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Author Topic: 1/12th scale metal pedal cars from scratch.  (Read 9922 times)
5thwheel
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« on: August 30, 2012, 09:39:13 PM »

These are all metal pedal cars I built from scratch. They are in 1/12th scale. The bodies are formed from .010 tin. The wheels are two halves press formed from tin with a brass bearing. The dump truck bed raises and opens the tail gate when the side leaver is operated.  Sorry about the pictures being so small.  Problem with photobucket.

......
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Bill Hudson
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2012, 11:47:50 PM »

Very nice!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
lab-dad
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2012, 05:45:53 AM »

Very cool!
Do you use wooden bucks to form the body shapes?
-Marty
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     Martin G. Jones Photography
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2012, 11:26:21 AM »

Bill -- That's some beautiful metal work and finishing!  Not only that, but just plain neat fun stuff!  Wink

Marty -- Watch the video segment linked in Bill's signature -- answers your question and a good way to spend a minute or two!

Cheers,
Dallas
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Scratchman
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« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2012, 12:46:47 PM »

Nice model building Bill. Thanks for posting the photos.

Gordon Birrll

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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lab-dad
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« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2012, 07:30:17 PM »

Great video!
Really enjoyed seeing the work and your shop!
-Marty
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     Martin G. Jones Photography
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« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2012, 10:35:23 PM »

Terrific video, and really great craftsmanship!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Wesleybeks
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2012, 07:59:43 AM »

Awesome stuff
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Kind Regards
Wesley

Modelling in sunny South Africa
5thwheel
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« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2012, 05:21:44 PM »

Additional wheel good. A 1937 child's scooter.  This scooter, the pedal car roadster and the fire truck were classes I taught at the Guild School in Castine Maine one week each June. They all take the same wheels.  The scooter was a 12 hour class, the pedal cars were 36 hour classes.  I have found the manuals for the classes and may combine them and offer them for sale.


* IMG_0456.jpg (35.32 KB, 640x480 - viewed 1455 times.)
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Bill Hudson
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finescalerr
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2012, 01:51:57 AM »

The bolts seem a little large but I can imagine a plausible explanation. The scooter itself is wonderful. -- Russ
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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2012, 06:18:21 AM »

I'd love to see the manuals...

Paul
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Paul
5thwheel
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2012, 08:39:50 AM »

The bolts seem a little large but I can imagine a plausible explanation. The scooter itself is wonderful. -- Russ

Thanks Russ, This project was developed for a class to be taught and completed in 12 hours for students of all levels of skills. The scale had to be in 1/12th (doll house). Yes the bolts (rivets) are a bit over scale.  I used Atlas track nails to simulate the bolts.  There would not have been time to make scale bolts.  The scooters were built from hobby tin (0.10) for the wheels, the frame is formed from nickel silver strip (I had it especially drawn to size) The handle bar is just a cotton swab stick turned to shape. The foot board is 1/16 model ply. In person it looks pretty good. To the critical eye of macro lens not. I had 12 students in the class, one Sherline lathe and the majority of the students were middle aged women who had never had any lathe, metal, or soldering experience in the past.  All completed their scooters and most came out looking good.  The second year I taught the pedal car roadster with most of the women returning and with the same results.  If you can teach try it it a great experience. If you can get a chance to teach, do it, it is a fine experience. Women are the better students. Men seem to have ego problems and tend to want to run the class.
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Bill Hudson
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5thwheel
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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2012, 08:49:54 AM »

I'd love to see the manuals...

Paul

Paul, the scooter in the photo is setting on the manual, you can see it if you look closely. Grin  Actually the manual was written in 19897-88.  It is all typewritten as I did not have a computer then.  I plan on combining the scooter, and the two pedal car manuals into one book and try to sell them but I need to find a good OCR program that I can copy them to so I can edit them as needed.  The manuals were designed for a class room setting where I provided the lathe and the dies and jigs for making the wheels.   I have a iMac and am having a problem finding a good OCR for it.  The one the is with my  Epson scanner is so bad the it would be easier to re write the manuals from scratch.
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Bill Hudson
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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2012, 05:36:30 AM »

Bill,

Thanks, I could see that was the manual!

With Adobe Acrobat you can cut and paste text. So if you have  scanner and Acrobat you can scan your pages, then cut and paste the text into a new document, like Word so you can edit it. You can do the editing in Acrobat but it is kind of clumsy. You need to look into exactly which version you need I think there are several with different features. I know the one I have you can do this. Mine is Adobe Acrobat 9 Pro.  After seeing the tutorial you posted a link to I now know you are on the Practical Machinist forum too. I remember the oil cans which I have saved a pic of years ago!

Paul
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Paul
5thwheel
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« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2012, 04:24:58 PM »

Paul,

Today I had a technician come out to do some work on my computer and printer.  While here he loaded a program called Readiris 11, for scanning OCR. On my Mac it is both fast and accurate.  I think I am in business for copying and editing.  Next comes the decision of whether to go for publishing them in print form or CD.

Bill
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Bill Hudson
Fall down nine times,
get up ten.
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