Westlake Publishing Forums
February 18, 2020, 06:02:51 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 20
  Print  
Author Topic: 1/35 Paper Structure Vignette  (Read 144250 times)
mad gerald
Guest
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2011, 02:40:43 PM »

... suitable scale bricks in different scales can be purchased here: http://english.miniaturziegel.de/bricks.xhtml

... but making an educated guess - this source has most certainly been already mentioned in some other thread?

Kind regards
« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 02:45:18 PM by mad gerald » Logged
artizen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 306



WWW
« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2011, 03:31:36 PM »

Marc - have you looked on here? http://www.mk35.com/index.php?page=shop.browse&category_id=12&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1&lang=en

Czech supplier - English language website. Interesting stuff for you?
Logged

Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
jacq01
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110



« Reply #32 on: May 25, 2011, 04:05:09 PM »


 
Quote
Czech supplier

  Ian, you are refering to the french MK35 site.

  Jacq
Logged

put brain in gear before putting mouth in action.
never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #33 on: May 25, 2011, 04:30:34 PM »

Ian; I am familiar with that site, they do have interesting stuff.

Gerald; thanks, that is a good link as well. I would be interested in seeing what finished wall of those would look like. I may have to see if there are any in the rubbish bin next time I am at a copy/printing shop where they do comb binding.

Nick; please do tell what I did wrong with the inside corner (am curious, not being sarcastic), I alternated the brick lap, and thought I matched the reference photos quality of construction









This project has to be completely built from paper, as those are the basic rules for the "challenge" in Russ's mag called "Build a Paper Shed".....I am (as usual for one that doesn't play well with others) trying to stretch and slightly distort it by only doing a falsefront/vignette, and pushing it to try and prove to myself that I can create a scene out of paper that will look up to par, or near, as good as one built using the typical combination of materials like styrene, plaster, scale bricks, wood, etc. It is for me an exercise on building my skill with the material, and learning something new.

Marc
« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 04:46:23 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
shropshire lad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1475


« Reply #34 on: May 25, 2011, 05:42:02 PM »

Marc,

   It seems to me that you changed the bond on the main bit of wall from ,essentially, half bond to quarter bond when coming out of the internal corner . If you had moved the bricks on the even rows (second , fourth , sixth etc. from bottom ) further into the corner , or cut them shorter , the bond would have matched the other face .
  I would have also liked to see you continue the header courses around the two corners . This would have made a more interesting wall . I find stretcher bond so boring .

  Of course , I didn't know that you were using these photos for reference when I made my comment so what you have done may well match up with the brickwork in  the photos ( I can't really see that well) .My comment was just an observation put in my usual delicate way !

  Still ,when it comes to brickwork , anything goes . There will be a prototype for every eventuality ,

  Nick
Logged
Barney
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1048


« Reply #35 on: May 25, 2011, 06:13:32 PM »

Have you tried Lego Bricks?
Logged
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 280



« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2011, 01:01:34 AM »

To mount the stones easier (see link by mad gerald) I had milled a mounting plate in which the individual tiles were glued.










In the original bridgehead, the stones were not dance so much.
In addition, the distance between the rows of blocks with 0.8 mm was still too big!
I like the machined version better for this purpose.



Model parts are put together only loosely. The corners have to be reworked.


Here again the direct comparison of the original bricks masonry wall


The individual stones are often curved slightly due to the manufacturing process.

and the milled version.



The grooves are now only 0.5 mm thick, with the same stone size, which will benefit the whole picture.

Der Ma▀stab ist 1:22,5.

... to be honest, I dreaded also about to install more than 25,000 stones.
That's why I finally decided on the milling machine.
That doesn┤t mean that I will make no further attempts with single brick built.

« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 01:05:17 AM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2011, 01:29:49 AM »

Frithjof,

I think the end result of your milled bricks looks great. it reaaly feels and looks like a well built brick wall. I also like that you added some surface nicks and texture, makes it almost indistinguishable from a photo of the real thing.

Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5548


« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2011, 02:00:38 AM »

Until I read the text, I thought Frithjof's milled brickwork was actually 1:1 scale individual bricks.

And that brings up an interesting situation: Most brick walls I have seen, even old ones, are pretty well built with an essentially level surface. Sometimes the mortar erodes or the bricks are cracked or chipped but the brick faces are on the same plane. Frithjof's wall looks very typical of that and, depending on the coloration he chose, could represent a wall anywhere from 30 to 120 years old.

Other brick walls have more "character" -- protruding bricks, broken ones, bricks whose faces are slightly below the surface -- more like what Marc seems to want.

I suspect a laser or CNC mill could mimic either given the right "artwork" but individual bricks might better represent a poorly built or eroded wall. The trick would be to combine both approaches to reduce the need for hundreds of individual pieces. Does anyone have a brilliant idea?

Russ
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #39 on: May 26, 2011, 02:21:16 AM »

I picked up the re-cut bricks today (the top sheet is the new ones). I made some changes to the layout before re-cutting, such as making the connecting tabs smaller, and having a couple of rows of brick "ends" included.




Not being in the mood to build the building wall substructure, I gerabbed a sheet of some kind of art paper I had laying around, that was the proper thickness, and made the couple of clay barrel roof tiles I wanted for the scene.

Left to Right: Shape as cut from the paper, formed tile, two tiles with base color coats.




To form the tile, the cut piece was soaked in a mix of water and matte-medium, till thoroughly wet, then formed over and old paint brush, and dried with a blow-dryer. Once dry, the underside was coated with a layer of ACC, to help it keep its shape. Once ACC was dru a small hole/slot was drilled in the top of the narrow end of the tile (this is where the wire hanger would be installed to hold the tile in place on the roof).

The four finished tiles with some moss and crud (they came from the north side of the roof  Grin).




I should probably have used a smother and less porus paper for these...but this is what was within reach and was the proper thickness.

Marc
« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 02:24:07 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
mad gerald
Guest
« Reply #40 on: May 26, 2011, 02:41:28 AM »


Gerald; thanks, that is a good link as well. I would be interested in seeing what finished wall of those would look like ...  

... here is an example of a wall of the first chicken shack, structurally finished, but no mortar, no weathering and no weathered wooden beams (representing the framework) added:

approx. 200 bricks (felt like I had placed about 750 bricks), each one individual treated (surface nicks/texture) and glued in place ...



« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 02:53:28 PM by mad gerald » Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #41 on: May 26, 2011, 03:02:25 AM »

Gerald,

The shed looks good, but I was wondering about a wall made of "bricks" made from the punched hole pieces.  Smiley

Marc
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
mad gerald
Guest
« Reply #42 on: May 26, 2011, 03:14:24 AM »

The shed looks good, but I was wondering about a wall made of "bricks" made from the punched hole pieces.  Smiley

...  Embarrassed ... ooops - sorry for my misunderstanding ... did not collect or punched respectively any gray "chip board bricks" yet ...
Logged
Barney
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1048


« Reply #43 on: May 26, 2011, 04:15:49 AM »

More bricks for thought. A range of bricks available from Richard Stacy Miniature Brick and Stone Products  - www.richardstacey.com he offers an excellent mail order service and supplies bricks in 1/12th - 1/19th and 1/24th scales. The bricks are easy to cut and I have used cut down 1/24 brick slips for 1/35th scale.Another useful product he supplies is "Versi Slips" a card that is brick textured on both sides it come in brick sizes for 1/12th - 1/19th and 1/24th is easy to cut and resize to other scales . Corner bricks and Stone are available in all scales.Photo 1 shows 1/19th scale (16mm to the Foot)
 


* re3.jpg (186.3 KB, 900x783 - viewed 1773 times.)
Logged
Barney
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1048


« Reply #44 on: May 26, 2011, 04:21:21 AM »

More Bricks showing 1/24th and 1/19th scale


* r03.jpg (184.08 KB, 800x711 - viewed 1823 times.)
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 20
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!