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Author Topic: 19th Century Cornish Stable  (Read 70125 times)
granitechops
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« Reply #195 on: October 19, 2012, 03:01:32 PM »

Not been feeling well last couple of days, in fact I slept for 14 hours last night!!
But some slow progress has been made on the raftering

#1   Barge boards had to be in place this early on, as the roof will be removable & they help keep the shape & give strength

#2   Valley base probably not quite prototypical, but is below the level of the rafters & there is still the battens to add to enhance the difference

#3   View from inside, some of the beams will stay with the top floor unit for its structural strength, some will be a part of the roof structure, which would otherwise be flimsy


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #196 on: October 19, 2012, 03:04:29 PM »

Cant quite make my mind up wether in 1860 the Cornish would have used lead or zinc sheet for the valley, dont suppose it would make much difference on the model, except maybe for sheet size
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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #197 on: October 22, 2012, 11:09:57 AM »

I have experienced roof damage on models in the past when having the slates overhang fascias as here in the workshop roof,

Edit; apologies for the dust!


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« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 11:17:01 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #198 on: October 22, 2012, 11:15:47 AM »

So on this model I sought to avoid this happening by giving a solid base to the bottom edge by using black styrene sheet strip notched to give effect of individual slates as only the ends will  be visible, sufficient to be visible from below with the 2 inch over hang, but when, if, I fit a gutter very little will be seen of it




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« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 02:54:00 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #199 on: October 25, 2012, 04:47:07 AM »

# 1 Lead lining in valley, from old hanging file pockets, good quality, fine card.

# 2 Battens also fixed

# 3 as I calculated that there would be 600 glue points on the batten to rafter joint, so decided it would be quicker to use card spacers between battens rather than mark out & glue to pencil marks


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #200 on: October 30, 2012, 06:54:31 AM »

Progress has been slow, I think that putting up real slates, with nails is much easier than gluing scale ones that move when you turn your back, at least they stay where you put them!!


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #201 on: October 30, 2012, 07:14:10 AM »

valley detail
and texture/finish of slates
.75mm card stock used for slates,
acrylic black with a touch of red in different proportions to give variety in colour
then card cut to size & fixed which gave a white edge that was coloued with a black/ green acrylic along edges to soak in & then wiped off surplus before drying.
which left a under shadow along bottom edges of slates
Then sealed with a water resistant PVA slightly diluted
another edge treatment with black/green.
I found that the PVA had not thourougly dried after 3-4 hours and that wiping clean along the line of slates left a faint smear texture that looked wrong.
So damp cloth & immediately finished off wiping down the roof which although is a minimal texture definately looks much better

Incidently I have avoided the broken slate syndrome on this part of the roof, reasoning that I would probably overdo it!
result,  a raggedy type roof
Suppose I could fit a few slates with repair tags bent up over bottom edges  



Must try & get some daylight pictures


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« Last Edit: October 30, 2012, 07:47:38 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #202 on: October 30, 2012, 12:49:19 PM »

Looks good!
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« Reply #203 on: October 30, 2012, 01:44:08 PM »

Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ
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Andi Little
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« Reply #204 on: October 31, 2012, 02:02:33 AM »

Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ

(Muffled guffaw) - Very true. But which is of course a back handed compliment if ever I heard one: thoroughly well deserved of course.

Well done - great job - most excellent fortitude.
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KBO..................... Andi.
granitechops
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« Reply #205 on: October 31, 2012, 04:32:33 AM »

Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ

Yeah, but, 
I doubt if card stock, even treated would be very long lasting on a 1:1 building  Grin   Cry

Real roofing is easier,
been there done that, got the T shirt, AND the "granny's blessings"
On a full size roof  all the materials & procedures are already accepted practice
But adapting different mediums to portray the 'real' world when modelling  is much more difficult

The only easier bit is that the physical energy to lift the model slates up on to the roof is far less than on a real roof!!

The other observation to be made, from when we were into dolls house retail was that very often a model, say for example a wheelbarrow could be more expensive in model form than in full size


And thanks for the complment
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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #206 on: October 31, 2012, 04:56:53 AM »

Thanks Ray & Andi for the encouragement
The value of forums like this is not to compare my efforts to others on here, or I would be completly deflated, but to improve slowly & learn from others experience & ideas
Which I sometimes acheive, and sometimes dont   Grin
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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #207 on: November 02, 2012, 07:12:36 AM »

One thing not to overlook when cutting your own slates, is the need for exact sizes
having only a cheap bog standard cutter I finally acheived it with a rustic fence clamped to the same base that the cutter was clamped too


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #208 on: November 02, 2012, 07:16:23 AM »

couldn't resist, was cleaning out debris prior to paying attention to interior wall finish with a 3/4" paint brush, thought, looks like someone has been interupted while brushing up


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #209 on: November 02, 2012, 07:23:46 AM »

Made further progress with rest of roof and done first step of "weathering" the valley gutter
acheived by first brush applying a dirt colour acrylic, allowing 30 seconds drying time & then running a small amount of water down through as in real life to wash some of it away
Looks like the lead  joints need a bit of under shadow to dry on thoroughly first


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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