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Author Topic: Back to the Big  (Read 187205 times)
finescalerr
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« Reply #45 on: September 05, 2012, 01:47:43 AM »

A solution of alcohol and India ink does not provide the same results as SilverWood. Jerry Lawrence used both on the same structures (I published two where he did that) and the wood looks different. Of course, it might be the result of using different strengths of stain but, to my eye when I actually saw the structure, SilverWood looks, well, more silver.

One interesting change: Jerry displayed the models under fluorescent lights from time to time over a period of a year or two and the SilverWood almost faded away leaving the wood almost in its original color, but slightly yellowed due to oxidation. I think the India ink stain held up slightly better but the yellowed wood looks more brown as a result. (Black + yellow = brown.)

Neither is perfect nor ideal.

Russ
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mad gerald
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« Reply #46 on: September 05, 2012, 02:31:45 AM »

... turning out pretty cool (and what the others said), Chuck  Grin ... following your building report with interest, as I'm going to give 1/16 a try too ...

... The nails look pretty dam good to ...
... did you use fishing line or brass rod (0,5 diameter) .. and if you did use the latter: How did you make the nail heads ...  Huh

... I managed to obtain two bottles of the stuff from Caboose Hobbies a while back. But now it seems they have realised how absolutely deadly the stuff is, and refuse to ship it overseas.
@Hauk: what meaning does the term "deadly" have in this context: deadly=really dangerous ... or deadly=as a description for i. e. great, terrific,

... When I ordered Silverwood from Builders in Scale I got the following information from them. "Sorry can´t ship overseas but just mix Isopropyl (rubbing alcohol in the US) and india ink and you will have the same thing". Not so sure.... Huh?
Would be interesting to see a test from somebody who has access to both potions.
... just wonder, in case the Silverwood stain consists only of isopropylalcohol and india ink if one could mix it reallyoneself or why the premixed original stuff can turn out so dangerous ... ?

Cheers
« Last Edit: September 05, 2012, 02:37:49 AM by mad gerald » Logged
Wesleybeks
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« Reply #47 on: September 05, 2012, 02:35:25 AM »

WOW.Stunning stuff Chuck.

The first picture sums up my modelling versus yours. Mine is the printed window and yours is the perfect peeling paint.

Im gonna go get my lego set out now.
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #48 on: September 05, 2012, 08:08:03 AM »

Thanks very much! Yes Gordon it is the infamous (and now apparently deadly) Silverwood.  Here are the basic steps for the basswood (I am using the Midwest products fractional sizes):

Sand surfaces smooth with fine sanding stick and quick Silverwood coat to spot bad basswood grain (too big or wavy)

Add graining with fine wire brush. Cracks and splits with Xacto. Insect damage with dental pick. Then steel wool clean-up.

Approx. 2 coats Silverwood stain

Brush on grey, brown orange Bragdon powders and wash with acetone
to sear powders into wood (same as barn dio)

After paint application touch up exposed wood with gouache.  (the water color pencils are a good idea Dallas)

Gerald, the set nails are .02 (.5 mm) diameter brass wire. The headed nails are .010 fishline. Chuck a piece in a pin vise leaving approx. .03 sticking out. Hold up to a flame until it balls up and then press it against a flat surface. Sand the resulting “head” flat. Usually makes a great round head. From an idea that came from a couple of Terrapin group members.

Thanks Ray, I copied a photo on Flickr of the same kind of thing.

Thanks too to Virgil (Dr. Cranky) Suarez who first introduced me to the Ranger paints.
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« Reply #49 on: September 06, 2012, 03:57:19 AM »


... I managed to obtain two bottles of the stuff from Caboose Hobbies a while back. But now it seems they have realised how absolutely deadly the stuff is, and refuse to ship it overseas.
@Hauk: what meaning does the term "deadly" have in this context: deadly=really dangerous ... or deadly=as a description for i. e. great, terrific,


In this context "deadly" can be read as "likely to blow up airplanes." So I guess you could say "really dangerous" also.

The seemingly total shipping ban on inflamable liquids seems a bit strange as silverwood stain is probably no more inflamable than the liquer the passengers are drinking...

By the way, the poor lightresistant qualities og SW is a bit worrying. I mean, I can accept that stains are not totally UV-resistant, but they should stand up to fluorescent lights.

Regards, Hauk
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Regards, Hauk
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« Reply #50 on: September 06, 2012, 04:40:58 AM »

It´s complete nonsense these regulations that started after 9/11. My hand luggage on many transatlantic flights used to contain among other things DioSol thinner, Floquil paints, etchant from Radio Shack, Gordon´s Gin  Grin Grin etc. This might be a bit over the top but under normal shipping conditions (US Post Office) I can´t understand what the problem is. If you use a shipping agent in the US you can ship all these items but that is of course very expensive.

Anders
« Last Edit: September 06, 2012, 04:46:28 AM by Junior » Logged
mad gerald
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« Reply #51 on: September 06, 2012, 05:01:54 AM »

@Hauk: what meaning does the term "deadly" have in this context: deadly=really dangerous ... or deadly=as a description for i. e. great, terrific,
In this context "deadly" can be read as "likely to blow up airplanes." So I guess you could say "really dangerous" also.
... ah, thanks ... so it's all about transportation risks ... and I suspected someone could have discovered, that the usage - in general - may be hazardous to one's health ...

Cheers
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #52 on: November 05, 2012, 11:18:33 AM »

I haven’t gotten a lot of modeling done lately, but I am still slowly chipping away at my wall. Nothing too interesting; I finally made it to the top with the siding.  The window panes are mock-ups.





Classic eave vents. Considerate to birds and bees.


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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #53 on: November 05, 2012, 12:21:32 PM »

Chuck only you would be so considerate of the birds & bees.  A very nice detail.   And mostly likely another 1st.

Jerry
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« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2012, 12:40:52 PM »

I haven’t gotten a lot of modeling done lately, but I am still slowly chipping away at my wall. Nothing too interesting; I finally made it to the top with the siding.  The window panes are mock-ups.





Classic eave vents. Considerate to birds and bees.




  And rats , wasps and bats . What a magnani-mouse sort of chap you are !
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finescalerr
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« Reply #55 on: November 05, 2012, 01:42:00 PM »

I think you should keep those windows. -- ssuR
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lab-dad
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« Reply #56 on: November 05, 2012, 01:52:14 PM »

Shouldn't there be screen, or remnants of behind the vents?
Those windows look like my windows!
-Marty
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« Reply #57 on: November 05, 2012, 01:56:45 PM »

I to think that there should be screen behind the wood.   Wink
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Craig
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« Reply #58 on: November 05, 2012, 07:03:12 PM »

I was wondering what happened to this project!  Those window panes must be some of the crappiest modeling you've ever shown!  Grin  -- Dallas
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« Reply #59 on: November 06, 2012, 01:18:39 AM »

Yes, there needs to be a mammaximum 1/4"x1/4" mesh behind those holes.  Grin

I am sure you reearched and found an example of what you did with the siding at the bottom and between the rafters,.......and I can't believe there is something in your work tht bugs me...however the siding bits between the rafters, and the way they hang down so as to lap, just seems odd/off to me.....I would probably have gone more along the typical lines of 2x blocking that is the height of the rafter (they generally used a taller piece and angle cut the top to align with the rafter/roof sheathing slope) and stands about 1/2" to 3/4" proud of the siding piece below.
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