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Author Topic: Steel cable transmission  (Read 130117 times)
Stoker
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« Reply #135 on: July 18, 2014, 09:41:38 AM »

Great job on the stonework, I especially like the moss. The issue of the wooden teeth on some gears is interesting. I do however disagree with the conclusion about the purpose of the wooden gear teeth being sacrificial mechanical overload protection. The idea of using a single shear pin to protect mechanisms goes back centuries and no engineer worth his salt would design something that requires replacing hundreds of precision wooden teeth every time there is a mechanical overload on the system instead of replacing a single shear pin. Just an observation.
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #136 on: July 18, 2014, 10:51:33 AM »

An article in an early issue of the English magazine "Model Engineering Workshop" referred to an early 20th century work in which it stated that prior to the introduction of higher mathematics in the design of gear teeth, it was common to make one gear with wooden teeth as in this example so that only the weaker teeth would wear.  Today you will see a brass or plastic gear introduced into a train of gears to be sacrificed to wear.  As soon as I get the collection out of storage, I'll add the reference.
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #137 on: July 18, 2014, 11:23:50 AM »

Hello

I found this at: www.newhallmill.org.uk

Gear Wheel with Wooden Teeth

Many visitors to the Mill are surprised to learn that some of the gears transferring the power from the waterwheel to the millstones are fitted with wooden teeth. Millers found that using wooden and metal toothed gears together produced less noise when the mill operated and reduced the wear on the metal toothed gears. It also acted as an additional safety factor as the wooden teeth will break under excessive force.
The teeth, or 'cogs', were usually made from apple, cherry or hornbeam wood, cut to shape before being inserted into the cast iron gear wheel frame. If a tooth became worn or broken, it could be removed and replaced by a new one.
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NE Brownstone
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« Reply #138 on: July 18, 2014, 12:00:25 PM »

Excellent job on the stonework!
Could the differential gear been for equalizing the torque amongst the two wheels?  It could be for reversing, or supplying a reversed cable.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 12:04:14 PM by NE Brownstone » Logged

Russ
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Stoker
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« Reply #139 on: July 18, 2014, 12:10:06 PM »

Interesting points about the use of wooden teeth in this type of situation. Being that the original gears appear to have been all been metal, it seems like the noise reduction aspect of using some wooden toothed gears would be the most logical answer as to why the switch was made. Especially when you see that these were in a very populated area. This is my opinion, but to me it seems like the friability aspect of wooden teeth engaged against steel ones would result in increased maintenance and downtime. Protection from catastrophic overload of the mechanism is more of a by product of using wooden teeth , rather than the intended goal in this case, because if this were the intent using a shear pin is obviously the superior method.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 12:13:55 PM by Stoker » Logged

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« Reply #140 on: July 18, 2014, 01:59:35 PM »

Thanks gents for your thoughts!

The last pic shows a scrap piece for trials and not the abutement itself. And yes, of course I have to improve is the colour of the moss blotches and the size of the flakes (HEKI Mikrolaub Belaubungsflocken) yet. Maybe a light brownish/yellowish overspray will help ...

Here the real thing - the direction I would like to move: 




Peter
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #141 on: July 18, 2014, 10:51:53 PM »

Marvelous work on the weathering and moss.

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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #142 on: July 22, 2014, 10:26:10 AM »


Here a small update after today's long painting session (I painted the lichen blotches in the upper wall with a small pencil). It's a long way to go yet, but together with one finished support pillar I'am staring to build up a picture of the final appearance now. Roll Eyes



Cheers, Peter
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« Reply #143 on: July 24, 2014, 10:48:48 AM »

... and here a last update before start on vacation with my family.

Finally was able to finish one of the bigger gear wheels. All my casting attempts led to a dead end and it seems that I have to build up each gear scratch from styrene... huh!
I'm not quite sure if the weathering isn't a little bit overdone (for an installation that is operational after all ...). What do you think?



« Last Edit: July 24, 2014, 01:59:20 PM by Peter_T1958 » Logged

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Design-HSB
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« Reply #144 on: July 24, 2014, 12:37:02 PM »

Peter, I think you need to see and continue the design started your work as a whole.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #145 on: July 24, 2014, 01:01:37 PM »

That is a very good looking gear. I can't really comment on the accuracy of the weathering but the appearance pleases my eye. -- Russ
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #146 on: July 24, 2014, 01:25:49 PM »

Peter,

the gear looks very impressive! Did you really scratchbuild that completely, even the teeth?

If you need support with the "no go technology" for modelers, I'll again be happy to help  Wink. After my vacancies.

Cheers,
Volker
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« Reply #147 on: July 24, 2014, 02:05:43 PM »

Thanks volks!

@Volker
Once again, generous offer! Thank you very much. Who knows - maybe some day I will have to get to that point, but I do not hope so ...
At the moment, traditional crafts are sufficient, although building each gear wheel by scratch increases the amount of time significantly! Angry

Here the unpainted gear:   


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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #148 on: July 24, 2014, 10:27:12 PM »

Splendid work! Except for the background, I would not have guessed it was a model. The weathering looks "right" to me, not too rusty, with plenty of grease. Only thing I wonder is whether the teeth might be a bit more shiny from use?

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« Reply #149 on: July 27, 2014, 10:03:04 AM »

I've been around a few greasy wheels and equipment over the years and have to say that you nailed it as far as weathering.  I do agree with Ray about the shiny teeth, but don't over do it.  Just on the faces of contact.
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Russ
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