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Author Topic: Compared Wood Weathering Techniques  (Read 5167 times)
mad gerald
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« on: April 27, 2011, 05:15:23 AM »

G'day all,

I permanently try to improve my modelling skills to approach finescale modelling ...  Grin

So I recently re-tried two different wood weathering techniques, to compare the results I can achieve using them:

One method (left), similar to the one used i. e. by Marcel Ackle, the other method (right) similar to the one used i. e. by Marc Reusser.

Therefore I took two limewood strips.

Left:
1. softly treated with a wire brush
2. coloured with instant stain (first darkgray, then "my special blend": 2 parts "oak dark", 1 part "dark gray" and 3 parts water
3. coated with highly watered down water colour (mainly white, with a little black/gray), followed (wet in wet) by another coat of green and/or brown watercolour, dabbing the woodstrip gently with a tissue in case of using too much water
4. coated with turpentine, left nearly half a day in the sun for drying
5. coloured with acrylic paint (wet in wet): carmine red, mahogany brown, black and white
6. using masking tape to remove little areas of the acrylic paint again
7. finishing with some coat of highly watered down water colour again (shades of gray, white, brown and green)

right
1. softly treated with a wire brush
2. coloured with cheap acrylic paint (as I don't have vallejos): greenish brown, mahogany brown and white, followed (wet in wet) by a coat of highly watered down black acrylic colour
3. coated with turpentine, left nearly half a day in the sun for drying
4. coloured with acrylic paint (wet in wet): carmine red, mahogany brown, black and white
5. using masking tape to remove little areas of the acrylic paint again
6. finishing with some coat of highly watered down water colour again (shades of gray, white, brown and green)

Bild 12-0007


Bild 12-0008


Well, I am not really satisfied with the result on the right. At first, I missed the right moment for removing the acrylic colour with the tape (too late, could only hardly be done), the reddish colour coat is not nice/red enough and may be, I did not use this technique frequently enough ...

I really like the result on the left, may be, I tried it enough or may be, this method even suits me more ...  Huh

So now I'm going to make a new door too for the new chickenshack (in progress) ...

In case of interest, earlier attempts (and the whole report with fotos) can be found on my website *click* ... unfortunately in German (sorry for the inconvenience) ...

Kind regards
« Last Edit: April 27, 2011, 05:24:11 AM by mad gerald » Logged

lab-dad
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2011, 06:57:55 AM »

I think they both have promise / use.
May be using 75% of the "Left" and 25% of the "Right"? would give some subtle variation?

Another possibility is to use Gordon's pastel technique too..........
-Marty
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2011, 10:49:42 PM »

I really like the colors you achieved on the initial staining process -- both the gray board and the browner one.

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mad gerald
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 02:25:40 AM »

I really like the colors you achieved on the initial staining process -- both the gray board and the browner one.

... thx ...  Smiley

... but the wood strip on the right is not treated with instant wood stain, only coloured with acrylic paint: greenish brown, mahogany brown and white, followed (wet in wet) by a coat of highly watered down black acrylic colour ...
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