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Author Topic: 19th Century Cornish Stable  (Read 73492 times)
granitechops
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« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2012, 01:35:20 PM »

Step 2
draw up individual walls with measurements
 give each an an identity 'a' 'b' etc.




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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2012, 01:39:37 PM »

Very neat.

The front vaguely reminds me of some guys place in Shropshire. He too has been working on his for what must be decades. Grin

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granitechops
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« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2012, 01:44:40 PM »

draw each piece to scale on card & cut out to see if they look right
( brown bits are remains of parcel tape used for holding together for mock up, but did not have camera to hand )

This also allowed me to layout parts either way up to get best use of thin ply that was to hand

[ due to being in the " straights of the times" ie. feeling the pinch, it is planned that NOTHING will be bought in for this project, if I can help it, a work round attitude will be employed ]
The ply used came from a piece of furniture no longer in gainful employment!


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« Last Edit: March 14, 2012, 01:46:40 PM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2012, 01:56:27 PM »

 A base was formed out of polystyrene sheet laminated with cereal cardboard ( see details in The Packing Shed )

http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1191.90

reply No. 96


then the plan was drawn on
with the walls being given their identity
So I dont get TOO confused




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« Last Edit: March 14, 2012, 01:58:10 PM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2012, 02:01:20 PM »

Cut out parts
And find somewhere to photograph them
big models in small rooms some times proves a challenge




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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2012, 02:12:37 PM »

The intention with this building is to give the impression of scale thickness walls ( with in reason)without weight
The packing shed was made out of 3/4 chipboard & is quite heavy, so I plan this one to be a lot lighter, so the walls are planned to be hollow, with the outer skin of ply for structural strength, & with card inner walls, with zigzag card inserts like some cheap interior doors were( are? ) made
My motto is "belts AND braces" so all essential joints are to be reinforced with corners ( hidden within the wall structure), If the weather had been kinder I might have gone outside & ripped this corner down in half ( too much this size & I wont save much weight)


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2012, 02:20:32 PM »

As I had a broken dolls house window it the roundtwit box, I cut it down to the size I required & rebuilt it ( recycling, Yeah )

Now the prtoblem with dolls house windows is that they are designed to sit on TOP of the outside wall, which in Cornwall is not realistic ( although I notice a lot of american houses built out of siding DO have that style
Demonstrated here with some spare door trims


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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2012, 02:23:51 PM »

So the window front was sanded a bit to produce a flat surface rather than the architrave shape, and it was glued to the INSIDE of the opening





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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2012, 02:27:24 PM »

When set the wall was turned over & the return was filled in with some strip wood, still needs gaps around filling in but I will leave that till I get to the wall surface which requires a whitewashed rough stone finish


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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2012, 02:37:52 PM »

View through the trees courtesy of str**t view
Notice the chimney, without knowing I made one just like it last week!!
the houses behind go up the hill




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Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2012, 06:54:08 AM »

Now the eagle eyed among you may have noticed an anomaly in the size of the base
it was originaly going to be 18" wide by 26" long, but due to the fact that the piece of polystyrene that was laminated to form the base was only 18" by 24" the building has been resized down to suit
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Don in sunny Devon, England
granitechops
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« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2012, 02:08:57 AM »

Before I get too far along in assembling the walls, I need to settle some facts about the original interior of a 19th century stable/ loose box.
While the servants part of the building would be very basic, the rich tended to lavish resources on their horses

So questions for any Equestrians amongst us
The outside of the cottage ( which is what we as kids called it) was rough stone whitewashed over
But would the interior of the loose box be smoother, so less ledges for dust debris & bugs to lodge? ( and easier to whitewash)

 Now I have seen many hay feeders/ racks on stable walls, and while a rickety woodworm eaten one might be appropriate for a rustic farm stable, I feel an industrialist in the mining industry might have either got his blacksmith to knock one up, or bought a metal one instead. Whatever, I favour the semi quarter round type that will go in a corner, as with the design of the doors & windows in the box, it would seem the most practical solution
Thought? ideas? anyone?

Although the building will be put to a 21st Cent use, its origins & fingerprint will be 3rd quarter 19th Cent  
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 02:13:15 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2012, 02:21:01 AM »

A problem with remembering details of the stable interior is that back then ( when the world was young) there was no electric in there, and there was only one very small window facing east, the main door was not opened unless Dad was working in there. So it was dark without details being obvious.
One would imagine that before the barn type door was fitted for car access, the original stable type split door would have afforded light & ventilation
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 02:25:18 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #28 on: March 16, 2012, 03:34:01 AM »

Two of stable walls joined, right hand still just ply,
left hand one skinned with cereal card, & sealed with white pva, & acrylic paint mix



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« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 03:38:10 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
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« Reply #29 on: March 16, 2012, 03:43:36 AM »

another coat of acrylic/pva mix
{ colours, when out shopping I look out for acrylic paint that has been drastically reduced in price, whatever the colour, as then its almost given away, so I use them as an under coat}

Right wall spacing strips are ripped out of old furniture shelf wood, so that depth is uniform



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Don in sunny Devon, England
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