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Author Topic: Feldbahnmodule with ship  (Read 144804 times)
fspg2
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« Reply #405 on: January 05, 2019, 02:36:01 PM »

Hello Kim,

Below the module is the drive motor for the lifting bridge.
Have a look here.
I hope that the module no longer serves as a resonator due to the insulation.

It continued with the area to the right and left of the western bridgehead.

Modul-Montage_017 (fspg2)



Several strips of Styrodur were cut to a 60 ° miter and glued together with waterproof wood glue.
After drying, they were further cut into shape with a craft knife.


As already shown on 13.06.2008, the terrain was marked covered with Molto Holz Universal Spachtel Plus .

After drying, a hard surface results, which remains slightly flexible and unlike gypsum does not break.


Modul-Montage_019 (fspg2)



The plywood wall plate left below the stairs was glued and fixed with Tesakrepp and aluminum weights to dry.


Modul-Montage_020 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_021 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_022 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_024 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_025 (fspg2)

« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 03:59:02 PM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
finescalerr
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« Reply #406 on: January 05, 2019, 02:38:06 PM »

Impressive. -- Russ
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fspg2
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« Reply #407 on: January 09, 2019, 01:03:07 AM »

After about 10 minutes of drawing work and 6 minutes of milling time, I could glue these four parts together.

You might think that I want to build a small banquette ...

Modul-Montage_28 (fspg2)


... maybe with a little too big legs ....

Modul-Montage_29 (fspg2)


... in principle, it's a kind of desk, but it should be used only twice.

Modul-Montage_26 (fspg2)



Each of the sandstone pedestals (from about 1950 it was concrete) of the two bridgeheads had a small pipe in the upper area.


Modul-Montage_27 (fspg2)



When it rained, the water collected in the recessed center of the pedestal and then could drain through the small tube.

To get both holes at the same angle, this little "bench" helped.


Modul-Montage_30 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_31 (fspg2)



For better hold the two 1.8mm brass tubes while sandblasting, I pulled them onto a 0.3mm brass wire.


Modul-Montage_32 (fspg2)



Then they were mounted with a new UV adhesive.


Modul-Montage_33 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_34 (fspg2)



Modul-Montage_35 (fspg2)

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Frithjof
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« Reply #408 on: January 09, 2019, 09:35:08 AM »

I can´t tell you how much I enjoy this thread!

Would love to see a picture with all the different bits and pieces arranged according to your master plan.

Thanks for sharing!
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Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
finescalerr
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« Reply #409 on: January 09, 2019, 01:27:04 PM »

Good idea, Havard. Glad I thought of it! -- Russ
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #410 on: January 09, 2019, 01:54:26 PM »

Frithjof,

it is only presumption; I'm no building engineer: To me it rather looks like the tube served to drain the area behind the brick wall. On the one hand the angle doesn't look that steep at the picture and on the other hand draining that area in front of the wall would have meant to shape the surface toward the inlet of the tube. I'd rather expect a maybe somewhat inclined surface draining water towards the front, especially according to the amount of water on such a small surface?

About the UV adhesive: how does it harden - there's only that tiny seam between tube and block?

Cheers,
Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
fspg2
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« Reply #411 on: January 10, 2019, 10:32:01 AM »


@Hauk @Russ
Sorry, at the moment I cann´t serve with a current overview photo, because most of my small individual projects are packed in various boxes.
To get a small impression, I can only refer to thread No.16 currently: click: 08.09.2015

@Volker
Unfortunately, when I started this project in 2007, I couldn't look at the bridgehead anymore because it has already been demolished a year before.

But I could talk to an architect who told me that this thin pipe was used to drain the water from the sandstone plinth.
In addition, there was a depression between the two supports of the bridge, in which the water could collect and flow from there into the small drainage pipe.

Quote
On the one hand the angle doesn't look that steep at the picture
You are right Huh

Meanwhile, I have created a recess with a small grinding wheel.
As it really looked, I can only guess. Unfortunately, there is no photo of it.

Modul-Montage_36 (fspg2)



Quote
About the UV adhesive: how does it harden - there's only that tiny seam between tube and block?

I got to know this UV-glue through a modelmaker.
After the glue is applied, the small tube was still movable for a few secunds. Only when the small supplied UV lamp is activated for 5-15 seconds, the splice hardens. Without UV light, it takes about 15 minutes to harden.
It can be used very well for the assembly of model glass (glass or plastic). If the UV light is used, the glue will not effloresce. You just have to be very sparing with the amount of glue. It is best to wear it with a small needle or thin metal rod.
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Frithjof
Lawton Maner
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« Reply #412 on: January 10, 2019, 11:46:47 AM »

The adhesive uses the same technique that your dentist uses to build up a filling now that many people feel the amalgam of silver and mercury is dangerous.  Unlike the amalgam, this can be built up on a surface rather then having to be dovetailed into the tooth in order to hold it in place.  This adhesive is often advertised on late night television. 
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finescalerr
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« Reply #413 on: January 10, 2019, 02:25:21 PM »

This post is pretty boring in comparison with the interesting stuff above ... but thanks for the link to your drawing. Now I can see how everything will fit together. I really like your diorama. -- Russ
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fspg2
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« Reply #414 on: January 14, 2019, 03:01:47 AM »

As the title of this thread suggests, at some point a ship must appear.

At the stairs a small metal boat swims, as it was used next to many river Elbe ships..

I imagine a small dinghy, as you can see here on a historic photo of the Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau (Federal Institute of Hydraulic Engineering).

After all, I want to give back the red Lego ship to my grandson.

Modul-Montage_37 (fspg2)



However, I miss the dimensions and more detailed photos currently.



Some time ago I received from a modeler colleague some great drawings of old port barges, in some cases even with all longitudinal, lateral and lateral cracks.

I will try to build a barge (Spitzschute) from the year 1926 as exactly as possible. For that I have already scaled the three line chracks to 1: 22.5 and assigned the three levels to each other.

Spitzschute_1926_01 (fspg2)



Since this about 55cm long unpowered barge should never swim in real water, I'm still undecided in the choice of materials.


If you are looking for plans of such barges, you can find old blueprints and drawings at digipeer.


There are pictures of old barges, for example here, here and also here.


To construct ship hulls, you can use Freeship or maybe also Delftship.
I have not tried it yet, but only read it in a ship's model building forum so far.

Finally, for today a beautiful film from the 1950s on a coal transport with barges in Hamburg.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2019, 03:53:44 AM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
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« Reply #415 on: January 14, 2019, 02:10:39 PM »

I will miss the red Lego boat when you return it. Still, I look forward to seeing how you build the dinghy. -- Russ
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fspg2
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« Reply #416 on: Today at 02:47:06 AM »

I wrote:
Quote
However, I miss the dimensions and more detailed photos currently.

If you know the right name, then something comes to light!
I didn´t have the desired success with "dinghy" or "rescue boat" before.
Helmut gave me the hint with which word I had to search.
So I checked for "Schottel-Nachen" and found several pictures of the boat I´m looking for.

For example:  here, here, here or here.



For the two bridgeheads, the "sandstone curbs" at the bottom were provided with a 5.0mm wide groove,

Modul-Montage_38 (fspg2)


mounted on MDF boards and glued with superglue.

Modul-Montage_39 (fspg2)



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Now these pre-assembled parts have to be painted before they are glued to the bridgeheads finally.

Modul-Montage_41 (fspg2)
« Last Edit: Today at 02:55:16 AM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
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« Reply #417 on: Today at 02:57:01 PM »

I think the generic name for the boat you want to model is simply "rowboat".

The English word for "rescue boat" is "lifeboat" and most tend to be larger and even shaped differently than the boats in your links.

That is your vocabulary lesson for today. Now let's get back to modeling.

Russ
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Design-HSB
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« Reply #418 on: Today at 05:57:08 PM »

Russ,

these boats were work boats and always in the water. On inland waterways it is usually not far on land and there are also rescue equipment only according to A4, which includes this ship. Much more important, however, was that maintenance work could be carried out from outside on the ship with this ship, or cables could be brought ashore to moor. The German name for such ships is "Nachen or Schaluppe."
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Regards Helmut
the journey is the goal
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