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Author Topic: Feldbahnmodule with ship  (Read 200835 times)
Malachi Constant
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« Reply #135 on: October 14, 2012, 08:41:25 PM »



Almost everything in this thread complete blows my mind (mein kopf explodiert) ... all sorts of brilliant use of high tech equipment and techniques to produce fabulous models ...

Only in this photo do I see something that I can truly understand ... the use of scotch tape to produce a Rube Goldberg fixture.  It's very encouraging to see a modeling genius do at least one thing like (some of) the rest of us!  Grin

Outstanding modeling!  -- Dallas
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artizen
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« Reply #136 on: October 14, 2012, 09:50:12 PM »

I use Lego to achieve the same result. This looks slightly more high-tech to me!
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
fspg2
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« Reply #137 on: October 25, 2012, 06:39:16 PM »

@Dallas
We all are cooking only with water Wink

With a 6.0mm ball cutter I will mill soon the shape of the elbow (right and wrong), each 3.0mm deep into two Teflon plates.


Heber_12 (fspg2)



These two half-shells will be fixed with four pins in the correct position, so that I get a mold.


Heber_13 (fspg2)



Teflon spray will be used as release agent. Thereafter, liquid resin will be filled in the mold. After curing I will separate the sprues (shown in yellow) and stick the flanges ....

Kruemmer_Flansch (fspg2)


I am curious if it will work  :?:



If it doesnt go, as I wants here might be a good alternative.

Krümmer_11 (fspg2)






The light railway lift bridge was originally stored on two floats. They were lifted in shafts depending on water levels. At high tide (for example snowmelt) the bridge was pushed up to get a consisted overhead clearance of 4.50 m for the ships.


Schwimmer_01 (fspg2)



Through a hole in the module wall we´ll watch it later.


Schwimmer_02 (fspg2)



The cover for the float are made of brass.


Schwimmer_03 (fspg2)



The stones of the shaft were milled in a 1.0 mm thick plywood plate 0.5 mm deep. The invisible area received only vertical joints at a distance of 4.74 mm, so that the plate can be bent better. With a inner diameter of 111.0 mm of the Plexiglas tube that measure is not enough. The plate will be bent more under hot water steam.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_01 (fspg2)



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Frithjof
marc_reusser
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« Reply #138 on: October 29, 2012, 06:09:23 PM »

Sigh,.....and you continue to be just as crazy as ever. Grin Grin Grin

As always, beautiful,fascinating, and educational.

Marc
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fspg2
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« Reply #139 on: November 03, 2012, 07:30:05 AM »

Marc, thanks a lot for the compliment!

For the revision platform I have milled an auxiliary frame, attached to the outside of the Plexiglas tube. It will bear the wall elements later.


Schwimmer_04 (fspg2)



Schwimmer_05 (fspg2)



Schwimmer_06 (fspg2)



When I opened the dishwasher this morning, a lot of steam came towards me.... and at the same time a thought hit me.

I put the milled 1.0 mm plywood-wall unceremoniously into the machine and I waited about 20 minutes, what would happen.

The wood had sprung through the hot steam, but to the wrong direction - so that the stones were now outside.

However, I could bent the plywood quite easily to the opposite direction and introduced it into the plexiglass tube. Another tube, a few strips of wood and two clamps pressed the plate in the correct rounding.

Then I put everything in the oven. A bowl of boiling water was added as a moisturizer to it. At 75 degrees Celsius I let it in the oven for 20 minutes again.

The Plexiglas tube GS withstand heat up to 80 degrees Celsius.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_02 (fspg2)




Currently I let everything cool down slowly. Tomorrow I´ll know the result.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_03 (fspg2)



Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_04 (fspg2)


« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 07:34:03 AM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #140 on: November 03, 2012, 08:22:33 AM »

The light railway lift bridge was originally stored on two floats. They were lifted in shafts depending on water levels. At high tide (for example snowmelt) the bridge was pushed up to get a consisted overhead clearance of 4.50 m for the ships.

If the position of the railway bridge is variable by height, how did they handle the approach to the bridge? Did it have some kind of adjustable ramp at each end?

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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #141 on: November 03, 2012, 10:46:32 AM »

It looks like a strange science experiment!  Grin  -- Dallas
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finescalerr
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« Reply #142 on: November 04, 2012, 01:54:32 AM »

I think this man is amazing. Let's see what the Mad Scientist has created. -- Russ
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fspg2
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« Reply #143 on: November 05, 2012, 04:05:34 PM »

Quote
If the position of the railway bridge is variable by height, how did they handle the approach to the bridge? Did it have some kind of adjustable ramp at each end?

There was no ramp necessary such as: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZrhuSE_ivA&feature=youtube_gdata_player   Grin

Both the sluice and the lift bridge were operated without electricity or diesel power.

It works very easily: only water power and two winches were used.


1: normal position - the float container are at the bottom - the light railway can use the bridge




2: lifted position - at high flood (in winter at snow melt) - the bridge can not be driven




3: lower position - With 4 weights (marked in red) - two with one winch per column - were lowered onto the bridge. The bridge is lowered despite high tide. The train can go. Then the weights are cranked up again. The bridge is lifted once more by the buoyancy of the floating container. (like position 2)


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Frithjof
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #144 on: November 05, 2012, 07:28:00 PM »

Ah, I see. Thanks.
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fspg2
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« Reply #145 on: November 11, 2012, 05:38:05 AM »

A more exact addition:

Had a field train pass over the bridge, shotts and slides were put so that the water would flow out of the shafts. 4 weights expressed simultaneously (two per side / red) the bridge on its abutments and held her down, no matter what the water level was. In case of lockage, it proceeded in reverse order. Weights were cranked up (there were no electric drives - only water, compressed air and hand cranks), shotts and slide set and the water flows back into the shafts and lifted the bridge again. Such a process takes about 10 minutes. (Maybe electroseparators pumps had mastered the whole thing in about 2 minutes).  
This bridge served a match factory and a brick factory. In 1926, both companies had agreed to give up their trucks. They had a fear that the "heavy transport" (wood, bricks, tiles, and coal) would destroy the local roads. Thus, the bridge over the Elbe-Lübeck Canal (which was originally Elbe-Trave Canal in 1900)) was an important connexion between the main railway and the two companies. It works there about 500 workman and employees.  

The bridge was calculated originally for a load of 1 horse with 3 wagon (with about 7.8 tons) in 1901, but in everyday life the bridge soon became a locomotive and several wagons and a significantly higher weight (27 tons) was loaded. (See the two original attachments, only in German).  

About 90 freight cars from the main railway were loaded in goods (stone and brick) in 1949 by the brick factory and unloaded about 112 wagons with coal and machine parts. Together with the match factory there were even some 250 wagons with coal, which were transferred in 1950 to the light railway.




found: http://buchhorsterwaldbahn.de/stuff/Interaktiver_Streckenplan/Buchhorster_Ziegeleibahn/Entdecke_die_alte_Trasse/Umschaufeln.html

To this image I have a special affinity, it shows right in the picture my father in the 1950ger years.
War related material shortages also showed traces to the bridge.  The rusted and broken parts couldn´t repaired. The mechanical overload eventually led to a closure of the bridge in 1950.
After long negotiations with the city and the country, it was agreed to replace the old bridge with a new structure. The two companies had to bear he costs. Cheap credits were been provided by the public authorities.
As a further industrial development was desired, new users should contribute to the new bridge with a levy. However, this didn´t happened really. The new bridge was demolished in 1965 again - the truck was faster, cheaper, ...




The polymethyl methacrylate tube - Abbreviation PMMA (better known as acrylic glass or PLEXIGLAS ® (registered trademark of Röhm GmbH) - can be worked very well with a saw and cutter.
The plywood wall I used as a help to mark the cutting edge from the outside with a red felt pen. After that the plywood was removed and the tube attached to a drill stand.
With a sharp cutter the router separated the edges along the markings.


The Plexiglas GS can be worked wonderfully. However, it should be a vacuum cleaner nearby.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_07 (fspg2)



The cross sections were made on the Böhler saw. Like here:




The plexiglass tube only acts as a support for the outer circular wall sections. Because the interior is visible, the upper sector has been processed  accordingly.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_08 (fspg2)



Into the vertical grooves of the tube a machined brass profile will be glued (at the picture it´s still loosely inserted).


Schacht_Fuehrungsschiene_02 (fspg2)



It serves as a guide rail for the rollers of the float.


Schacht_Fuehrungsschiene_01 (fspg2)






* Hubbruecke_Archiv_0-4.jpg (218.86 KB, 848x1200 - viewed 1640 times.)

* Hubbruecke_Archiv_0-5.jpg (138.17 KB, 848x1200 - viewed 1679 times.)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2012, 07:44:47 AM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
marc_reusser
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« Reply #146 on: November 13, 2012, 04:41:22 PM »

Wow. Your research, understanding and interpolation of the the construction and mechanics of the bridge are fascinating, and the history, photos, and documentation you provide is wonderful. The understanding of all this by us/me the reader, really allows for a much greater fascination, understanding , involvement and enjoyment of all the hard work and thought that you are putting into this build. Thank you.
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M-Works
fspg2
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« Reply #147 on: November 24, 2012, 01:04:59 PM »

Hi Marc,

Thank you for your kind words!

It's fun, not only to pursue modeling, but also to revive a bit of the history of my home again!


A stronger "corset" was drawn for the shaft in the meantime...


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_09 (fspg2)



Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_10 (fspg2)



... and milled ...


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_12 (fspg2)



... and installed only as a trial.


Schacht_Mauerabwicklung_11 (fspg2)

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Frithjof
fspg2
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« Reply #148 on: February 20, 2013, 01:56:42 PM »

At the two following sketches of the float you can see two different versions:

Schwimmer_07(fspg2)



Schwimmer_08 (fspg2)



Which version of the float was built in 1900 I could not find out really. At least the tower of the following drawing is never documented on any photo. However, good to see here is the jack. With this winch counterweights were dropped down to the bridge if a light railway should pass across at high flood.

Hubbruecke_Winde_01(fspg2)


In the previous simulation of the shaft I came out of two embedded U-profiles for the lead roles in the masonry. Meanwhile I milled a new plexiglass tube with slots for four profiles. So I will get a safer guide.

Plexiglass_schlitzen_01(fspg2)


With the help of a drawing and a rectangular plexiglass piece (instead of a geo-triangle) the four markers were transferred to the plexiglass tube.

Plexiglass_schlitzen_02(fspg2)


Along these lines the four new slots were milled.

Plexiglass_schlitzen_03(fspg2)



Plexiglass_schlitzen_05(fspg2)



Schwimmer_09(fspg2)



A colleague turned the domed lids of the float from brass.


Schwimmer_10(fspg2)


Schwimmer_11(fspg2)


The float inside has four supports and two rings of brass.


Schwimmer_14(fspg2)


I milled four small holes into the underside for a safe connection. A MDF-plate works as a milling gauge.

Schwimmer_12(fspg2)



Schwimmer_13(fspg2)



Schwimmer_15(fspg2)


... Resistance soldering is really great, I would not miss it anymore :-)

Schwimmer_16(fspg2)



Schwimmer_17(fspg2)



Until now I had assumed that the entire lid were made of riveted "pie segments." Discovered on the network prototype photos and drawings from the ship canal lift Henrichenburg I had found such a construction. Here, however, the float had a diameter of 8.3 m.
I wanted to raise the brass rivets with a jig on the domed lid and .... ...now Volker helped with his reflections. He has kindly provided the cover for a tank car.

So the turned brass lid was pressed again into the MDF plate and I drilled four holes of 2mm. A round brass piece of 52mm x 10mm was equipped with congruent holes. Using four 2mm brass wire pieces both parts have been assembled.
Solder, soldering fluid.... and the resistance soldering device were allowed to show what it can do: I was very curious to see if the flame is not in as much material might be faster / better the parts added together.


Schwimmer_18(fspg2)


There are two small videos here and here. The flame has lost.
 
Then the lid was clamped on a lathe and the edge was rounded.


Schwimmer_19(fspg2)



In order to receive an even riveting image the 0.3mm nickel silver plates were punche-marked with a V-Cutter 0.13 mm deep. A Pertinax pattern served again as a stop for the exact positioning of the plates.

Schwimmer_20(fspg2)


In the next step the four panels were bent with the roller bending machine. Two victim plates served to get no kinks at the ends - as described here.

Schwimmer_21(fspg2)


The curved panels were conducted at the rip fence of the rivets embossing machine along and the rivets were pressed with 1.3 mm head diameter.


Schwimmer_22 (fspg2)


Schwimmer_23(fspg2)


Because of the comment of a fellow at Buntbahn forum I have bought a suction device - the quiet fan draws the vapors through the charcoal filter and provides for a better feel and probably for better air. In any case the bad smells are minimized.

Schwimmer_24(fspg2)


Schwimmer_25 (fspg2)

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Frithjof
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« Reply #149 on: February 20, 2013, 02:49:04 PM »

Satisfactory. -- Russ
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