Westlake Publishing Forums
October 22, 2019, 12:27:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Painting scribed wood?  (Read 6166 times)
EZnKY
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 364



« on: January 26, 2011, 08:21:14 PM »

Okay you experts, I need help.
I really like the ease and precision of scribed wood siding for certain kinds of cars, but I hate the look when I paint it.  Too uniform, and because of the woodgrain overlapping from "board" to "board", it never seems convincing to me.  So I've been experimenting with some pre-shading similar to what armor and plane modelers do under their finish coats.

Basically I've stained the scribed wood with different shades; SilverWood, BlackWood, and various combinations of the two.  Once that's dry I've airbrushed thinned paint over the stained wood.

What do you think?

Anyone else dealt with this successfully using other methods?


* Shading 1.jpg (193.03 KB, 1080x1200 - viewed 619 times.)

* Shading 2.jpg (149.17 KB, 471x1121 - viewed 606 times.)
Logged

Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
darrylhuffman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2011, 10:08:56 PM »

One technique I have used is to slice the scribed siding into several pieces representing 3 or 4 or 5 boards and then regluing them together in a random pattern.

I also will take my Xacto knife and really scuff up a board here and there.

You can put an undercoat on of different colors and shades of color on each board and then put your final coat on lightly so the variations show through.
Logged

Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com
The search for someone else to blame is always succcessful.
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5465


« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2011, 02:51:22 AM »

The stain method may vary the darkness of each board but the grain pattern still may be evident. You could prime and sand the wood before staining and painting to minimize that problem.

Personally, I gave up on scribed wood some time ago and now use styrene, paper, or individual boards.

Russ
Logged
mabloodhound
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 404



« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2011, 08:54:40 AM »

I personally like the shading method.   
I have used it with some success and even though it changes the final finish color somewhat, I think it is more realistic.
I know Russ likes the board on board but for me, scribed wood is normally my choice.   
There are only so many skills some of us can handle and one piece at a time isn't one of them for me. Cool
Logged

Dave Mason
D&GRR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
A people that values its privileges above its principles will soon lose both.~Dwight D. Eisenhower
EZnKY
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 364



« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2011, 10:25:12 PM »

Thanks everyone - it sounds like this ground has been covered before. 
I've been fairly pleased with the outcome of the tests, especially with lighter colors like yellow and white.

Russ - I agree the grain can still be an issue.  On my tests I sanded the wood very smooth before applying the stains.  Then I sealed the wood and sanded again.  And then sanded again after applying the paint.
Kind of makes it sound easy to use individual boards...
Logged

Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
DaKra
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 596


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2011, 08:45:38 PM »

I also use scribed wood, I dislike board by board for anything but total dilapidation.  But I've been getting away from using stains on it, due to the overlapping grain problem, and also due to the unrealistic and monotone colors resulting from the usual stains, like a&i, boot polish, minwax etc.    

I'm now using a grain-obscuring primer paint over wood, then paint and texture over the primer, to look like weathered wood again.   It sounds insane, but I'm getting very good results and good coloring, which I hadn't been able to get with stained, then painted wood.

I will post a SBS on this when I finish the relevant model.

Dave

    
Logged

VectorCut.com
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5465


« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 03:24:39 AM »

Please do post the SBS. But, in the meantime, is there an advantage of your method over, for example, primed styrene? -- Russ
Logged
DaKra
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 596


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2011, 07:39:02 AM »

Russ,

For me, the main advantage of using wood/plywood is I can laser engrave and cut it to specs.   Results with styrene aren't as crisp.   Also acrylic paint grips the wood better, and there is a subtle organic texture to wood, even after priming.   In HO, the slight texture is ideal for structures, but if I were making rolling stock, I would probably use cardstock instead of wood, to better represent milled and finished planks.     

Dave
Logged

VectorCut.com
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!