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Author Topic: 19th Century Cornish Stable  (Read 74807 times)
granitechops
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« Reply #150 on: April 29, 2012, 07:24:48 AM »

This little house is harder to do than the other one
its 1/12 scale in 1/12th scale
or 1:144


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #151 on: April 29, 2012, 07:45:21 AM »

The windows could prove difficult to do

but then again if I do a model of
1/12 of 1/12 of 1/12
that would be 1:1728
or in other words the longest dimension of that model would be just 0.1666 inches or aprox 4.23 mm

would be no problems with the windows there then,   Cheesy 
just a full stop would do,
a square one of course     Grin  Cool


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #152 on: April 29, 2012, 04:42:19 PM »

This is bringing back memories of my childhood when we (I have two sisters) used to play in the shed/garage with our father's 'stuff'. We were never officially allowed to touch his 'stuff' of course! He was a bricklayer so he had all sorts of interesting things including full bottles (not plastic containers) of hydrochloric acid etc to clean his tools. Wonderful to explore - you were always well aware of the dangerous nature of sharp edges and bottles of mysterious liquids! All of the sheds had dirt floors and endless spiders.

How are you going to model the spiders then, Don?
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
marc_reusser
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« Reply #153 on: April 29, 2012, 09:35:49 PM »

Just lovely. Great fun watching this come together, and how you are scratbuilding/creating all the various details and bits.  thanks.

Marc
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I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
michael mott
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« Reply #154 on: April 30, 2012, 09:15:10 AM »

Hi Don, checking in again, absolutely wonderful sense of reality coming through. The axes are a trick subject for sure, I use my full size splitting axe all the time, it needs a new handle, because it is getting a bit butchered at the intersection of the head and the handle. Have you thought about adding an old worn axe with a handle prepared from a bamboo skewer?

I really liked the shot in the wood storage area. and the soap box cart, scraped a few knees in my youth on one of those.

Quote
We hit a financial bump  a few months ago, & we have tried living at BELOW what we could actually afford in order to practice for when it might get worse,

Wise for sure, I just had to turn off the propane to the house heating system last week to conserve enough for the domestic hot water. The sun and the wood stove are all we are using now for heat. and the sun is doing a great job during the day. wood stove and good insulation a great job in the evening and over night.

The lake is still covered in Ice! and it is may tomorrow.

Michael



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granitechops
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« Reply #155 on: April 30, 2012, 11:19:18 AM »

This is bringing back memories of my childhood when we (I have two sisters) used to play in the shed/garage with our father's 'stuff'. We were never officially allowed to touch his 'stuff' of course! He was a bricklayer so he had all sorts of interesting things including full bottles (not plastic containers) of hydrochloric acid etc to clean his tools. Wonderful to explore - you were always well aware of the dangerous nature of sharp edges and bottles of mysterious liquids! All of the sheds had dirt floors and endless spiders.

How are you going to model the spiders then, Don?
A young friends daughter (2 1/2 )is mad on this one
Woolly & Tig   http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/woolly-and-tig/
could be big enough to model    Grin  
EDIT;-
 Actually when we were into dollshouse retailing, there was someone who did cobwebs in 1/12 in etched brass
EDIT 2;-
or DIY
http://www.ehow.com/how_2093321_make-spider-webs-dollhouse.html




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« Last Edit: April 30, 2012, 11:42:30 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #156 on: April 30, 2012, 11:30:32 AM »

Mark, thanks for watching!!
Michael,   You asked  Have you thought about adding an old worn axe with a handle prepared from a bamboo skewer?
did you mean as in blade chipped from hitting stone instead of wood,
and with a straight, quick replacement emergency handle when no shaped hickory one available? plus the back of the head burred from use as a sledge
Now there's a thought
funnily enough the mark 3 axe had a notch in the blade from the stock bar & I ground it out!!
On the grounds that it was bad workmanship or misuse of a tool

But then I remembered that once when I could not hire gas cutting gear, I bought an axe ESPECIALLY to cut the steel body off a van chassis so I could use the chassis as the base for a trailer build, like a giant tin opener.
Still got two scars on my right forearm to prove it!!!
Didnt hurt the axe though!!
« Last Edit: April 30, 2012, 11:48:01 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #157 on: April 30, 2012, 02:09:39 PM »

OK, what do you recon Michael?
Abused enough?
Shaft damaged, used to get that a lot on sledge hammer handles when breaking up cast iron objects,
blade edge chipped ( may have over done that bit)
Now, as this axe is made up from 4 layers of 60 thou styrene laminated,
I could not quite see how to get a burr on the back of the axe head
whereas with using brass or steel you can beat the burr in naturally


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #158 on: April 30, 2012, 06:56:23 PM »

Hi Don, My own personal opinion is that the handle looks great, one would need to the the "Hulk" to create such large notches in the metal of the head though. you could just file that down a little because that is of course how we sharpen the head.

Cheers Michael
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granitechops
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« Reply #159 on: May 01, 2012, 12:24:10 PM »

Been out most of the day, shopping etc, but before we went I had a go at doing a window for the little stable cott.
Took some double sided tape, stuck it to a base of cereal box card afixed some microstrtip to it to form a rectangle larger than the window opening, & mounting a piece of 60 thou clear acrylic, the size of the window opening on to it with solvent, lifted it off the tape, trimmed the strip, turned it over refixed to tape & stuck two very thin microstrips across to form the panes

not sure, looks a little clunky,
although the windows are less than 10mm x 10mm
oh, but it does have a window cill   Grin


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #160 on: May 01, 2012, 02:10:54 PM »

filed down blade a bit


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #161 on: May 02, 2012, 07:49:10 AM »

The Humbrol tin is almost scale for a 10 litre paint bucket! Just change the name?
Oh, much simpler than that Ian, got one somewhere that has the big print, name, obscured with paint runs & only the small print details left showing!!

Love it when things transfer straight accross from real to scale
Ah, found it, an old Airfix paint pot thats thinner & taller with the brand obliterated but small print left


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #162 on: May 02, 2012, 07:52:04 AM »

Some 60 thou styrene sheet, plus some styrene tube.
Plus some card tube .  . .
and


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« Last Edit: May 02, 2012, 07:54:07 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #163 on: May 02, 2012, 02:08:10 PM »

A chunk of balsa,
a brass pin,
a small nut,

drill a few holes


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #164 on: May 05, 2012, 02:57:47 PM »

Take a length of Hornby 00 track feed wire
plus a larger diameter piece of wire insulation


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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