Westlake Publishing Forums
September 23, 2019, 01:01:55 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: old plastered walls  (Read 9090 times)
jacq01
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110



« on: January 31, 2008, 08:01:59 AM »


    Here a methode to make old plastered walls. The wall on the photo is a close up in H0 of the blacksmith watermill.


 



  The wall is a hydrocal brick embossed wall, where the recesses and openings, after wetting the casting, were carved using a # 11 Xacto blade. 
  The casting was painted directly with enamel washes to give the bricks the required character.
  The next day, a layer of gesso was applied in small patches to prevent early drying. 
  Directly after the application plaster powder was seeved over the gesso patches.
  When dry, excess powder is brushed of with a soft brush. When the required part is completely covered,  the gesso is cut/chipped with the toothpick/Xacto blade, screwdriver, without scratching the bricks, a bit like Marc's description of making paint chippings.  The gesso comes of at random, more or less exposing bricks.

  It is also possible to color the powdered layer and apply a second layer of gesso and powder. When creating loose plaster, different colors will become visible, suggesting an age old wall.  Breaking up such a casting and using the rubble to make a collapsed wall offers many possibilties for a military or abandoned railway diorama / lay out part

 Regards
  Jacq

   
Logged

put brain in gear before putting mouth in action.
never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5448


« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2008, 02:28:27 PM »

Thank you for describing that technique so well, Jacq. I hope it also will inspire others to educate us. These posts are fascinating. -- Russ
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2008, 02:54:18 PM »

Jacq,

Thanks for the great information. Very interesting, and beautiful result.  I will definitely have to give this a try.


There is a sim technique that can be used for doing old craked and damaged concrete paving. The initial pour/layer has some small grains of silica/sand added it (to represent the aggregate in the concrete)...this is then allowed to dry, and can be stained as needed. A second very thin layer of just plaster is then applied over it, and finished or sanded smooth (but not enough to show the first layer)...this top layer can then be chipped and flaked off in areas to expose the coarser ("inner core") part of the concrete. I will try and do an SBS of this as part of an upcoming project.

Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
Nurser
Guest
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2008, 05:13:15 AM »

Very nice stuff Jacq, oh I wish that people worked to these standards whenever they made a model layout. As you explain, it's not too difficult, it just needs care and forethought.  Cheap materials, no big secret, just care.
Thanks for the post
Hector
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2008, 11:56:24 AM »

Thank you for the lesson on advanced scenery making. Your students are beholding to you.

John
Logged
macsair
Guest
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2008, 11:00:28 AM »

 Great stuff, kinda looks like my garage.............(Grin)
Logged
John McGuyer
Guest
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2008, 02:31:37 PM »

No Mac, except for the motorcycles, your garage (aka The Cave) is more weathered.

John
Logged
jacq01
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110



« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2008, 11:21:34 AM »


     >> your garage (aka The Cave) is more weathered. <<   photo's photo's, I like reference pictures  Grin Grin Grin Grin.

    When there is an interest, I will show topic for topic my H0 layout with all ( simple) techniques used to
    built the buildings and the landscape, including this functional basaltworks.
   

     

     

     All six silo's work and waggons can be loaded and switched with a remote controller. I often stand between or behind the public with the controls and it is fun to watch the reactions that all is working without someone around. There ishowever a problem. At home and in the mornings at shows, all functions correct and the balast flows freely, sometimes to freely. After noon however, the material is not flowing so freely anymore. Long searching and fundamental thinking turned up the reason. All those folks bring along a lot of moisture and the humidity in ahall runs up very quickly when a certain saturation point has been reached. Now I have to look for a scale size material that is not affected, I think impossible.

  Jacq
     

     

   
   
Logged

put brain in gear before putting mouth in action.
never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!