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Author Topic: Need ideas for making cross sections  (Read 13653 times)
finescalerr
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« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2012, 01:36:53 PM »

I am nonplussed. -- Russ
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JESTER
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« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2012, 03:07:21 PM »

Had to look that one up! I'm doing my best!!  Cheesy

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In recent North American English nonplussed has come to mean "unimpressed".[1] In 1999, this was considered a neologism, ostensibly from "not plussed", although "plussed" by itself is not a recognized English word.


I am nonplussed. -- Russ
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finescalerr
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« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2012, 01:56:06 AM »

Well, I thought "nonplussed" meant "baffled", not "unimpressed". I am impressed and was merely joking about the lighthearted nature of the model. -- Russ
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JESTER
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« Reply #33 on: March 13, 2012, 09:25:12 AM »

I'm just messing with you Russ!  Grin

I knew what you meant. I hope to wrap this up this week/end and ship it off next Monday!

Thanks to Chuck Doan and Marc Reusser for some painting advice!!
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JESTER
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« Reply #34 on: March 13, 2012, 09:35:21 AM »

More work on the cone area. I used some gouache paint to get the streaks under the bolts


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finescalerr
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« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2012, 01:08:44 PM »

Satisfactory.

Someday I gotta learn how to do that tricky paint stuff ... except that in the period I model they hadn't invented metal or paint yet.

Russ
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JESTER
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« Reply #36 on: March 13, 2012, 01:19:13 PM »

I'm still learning. Trying to remember what paint goes on top of what and what reacts with what is still hard for me to get straight.

I really want to try and make a wooden rocket all weathered up. I might try that next.

What types of models do you make? No metal?? I bet you make a hell of a Stone Wheel!  Grin

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Satisfactory.

Someday I gotta learn how to do that tricky paint stuff ... except that in the period I model they hadn't invented metal or paint yet.

Russ
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finescalerr
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« Reply #37 on: March 14, 2012, 02:27:59 AM »

I was half kidding. I generally model the era from about 1890 to 1910, pre-automobile. I mostly build structures and the occasional railroad car but have been know to stray into gas mechanical and diesel locos, HO scale rolling stock, and even (in my wild and misspent youth) 1:35 scale military. -- Russ
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JESTER
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« Reply #38 on: March 14, 2012, 09:42:18 AM »

I've always loved early tractors and odd mechanical farm equipment. After seeing some of the amazing work here, I'm definitely inspired to do a few vehicles. Too bad I have to sleep!!  Shocked

I got some more work done yesterday.

Here's a pic to see the size of it. My daughter said "hurry, this thing is heavy!"


I added an access panel to the tube area and added more weathering.


I still need to blend the chipping, highlight some areas and airbrush some rust.


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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2012, 10:26:37 AM »

Roughing in the shape with spray foam = Great Idea!
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JESTER
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« Reply #40 on: March 14, 2012, 11:50:44 AM »

Ken, I asked him about it and he said he used foam sheets for this part. I thought it was the expandable foam.

He's used that on other parts. I asked if it was the type from the can and he said no because that stuff isn't dense enough and the core never dries. You can see the expandable foam in action HERE

Roughing in the shape with spray foam = Great Idea!
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JESTER
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« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2012, 09:17:39 AM »

Added some airbrushing and an overall dusting layer. Thanks for the advice Marc!!



Here's all my rockets in one pic:


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JESTER
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« Reply #42 on: March 27, 2012, 07:56:12 AM »

On this project I used some Winsor & Newton Gouche for most of the rivet streaks. I also used some Vallejo, Tamiya and Pollyscale paints. I originally painted the goggles Orange and used the hairspray technique which was awesome but the Orange was thinned to much so I went with white.

Here are pics of the final piece. I painted the goggles white and did some metal effects on the fins.


Backyard Shot:


Here's the fin/engine view. The engine was the back part of the original toy.


Top view.


Here is the original toy's creator Nathan Hamill:


Here are some 3D red/cyan anaglyph images before I painted the goggles:






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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #43 on: March 27, 2012, 09:04:34 AM »

Very nice!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Wesleybeks
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« Reply #44 on: March 27, 2012, 10:34:57 AM »

Flippen cool toy Tim. I love it.
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Kind Regards
Wesley

Modelling in sunny South Africa
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