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Author Topic: Scatchbuilding machinery  (Read 35047 times)
78ths
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Build in 7/8ths Scale (1:13.7)


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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2011, 10:18:59 AM »

Came across this site today and it has some really nice high res photos of a machine shop

http://stevebriggs.netfirms.com/osmrm/russelhistory.html

cheers Ferd
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Ferd Mels  Ontario Canada    eh!
SE Scale - all other scales pale by comparison.  7/8"=1'-0"
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Chris
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« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2011, 12:00:13 PM »

When it comes to scratchbuilding machines we should not forget Christophe LeCorre. He does some remarkable work. I am not sure if he is a member of this forum, but he would be a great fit for sure.

Here is a link to a french forum with some of his work:
http://teamtrack.xooit.com/t135-MACHINE.htm

No need to understand French; the pictures speak for themselves.

Some amazing work there. Reminds me of the days when many manufacturers of 1:1 work also had a very skilled model builder. In the US even the Wilamette factory made like 1:20 models of Donkeys etc. Thanks for posting.

Anders Grin

Thanks Grin BKLN sorry I don't know your firstname !
There is to much things to say about machines and scratchbuilding
in the link you have mentioned you can find good pictures about naval shipyard in England using lathes milling machines planners etc...
Let me share that model with you here, this a gaz compressors factory for a coking plant I made
It's all scratch using metal parts, PVC, styrene, brass and every materials I can found






More to come... Wink
 
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Philip Smith
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« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2011, 06:00:16 PM »

Wonderful Chris! WOW!

philip
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pwranta193
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« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2011, 07:48:00 PM »

Anders - Portland would be the part of the valley I live in... I need to do more looking into the old mill stuff here.  We were also famous for Shanghaiing folks out of Portland during that same era... loggers, farmers, workers, etc., guys would hit the bars and wake up working on a ship bound for the Orient  Grin

BLKN - and Christophe, I've used up about 3-4 hours this weekend going through Christophe's work and that British Lathe/Tool reference site... and I'm pretty much stunned. My daughter's school project took a day and half this weekend, so I didn't get anything worth taking a photo done.  I hope to get a little work done this eve on a large vertical milling machine in 1:35th, inspired by the one in your factory project.  I'm working doing a 1930s era version (I'm assuming they had them then), along the lines of yours, but perhaps with a touch more of a "rough cast look" to the base and the armature.  I did manage to find some snippets of Soviet wartime production from propaganda films in middle of the night (fighting a cold) so that I can have some other tool designs to work from   Smiley

I've got about 25 questions about your work - but will start small here  Grin
First - in looking at the powerhouse - did you build your first set from scratch and then cast the next four, or did you make all six units from scratch???

Second - as my French speaking daughter is away this weekend - what is the master plan for the large tool and shop room (the one with the multiple production lines)?

Stunning stuff all around, sir - really inspiring... and thanks to everyone that has jumped in here...
Paul
 
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Paul

"Did I mention this is a bad idea?"
Chris
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« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2011, 01:06:43 AM »

In fact it's only 4 units but all scratchbuilt
My Paradise


Recycling...





Transforming...


Result...


It's funny but that's like I proceed, you can't imagine our society through in this kind of area  Roll Eyes
For the rest it's only observation with pictures & documentations you can find on web, c
Casting for 4 machines take me too much time so I made 8 or 16 pieces of each and then you assemble them !
With the first coat of paint  you give life to your model

The second question is a bit difficult it's depend of "what are you producing in ?" generaly you have several buildings : power house , foundry, casting shop, milling area, electrical, assembling etc...
So is it for tiny parts likes bolt gears etc... or it's the final assembling line for tractors
The buildings in this case are huge with a metal structure Overhead crane etc
Here's a link on my thread http://teamtrack.xooit.com/t135-MACHINE.htm?start=75 where you can find pictures of a naval ship yard
Another interesting link: Mesta machine works near Pittsburg, Mesta was a company who made machine for mills & other heavy industries, nices pictures of vertical lathe etc... http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/mesta.html
In my opinion it's difficult to build all of this Undecided (too much parts too much time etc...money Grin)
But making a part with an open side, 3 feet long 4 feet long is possible along your backdrop for exemple with two line of production inside
racks for parts on the back, machine on first plan, overhead crane on top, you can have different possibilities
Hope I was clear Wink
 
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Junior
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Anders "Junior"


« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2011, 02:14:47 AM »

That´s a fantastic model and what a collection of parts Shocked! Could you please describe how you painted the rusted parts, smoke stack etc.

Anders Grin
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Chris
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« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2011, 04:42:37 AM »

So first I used Humbrol matt 186 mix black 33 sprayed with an airbrush
after it's a combination of oil artist burned sienna and some chalk from different colors oxyde dark oxyde etc...
you obtain a rusty texture. I used different kind of brush also a tooth brush to sprayed artistic oil recovered with chalks Smiley
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BKLN
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« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2011, 01:22:01 PM »

Christophe,
I am very excited to see that you are indeed a member here. Your work is absolutely amazing. I find myself going back to "Team Track"at least once a week and every time I discover some new nice details in your work.

Christian
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Marc988
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« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2011, 07:39:19 AM »


Great work and really inspiring.

Could you maybe send some information on how you did the brickwork on the brick buildings ?

Regards,
Marc
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chester
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« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2011, 08:33:55 AM »

Chris, excellent build both in the construction and finishes. I particularly like the traveling gantry crane (what can be seen of it in the photos) Thanks very much for sharing.
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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2011, 10:39:54 AM »

I would like to know about the bricks too...bricks are one of my pet peeves in models and these are superb to my eye!(as is everything else!)

Paul
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Paul
Chris
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« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2011, 11:36:23 AM »

Thanks  Cheesy

For Chester Wink

[/url]

For the brick I'm not sure but it's a guy in Germany who made that, Lockfüehrer lukas, in fact one of my connection bring me "panels" in resin of this factory
and Ask me to made something, with ARA productions in Vichy we made windows, doors and all the rest have been scratchbuilt in brass and styrene
I think for each panels, have been drawn on computer and he made a master then produce a mold for casting Huh

This module will be added to the coking plant I should connect pipe to the oven's one

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finescalerr
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« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2011, 03:06:18 AM »

Not bad. -- Russ
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2011, 06:17:40 AM »

You should put some crappy, shiny plastic figures in the photo ... so we can actually tell that we're looking at a model!  Grin

(Really outstanding)

Cheers,
Dallas
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Chris
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« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2011, 11:27:19 AM »

Yes I think it's not bad for a model that weighs 80 kg/160 pounds;D

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