
i suppose i should tell you i have never done this approach it just strikes me as a possibility.
cheers
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« Reply #245 on: August 04, 2016, 10:43:15 AM »

First, thank you all for your assistance in this topic. Searching for information on the internet leads to the conclusion, that either of the methods have their advantages and disadvantages.  But my specific case with very shallow water interspersed with lumps of stone and debris at the river banks and river water buttercups (Ranunculus fluitans) rules out one or two approaches right from the start. That means, I have to poure necessarily some sort of liquid around and on top of those debris.

@Narayan
Love your canal and especially you brick wall very, very much. IMHO one of your best dioramas, and a convincing argument for polyester resin. The gently rippled surface is exactly what I am looking for! But ... unfortunately I can't do the water separately from the rest of the base for the reasons I mentioned before. Good to hear, that blowing air over the surface worked so well!

Here again the original:

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« Reply #246 on: August 05, 2016, 06:05:42 AM »

Bottom line; that brick wall and river looks real to me!
Marty
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« Reply #247 on: August 05, 2016, 09:28:21 AM »

Peter, Here's a post on a forum about making water that has a river with water flowing somewhat like you need

"http://model-railroadhttp://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/25898#comment-234738
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« Reply #248 on: August 05, 2016, 12:35:10 PM »

Bill, the post titled "I wouldn't call water hard or" shows exactly the surface I would like to archieve!
Many thanks for the link!

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« Reply #249 on: August 05, 2016, 01:04:17 PM »

Peter,

some thoughts to avoid creeping of the resins: http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/16603.
@ Narayan: Marvellous!

Volker
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« Reply #250 on: October 15, 2016, 10:05:11 AM »

Okay, while waiting for the next spontaneous inspiration for the groundwork I started up research for the next step.






This vertical bevel gear has some sort of clutch release.  I've only this pic and a somewhat blurry sketch. 





Now I'am asking myself, what kind of mechanism is hidden in the outher (red) wheel. It is evident that there must be an mechanism (blue arrow) fixed to the inner gear wheel (yellow) that it can engage in the outer wheel.
Does somebody knows about such mechanisms? Huh




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« Reply #251 on: October 15, 2016, 03:42:14 PM »

Peter, I don't have a clue how that clutch might work, but wonder if you looked at diagrams or plans for clutches for factory machinery or water powered electric generators, or perhaps even large truck transmissions there might be something similar enough that could help you decipher the clutch for your bridge?
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« Reply #252 on: October 17, 2016, 01:26:40 AM »

Hello Peter,

I think it will be a clutch. The bevel gear is always running and the shaft upwards has a square on which the clutch plate can be raised and lowered.
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« Reply #253 on: October 17, 2016, 02:01:03 AM »

Peter,

for sure this is a clutch. My interpretation: The outer cogged wheel was constantly running. The inner part was movable up and down, which opened and closed the clutch.

I first thought of some kind of centrifugal clutch, but maybe it was simply used to cut power off from the waterwheels. I think in the picture above there are small screws around the outer diameter, which fixed a cover sheet (note the sloped part under the clutch lever above missing in the drawing), so you don't have to model the interior parts. The parts under the blue arrow might be spokes and the clutch might have been separated to service it without demounting all additional parts? Unfortunately the drawing's resolution is to low to recognize anything else.

Cheers,
Volker

 
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« Reply #254 on: October 17, 2016, 08:46:21 AM »

Thanks for your additional thoughts!

@ Bill
I did a lot of research, but the result was rather poor, only some pics like that. It seems that there is some sort of clutch too, but no idea about it's function.




@Helmut and Volker
I think in the picture above there are small screws around the outer diameter, which fixed a cover sheet (note the sloped part under the clutch lever above missing in the drawing), so you don't have to model the interior parts.

For me, too, it must be aclutch to cut power off from the transmission wheels. And you are right! I did'n't noticed those screws: Maybe, the cover sheet under the clutch lever will hide most if not all of the the interior parts.

My own interpretation: The outer bevel gear was cogged inside as well as outside. It was fixed loose on shaft. The inner wheel was constantly running as it was set in motion by the square or hexagonal part of the shaft. The inner part was movable up and down by a crank wheel also visible in the drawing, and so opened and closed the clutch.

Cheers, Peter
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