Westlake Publishing Forums
August 22, 2019, 12:52:03 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 ... 17 18 19 [20] 21 22 23 ... 31
  Print  
Author Topic: Feldbahnmodule with ship  (Read 172159 times)
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 870



WWW
« Reply #285 on: September 08, 2016, 01:17:08 AM »


Brass MS58 can be milled better, but I have used MS63. Most dealers sells MS58plates from 0.5mm thickness only. MS63 is more soft and can be bent better. I milled with addition of cutting oil.

May I ask where you buy your brass? And do you have a good source for milling bits?
And again, thanks for the inspiration & information.

By the way, did you consider etching the 0,4mm? With half-etched folding lines the 0,4mm brass folds up nicely. I have etched 0,5mm parts with good results.
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 272



« Reply #286 on: September 17, 2016, 11:24:09 AM »

@Hauk

Sorry for my late reply, I was on a business trip.

May I ask where you buy your brass?

My address for brass and nickel silver is: http://www.wilmsmetall.de

For modeler they have a special edition (mostly dimensions: 200mm x 300mm): http://www.wilmsmetall.de/static/download/Extrablatt_Modellbauer.pdf. The price is sometimes a little bit cheaper.

If you needs more different material thickness have a look here: http://www.zaenker-dittrich.de/messing-bleche.php.  I got this link from a colleague at Buntbahn forum shortly.

And do you have a good source for milling bits?

A lot of milling bits I'm ordering on this adress: http://www.as-toolstore.de. The quality ist quite enough for most requirements.

With milling bits from Hoffmann Group (more expensive) you can get a longer lifetime. I'm often using:  https://www.hoffmann-group.com/DE/de/hom/Monozerspanung/VHM-Fräser/VHM-Mini-Fräser-TiAlN/p/201842-0,5
 On the right side you can choose the size (Größe wählen).

The length of the 0.5mm cutter is only 2,3mm (instead 5mm to 7,5mm from as-toolestore). More than 30 hours I'm using the milling bits from type number: 201842 - without lost of their sharpness. My feed rate for example with a 0.5mm cutter is: 100-120mm/min  -  20000-26000 rpm  -  milling depth is half of the cutter diameter maximum.


And again, thanks for the inspiration & information.

Thanks, I hope you'll follow my thread in future as well. Smiley


By the way, did you consider etching the 0,4mm? With half-etched folding lines the 0,4mm brass folds up nicely. I have etched 0,5mm parts with good results.

Yes, I did!   I know etching helps a lot to save time Wink  But I don't like the edges. A L-profile or U-profile have sharp edges. An etched profile will get a radius.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 03:38:12 PM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 870



WWW
« Reply #287 on: September 17, 2016, 03:07:36 PM »

@Hauk

Sorry for my late reply, I was on a business trip.



No problem!
Thanks a lot for the links, a lot of very useful stuff!
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 272



« Reply #288 on: October 03, 2016, 01:49:28 PM »

For the 4 crossbeams I need U-profiles with dimensions of 13.5mm x 4.0mm x 200mm.
The relevant dealers sells either 12mm x 4.0mm or 15mm x 4.0mm.

Although I would have milled the U-profiles of a 4.0 mm flat profile, then the inner surfaces of the lateral flanks would not have become slightly conical, but only parallel.
A manufacturer could fabricate the profiles - in desired dimensions, however the setting costs for the machine are considerably – much more than the profiles themselves.

So I ordered four 15mm profiles with 250mm length.

In an MDF board I milled a groove (250mm long and 15.0mm wide).
The four profiles were laid into the recess. On each end 2 holes (3mm) were drilled. Small screws holds the profiles determined, while an 1.5mm router separats the parts in the middle.

Quertraeger_trennen_01 (fspg2)



The result are a 4x2 curved L-profiles (the braching was out).


Quertraeger_trennen_02 (fspg2)



Two half profiles shall soldered together – so I´ll get a height of 13.5 mm.

In addition I have milled small "shoes" of brass. That will keep the two halves in position when soldering.

Quertraeger_trennen_03 (fspg2)



Quertraeger_trennen_04 (fspg2)



Quertraeger_trennen_05 (fspg2)



Soon I will solder – hard or soft... I will test it.

 
At the tower beams I drawed a little bit further.

Profile by profile are drawn as single files. So its easier to position the holes for rivets or the center marks.

Traeger_Montage_36 (fspg2)



Traeger_Montage_39 (fspg2)

Logged

Frithjof
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5419


« Reply #289 on: October 03, 2016, 04:07:48 PM »

I've never seen anyone do that with brass. Incredible. -- Russ
Logged
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3987



WWW
« Reply #290 on: October 03, 2016, 10:57:09 PM »

I never cease to be amazed at how much effort you put into making this, and making sure it's exactly right!
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #291 on: October 04, 2016, 05:59:43 AM »

I look forward to seeing the soldering - before you clean it up!
Torch or iron?
-Mj
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 870



WWW
« Reply #292 on: October 04, 2016, 07:39:36 AM »

For the 4 crossbeams I need U-profiles with dimensions of 13.5mm x 4.0mm x 200mm.
The relevant dealers sells either 12mm x 4.0mm or 15mm x 4.0mm.

Crazy stuff. In a good way, of course.
A great inspiration to get some milling done myself.
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 272



« Reply #293 on: October 12, 2016, 11:46:54 PM »

Thanks a lot  Smiley

Present I am drawing the head of bridge support:


Oberhaupt_05 (fspg2)



Oberhaupt_06 (fspg2)


The four weights that push down the bridge were raised and lowered by a winch.
The winch has four separate areas on its pulley for the ropes of the four weights.


Winde_01 (fspg2)

Copyright: WSA-Lauenburg/Elbe


Winde_02 (fspg2)

Copyright: WSA-Lauenburg/Elbe


Winde_03 (fspg2)

Copyright: WSA-Lauenburg/Elbe


On the drawings I can see three pulleys (on the left side) leading the ropes down to the winch only. I´m missing the fourth pulley.


Oberhaupt_04 (fspg2)

Copyright: WSA-Lauenburg/Elbe


The horizontal pulley (right side) I haven´t drawn yet!

Copyright: Lauenburger Elbschiffahrtsarchiv (fspg2)

Feldbahn-Hubbrücke - Mittelteil
Logged

Frithjof
1-32
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 716


Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #294 on: October 13, 2016, 02:45:14 AM »

love the color renderings.
cheers
Logged
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3987



WWW
« Reply #295 on: October 14, 2016, 12:12:12 AM »

Cool!
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 272



« Reply #296 on: October 21, 2016, 07:09:05 AM »

A small supplement to the functional sequence:

By default the bridge was lowered permanently.
At normal water level a minimum overhead clearance of 4.5m were given.
Also the light railway could pass the bridge and it had´nt take the other into consideration.
The floats are not floated on, and thus did not raise the bridge also because there was not water inside the two shafts at that time. The bridge rested by their weight and via the attached connecting float supports on the two carriers safely.
.

Only at a higher water level (f.e. snow melt floot) water streamed into the two shafts and lifted the bridge up to about 2.0m (circa 89mm in the model).

All moving vessels had always priority in traffic on the Elbe-Trave-Canal (later Elbe-Lübeck-Canal)!

Wanted a light railway to pass the obstacle and the ship traffic allowed it a worker lowered the four weights with a hand crank.
The buoyancy of the floats was calculated that the relatively low weight of four weights (each 500Kg) sufficient to press down the bridge, no matter how high the water level was in the shafts.
Also gate valves were closed so no additional water could flow into the shaft. Overflowing water was drained away through pipes.

Later the weights were uplifted by a worker again. The bridge was lifted by the residual water in the shafts and water comming from the canal after opening the gate valves.


As driving I will take an underfloor engine. The four ropes comming from the motor drive will be wounded over the pulley of the winch triple-fold.

Depending on direction of rotation the lifting or lowering of weights will take place. They weigh about 60 grams each. Whether that is enough for a smooth operation I´ll check on a test rack.


Antrieb-Seilwinde_01 (fspg2)

schematic diagram

Antrieb-Seilwinde_02 (fspg2)

schematic diagram


At the same time the hand crank shall move.
The pulley has a diameter of 10mm -  almost three rope revolutions would wound onto the roll (89mm way).
At a model gear ratio of 1/8 * 1/5 = 1/40  I would have to crank 120 times until the weights are raised or lowered.
So the motor drive has really turn slowly or I would have to crank by hand!
Lifting or lowering the original bridge itself took about 10 minutes.

The model drive is already working. I can make a choise between 24 seconds - 8.5 minutes. See here und as video.



Meanwhile I have drawn to the winch a little bit -  in time two gears are missing only.


Winde-18 (fspg2)



Winde-19 (fspg2)



Winde-20 (fspg2)



Zahnrad_43mm_136Z (fspg2)



Zahnrad_43mm_136Z-02 (fspg2)



I´ll continue the construction if I know the real diameter of the individual gears I can buy.


Now I need an idea where I can get gears with module 0.3 or 0.4.
The upper table contains the converted dimensions of the original gears and the bottom I found at a dealer I trus.

Zahnrad_Tabelle (fspg2)


I would like to use purchased parts (brass) and rework this a bit.

So far I have found diameter of 36mm with 120 teeth (module 0, 3) – in Germany.

Does anyone have experience with printed gears?

Which materials are helpfull?

Are there any problems with the surface roughness?
Logged

Frithjof
1-32
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 716


Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #297 on: October 22, 2016, 03:37:40 PM »

hi Frithjof.
your modelling is so different to my efforts but i still like it.
you are basically a model engineer but differ from the lath art of the past.yourself  Volker and Helmut are mastering software to produce your rivet perfect models.
cheers kim
Logged
fspg2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 272



« Reply #298 on: October 23, 2016, 12:17:54 PM »

Hi Kim,

Thank you very much for your praise :-)

Today I soldered together the half profiles for the crossbeams.

Although I originally wanted to braze the parts, the first carrier was soldered soft. Until now it keeps together.


Quertraeger_trennen_06 (fspg2)



The surfaces were trimed with sandpaper first and afterwards with the sandblaster.

Quertraeger_trennen_06-Ausschnitt (fspg2)


The still visible joint I will fill in with solder. Next four 3x3mm L-profiles will "riveted" to the beam. That would have sufficient stability to give.


Quertraeger_trennen_07 (fspg2)




Also the remaining gears for the winch were drawn.

An animation shows the function already.


Winde_Animation_01 (fspg2)




I'm still not quite sure how the four weights were built in the original.


Gewichte_05 (fspg2)



I suspect that they consisted of three parts.

How they were connected to each other? In the middle area there was a continuous rod certainly... but how can I imagine the red dotted connections?


Gewichte_06 (fspg2)



Gewichte_01 (fspg2)



Gewichte_04 (fspg2)

Logged

Frithjof
EZnKY
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 364



« Reply #299 on: October 23, 2016, 08:23:56 PM »

Wouldn't the central vertical rod be enough to "connect" them together?  (Along with gravity of course!) 

What if the short vertical lines you've circled in red are just concealed alignment pins to keep the three sections from rotating around the vertical rod? 
Logged

Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
Pages: 1 ... 17 18 19 [20] 21 22 23 ... 31
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!