Westlake Publishing Forums
August 24, 2019, 10:27:51 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5
  Print  
Author Topic: Lombard Rail Truck  (Read 43110 times)
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2008, 06:08:00 PM »

Gordon, you are making going back to O scale very difficult!
Although after working on the trusses for my shed, I dont have the room.....
Beautiful.
One question; wouldn't the wheels loose most of their color due to friction/heat?
I am assuming that now that I asked, you will reveal there is still further weathering....
-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 745


« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2008, 11:19:38 PM »

Thanks guys,
Marty your right about the wear on the wheels I'm going to try to do something over the top of what I've
already done. I will experiment with the front wheels first. Maybe a wash or some dry-brushing.

Gordon Birrell


 
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2008, 11:29:12 PM »

Just wonderful Gordon.

I can only echo what the others have already said. 

The Skid plate/guard plate wrapping inder the transmission is a neat detail.

Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5419


« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2008, 02:33:51 AM »

Please, guys, don't encourage him. He'll just get inspired and do an even better job.

Russ
Logged
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2008, 07:17:46 AM »

Gordon,
what about using a graphite pencil over a "burnt" hue?
An old trick - I know.
Some oil washes might do the trick for the discoloring...?...
Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Terry Harper
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52


« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2008, 10:08:37 AM »

Gordon,

Iam so pleased to see this model come together. Grin Its satisfying to draw a set of plans such as these.  But its an even greater feeling to know someone is using them and using them well.

When this model is done I would like to send (with your permission) a set of photos to Mrs. Black. It was her father , O. A. Harkness, Chief Mechanical Officer for Great Northern Paper Co., who was responsible for this remarkable conversion.

O.A. was a remarkable man in his own right. He was known as the 'Admiral of the Northwoods' due to the many boats he designed and built for booming logs. He also oversaw the completion of the Tramway in 1902. This was 3000 ft. long steam powered conveyor made to carry long logs from Eagle lake to Chamberlain Lake.

The remains are still there today. Maybe one day I will get a set of drawings together for this as well.

Best regards,

Terry



Logged
Terry Harper
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52


« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2008, 10:43:54 AM »

Gordon,

One other detail of interest. Apparently these big Wisconsin engines had a habit of breaking the cylinder jug bolt tabs.

We noticed quite a few that had backwoods repairs. For instance the most common were 'L' brackets fastened to the side of the jug and the top of the crankcase. Apperently the tab that is cast as part of the jug and which the bolt holding it to the crankcase passes through would fracture.

In one extreme case we found an engine with angle iron placed across the bottom of the crankcase and top of the cylinder and clamped with a threaded rod on each side of the block. Neat detail!

Best regards,

Terry
Logged
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 745


« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2008, 11:18:17 PM »

Thanks guys.

Mark:  This truck has a lot of neat detail. The over-sized transmission and differential with it's skid cover.  The huge six-cylinder engine.  The almost seven-foot long engine cover.  And the way the bed sits up off the frame on the cast iron pedestals.  Oh, I could go on forever!  It's really a nice ride.

Marty:  The pencil idea was great, very easy to do and easy to keep it where you want it.  After I finish up the brake linkage, I will post another photo.

Terry:   Thank you for the added information.  Very interesting.  And thank you for all your help on this project.  You will get the first photos when I'm finished.  Hope you've had time to enjoy unc's annual.

Gordon Birrell
Logged
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 745


« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2008, 08:04:19 PM »

Here are two more photos of the rear end with the brake assembly completed and I have added the bed to the frame. I used a pencil on the wheels and brake drum.





Gordon Birrell
http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2008, 11:34:25 PM »

Just beautiful.

Is the chain Delrin?


Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 745


« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2008, 12:01:15 AM »

Marc

The chain is Delrin and maybe the sprockets are too.

http://www.servolink.com/
Serv-O-Link Corp.

Gordon Birrell
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5419


« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2008, 01:39:33 AM »

Way to go, Gordon. I love the worn paint and the oily grunge.

Russ
Logged
TRAINS1941
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298


« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2008, 06:06:42 AM »

Gordon

The grease and oily look on the wheels and chain excellent.
Actually it looks like the real thing on the chain the pencil treatment seems the way to go to have that look.

Jerry
Logged

Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
Scratchman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 745


« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2008, 07:19:58 PM »

Lombard Cab

I got a good start on the cab. I got more quarter round coming and will finish up the trim on the windows when it gets hear. The front wheel sets are laying on the bed. Still needs some work on the controls, dashboard, steering, and front wheels before moving on to the engine.

Gordon Birrell









http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
Logged
jacq01
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110



« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2008, 06:03:54 AM »

 
   Gordon,

    super..............  the only word coming out after seeing the progress.
   
    Uncle is right, warning everybody...... I hardly dare to put up my work anymore. Wink

    Keep up the pace, can't wait to see the engine.

   Jacq   
   
Logged

put brain in gear before putting mouth in action.
never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!