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Author Topic: 1:48n3 Lima Shay #122  (Read 26831 times)
RoughboyModelworks
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« on: January 23, 2008, 06:41:05 PM »

I've started a thread on the Roughboy Blog http://www.roughboy.net/shinola/ chronicling the build of 1:48n3 Lima Shay #122 as run on the Mich-Cal Lumber Company as their #2. To give you a taste, I've attached a couple of perspective renderings of the rear pilot beam, one from the front, the second from the rear. The wood components (to be fabricated from Swiss Pear) are rendered as translucent plastic to illustrate the construction. I'm currently working on the drawings for the front pilot beam. Progress on the build will be published in the thread, so if you're interested, stop by for a look.

Paul


* ShayPilotBeamFrontSmwtmk.jpg (71.1 KB, 500x500 - viewed 717 times.)

* ShayPilotBeamRearSmwtmk.jpg (86.55 KB, 500x500 - viewed 719 times.)
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 01:01:28 PM by Roughboy » Logged
John McGuyer
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« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2008, 09:31:58 PM »

This will be fun to watch as I'm doing roughly the same thing on the 1/20.3 K27. Made the beam as suggested here on the forum from pearwood and I love the stuff.

John
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2008, 11:15:57 AM »

Nice start, Bill. I have the plastic "generic" version of this Shay. I hope to learn a lot.

Chuck
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2008, 12:37:51 PM »

Bill, this should be very interesting to watch you do this.  Plus the fact that the Shay is my favorite Engine.  Can't wait for the next post.

Jerry
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George Carlin
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2008, 02:56:55 PM »

Thanks for the good words guys. I've just posted an update on the Roughboy blog http://www.roughboy.net/shinola/ showing the perspective renderings of the front pilot beam. Next update will show the preparation and machining of the pear wood beam pieces.

Paul
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 01:01:03 PM by Roughboy » Logged
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2008, 10:15:00 PM »

I've just posted an update on the shay project on the Roughboy blog http://www.roughboy.net/shinola/. I've included the teaser image below showing the mill set-up to machine a fixture that will be used to help machine the brackets that mount the pear wood pilot beams to the frame rails. Full details and more photos on the blog.

Paul


* MillSetupSm.jpg (125.91 KB, 385x289 - viewed 745 times.)
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 01:00:37 PM by Roughboy » Logged
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2008, 04:04:06 PM »

Another update has been posted on the Roughboy blog http://www.roughboy.net/shinola/ on the pilot beam bracket machining. Teaser image below shows brackets after machining and ready for the next step. Thumb & finger give a sense of scale. More photos and details on the blog.

Paul


* MachBrackets2.jpg (55.12 KB, 408x264 - viewed 692 times.)
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 01:00:07 PM by Roughboy » Logged
marc_reusser
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2008, 01:29:38 PM »

Beautiful!

....almost retentive Grin Grin

Marc
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M-Works
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2009, 12:57:56 PM »

Since I'm back working on this project again, decided to bump the thread. Hopefully there won't be too many objections. It was also an opportunity to test the macro-focusing ability of a new digital camera. Finally replaced the old floppy-drive era beast I'd been using for years.  Smiley

I just finished drilling out the bolt hole in each bracket. The bolt (.020" dia. phosphor bronze rod) will fix the bracket to the pear wood end beams. I machined the short bolt end off the top of the cast-in NBW on the bracket to provide a flat surface for drilling. Then, using good old eye-sight (enhanced with lots of magnifiers) I located and drilled a #71 hole through the center of each cast-in nut. Photo below shows the drilling in process. I've removed all the finished brackets from the machining fixture and am currently cleaning off any excess solder. Once complete, I'll install the phosphor bronze bolts, the ends of which are threaded as an added detail (madness!). More pictures to come in the next post.

Paul




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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2009, 12:39:16 AM »

Just amazing the kind ow work you and John produce. I always think of what a shame it is that so often when people see the finished model made like this, they have no idea of the amount of work and skill went into making it.


Marc
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In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2009, 08:28:34 PM »

Thanks Marc. You're right, with the exception of a few other equally twisted souls here, most people have no concept of the amount of work and effort it takes to build these models. That fact is forcibly brought home if you have ever tried to make a living at modelmaking. With the exception of a very few exceptional and lucky builders, no one can expect to be paid fairly for their work. I expect I speak for all of us when I say we do it for the love of doing it and the challenges we set ourselves. I always try to push the limits, that's where the excitement and adventure reside.

Paul
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finescalerr
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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2009, 03:43:53 AM »

I don't see how any modeler could earn enough to survive unless he consistently gets big bucks from corporate clients. The level of craftsmanship and artistry I see on this forum exceeds the vast majority of what I've seen in museums and of "professional" efforts. I still remember that exquisite little 1:48 critter you showed me ten or more years ago. -- Russ
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jacq01
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2009, 05:21:32 AM »

 In Lahnstein Marcel Ackle and I discussed this matter till deep in the night.
 "What is it that makes one model stand out against another" ? 
 This question gave the feeling that the personal involvement in the creating proces is the most important factor.
 Items that are built with love ( from the hart) DO stand out, they go beyond museum or professional quality.

A "professional" is always compromising as time and money are deciding factors in his "manufacturing" proces.

 I can only built something to MY satisfaction when I understand it and am in the mental state to concentrate on it
 A competition can be a catalist to start an item, it will never influence my own feeling of satisfaction. If one compromises there, it will always show.
I remember a similar discussion in Jacq's logging project started by Russ based on a phrase, a word. It resulted in a lot of posts from many directions.

 Therefore thanks Uncle for the forum, it attracted a number of modelers that understand the ever shifting  limits and challenges, as Paul described so well, without any feeling of competition or fear of ridicule. 

 With this recognition in mind, does the rest realy matter ?

 Jacq

« Last Edit: January 30, 2009, 05:27:38 AM by jacq01 » Logged

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John McGuyer
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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2009, 09:54:10 AM »

Paul,
I see you too have discovered those carbide circuit board drills that don't move around so much when you drill those tiny little holes.

John
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2009, 08:12:32 PM »

John, those are great bits. They are almost all I use anymore. I bought a couple sets of them in 1994 and am still using them. As long as you run them at the right speed and feed slowly, they'll cut cleanly and accurately through almost anything.

You're right Jacq. A successful model has an indescribable quality, that goes beyond technical accomplishment, that could best be defined as soul. I too believe it comes from the heart and soul commitment of the builder.

Thanks Russ for the comment on the critter. That was a favorite little project. It was built as an operating model so some compromises were made in chassis detailing. To the best of my knowledge it is still chugging merrily along. Unfortunately I don't have any good photos of it. There was an article about it published in the Gazette in '95 I believe. Those photos were pretty good, but didn't really capture the subtle coloring or some of my favorite details. There are a lot of models I've done that I'd like to revisit with a digital camera  Wink

Paul
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