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Author Topic: weathered wood; update required  (Read 11280 times)
paulhk
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« on: February 27, 2008, 08:24:01 PM »

Dear Forum members

I am a new member, having only recently ''stumbled'' on the site; however Terrapin NGRS has been in my favourites for a while as I am a big admirer of the work being done.

Inspired by a visit to the Alishan Forest Rly in Taiwan I have returned to modelling after a few years absence, and am working in 1/45th and 1/36th scales [just to be awkward I guess]. Both n.g.

I am currently experimenting with weathering, but am struggling with my technique for weathered wood; with and without peeling/old paint.

No doubt this is an old topic for you guys, but I would certainly appreciate your tips/updates, as I currently have a couple of very ''sad'' looking 1/36th scale wagons needing a re-work.

On a quid pro quo basis, I have been working with artists' acrylics, using burnt umber as a rust base coat as it creates a good texture. Over that I have painted using artists' oils, which are then rubbed off as much as possible. This changes the texture of the burnt umber, and at the same time leaves residual colour in places where wear and tear would have left the original paint. The effect is quite pleasing, and is then further developed with dry brushing and weathering powders. Have any of you used this method already ? [I may well be in considerable danger of teaching my grandmother to suck eggs here].

If anyone is interested, I can post some photos once I get my daughter to show me how. Huh

Regards to all

Paul
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2008, 05:40:22 PM »

I would also like to see some pics when you are able.

I have a few ideas in this album:  http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/barn_and_tractor_diorama/

THere are a lot of good ideas out there: http://public.fotki.com/MarcelAckle/  see the locshuppen album.

Chuck
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2008, 07:45:39 PM »

Well Chuck I've tried your method of weathering wood from looking and reading your web site and it turned out perfect.
Now I'm building this old Tom Yorke Kit in O-Scale an will apply the same techniques again. I just hope I can get the same results.  Without a doubt if anyone follows your instructions the wood weathering comes out perfect.
Just glad that you have a web site to look at for help.

Jerry
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paulhk
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2008, 07:17:45 PM »

Thank you for the replies, and the Fotki site Chuck.

Having seen the tractor I am really not sure if posting my own photos is a good idea- truly inspirational !!

Regards

Paul
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finescalerr
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2008, 02:19:20 AM »

Post them anyway. -- Russ
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John McGuyer
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2008, 08:40:26 PM »

Post those shots Paul. Join with me in learning from these guys.

John
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2008, 02:45:52 PM »

Please do. Your choice of scales is intriguing.
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2008, 01:41:15 PM »

Paul,

Welcome top the forum, and sorry sor the late response.

I too would be interested in seeing the pics. If not to learn then at least just to further the discussion.

Chucks is probably the best method for doing a wood finish. I also like what Marcel is achieving, it is a completely different approach. One is more beautifully proto/real, while the other is wonderfully stylized/creative.

I have also had some fun and success using variations of the old Nash/Greenberg techniques....and even trying to adapt these to being done with acrylics and water colors rather than Floquil.

There are other options/approaches which may work just fine for the scale and application you are doing/needing them. Most important is to look at reference materials/photos, and think "outside the box" which are what both Chuck and Marcel do.


Cheers,

Marc
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paulhk
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2008, 10:37:06 AM »

Thanks to all for words of encouragement.

I will post once I arrange with my daughter re the technicalities.

Don't hold your breath- this is really kitchen sink modelling !!

Paul
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John McGuyer
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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2008, 10:16:33 PM »

Chuck,
I'm studying your methods and you mention using 'wet' Bragdon powders. May I ask what the 'wetting' agent is?
John
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2008, 11:05:35 AM »

Spit or plain water, whatever is handy. Sometimes water and photo-flo to make them run. Might also try detergent, or Windex, two things I have heard of being used.

CD
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http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
John McGuyer
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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2008, 10:25:47 PM »

Chuck
I'm working on a wood caboose to go with the K-27 and have been experimenting with your ideas for weathering the wood. I'm having good success and want to thank you. The Silverwood, then thinner and then paint, chipped with tape is great.  Weathering wood is something new to me. Also now have some 'knotholes ' in it.

John
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