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Author Topic: Ale-8-One Reefer  (Read 49819 times)
pwranta193
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« Reply #105 on: August 22, 2011, 06:42:27 PM »

My lawn should look so good... great depth with the multi color effort.
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Paul

"Did I mention this is a bad idea?"
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« Reply #106 on: August 24, 2011, 10:51:58 AM »

Eric, this is all so nice. The soil is very effective as is the track. The static grass will need color and texture blending, maybe skip the painting as that may bilk up the fibers.

Do you have a source for the home-made static applicator?

Thanks, John
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John Palecki
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« Reply #107 on: August 24, 2011, 06:13:15 PM »

Thanks John.  I agree more blending is required. 
The applicator couldn't be easier to make.  I bought an electric flyswatter from Harbor Freight for a couple of bucks.  Took off the swatter part, soldered one of the wire leads to a long wire with an alligator clip on the end, and soldered the other lead to a kitchen strainer.  I epoxied the strainer to the handle in place of the swatter part.  This wasn't my idea - I found instructions all over the internet, with varying levels of complexity.  I'm not convinced it works as well as the purchased units, but I'm satisfied with the results.  Total cost was about $15.  I can tell you it hurts like h*ll if you complete the circuit.


* Shelf 19.jpg (58.78 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 878 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
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« Reply #108 on: August 24, 2011, 10:34:38 PM »

That's interesting about the hurt bit. I have an electronic fly swat sitting here waiting for the chop but I demonstrated it to my wife who had heard all about these dangerous pseudo-tasers (the reason they are banned in Australia) by jabbing a piece of steel florist wire through the mesh to make the big sparkie thing with a blue flame. Lots of noise but no physical reaction so I can only conclude that my fly swat produces 7/8ths of nothing in the way of electrickery!
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
nk
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« Reply #109 on: August 25, 2011, 06:19:15 AM »

Eric, this is a pleasure to watch develop. The grass looks right to me with enough patchiness and variation to not need anything more. Thanks for posting the step by step.

Ian you mentioned "electrickery"...you must have watched Catweazle in the early 70s.
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You may ask yourself: "Well, how did I get here?"

http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/
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« Reply #110 on: August 25, 2011, 07:20:54 PM »

Can't remember Catweazle. Do remember The Young Ones, the Bananaramas, The Monkeys, The Goodies, Monty Python, Not Only But Also, Porridge and Spike Milligan. Now I get my humour from The IT Crowd and Big Bang Theory which both appeal to my warped sense of realism!
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
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« Reply #111 on: September 03, 2011, 06:12:38 PM »

I've been working on some weeds and such for the shelf module, and I'm not happy with the results so far.
I could use some feedback.

I think the Queen Anne's Lace turned out okay, but not the long grass.  (I'm trying for something like foxtail grass, if that means anything.)

I see two issues.  The first is a lack of density to the plants.  The second is the ability to see to the ground through the weeds, which is related to the first problem.  I've thought about adding a darker green "understory" to the ground plane before "planting" the weeds.  Do you think this would help?

Or do I just need to keep planting weeds?



* Shelf 21.jpg (120.29 KB, 900x1200 - viewed 764 times.)

* Shelf 20.jpg (149.98 KB, 900x1200 - viewed 786 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
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« Reply #112 on: September 03, 2011, 06:14:29 PM »

Here's a shot of a fairly typical right-of-way in central Kentucky...


* Shelf 22.jpg (194.42 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 779 times.)

* Shelf 23.jpg (170.29 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 833 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
finescalerr
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« Reply #113 on: September 04, 2011, 02:38:26 AM »

It would seem you only need to add a few more weeds. Someone with a sharper eye may prove me wrong, though. -- Russ
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« Reply #114 on: September 04, 2011, 03:31:33 PM »

More weeds and more variety in both species and heights would work splendiferously. Could always try a bit more dark texture grass in between as well if you want to go to that level of effort.
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Ian Hodgkiss
The Steamy Pudding - an English Gentleman's Whimsy in 1:24 scale Gn15 (in progress)
On the Slate and Narrow - in 1:12 scale (coming soon)
Brisbane, Australia
EZnKY
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« Reply #115 on: September 05, 2011, 04:08:21 PM »

Well the consensus seems to be "more weed"!
So to speak.

While I regroup on the underbrush I worked on the rails a bit.  I added styrene fish plates and NBWs to the aluminum rail, with the joints at 30' on center.  (I believe this is correct for narrow gauge rail...)
After some paint and weathering I'll spike these down.  It'll be good to do some test shots of the reefer on the new base, even without the plants finished.


* Shelf 24.jpg (143.54 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 739 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
pwranta193
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« Reply #116 on: September 11, 2011, 11:41:28 AM »

Great stuff - I'm looking forward to seeing your rail spike method.  This is one of the areas that I am largely ignorant of, crossing over from military.  One of the things that led me here was that I have the Trumpeter Reichsbahn loco (1:35) and a number of DML rail cars that I have wanted to make into a dio (for about 6 years), and in the process of researching learned that European rails are pinned differently than US lines.  So I have a bunch of US style spikes I got at a rail hobby store that are useless for my project  Roll Eyes - but I'm still looking forward to seeing your mounting process in this larger scale.  Are "fish plates" (correct term?) something that you can get massed produced for static displays or will you be making them from scratch?
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Paul

"Did I mention this is a bad idea?"
EZnKY
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« Reply #117 on: September 11, 2011, 01:49:31 PM »

Thanks Paul.  My plan is to spike the rails directly to the ties without using tieplates.  (Fish plates are the reinforcing plates used to connect the ends of the rails together at the rail joints.)
Most of the older, cheaply-built, or narrow gauge track was built without tieplates.  They were an additional expense I guess.  I've attached part of a shot taken by William Henry Jackson of some narrow gauge track somewhere out west - probably Colorado.  No tieplates. 

You can buy tieplates from Ozark Miniatures.  (No affiliation other than being a customer.)  www.ozarkminiature.com.
I bought a box of them to try.  They work nicely, but its just not the look I'm after.

You're right different attachment methods are used in much of Europe.  I've seen various kinds of chairs under the rails, and they often used big screws instead of railroad spikes.  I don't know much about the availability of detail parts for European track, but I know there are folks here that do.  I assume you follow the rail modeling on the Mig forums?  Especially from libor? 


* Shelf 26.jpg (98.43 KB, 496x400 - viewed 687 times.)

* Shelf 28.jpg (150.62 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 669 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
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« Reply #118 on: September 11, 2011, 01:54:44 PM »

I did manage to get the rails painted and ready to spike yesterday.  (No fun outside - it's been cold and raining here since Lee came ashore more than a week ago.)


* Shelf 27.jpg (177.98 KB, 1200x900 - viewed 740 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
Wilmore, Kentucky
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« Reply #119 on: September 12, 2011, 02:19:33 AM »

I predict your track should have a very satisfactory appearance, as should your foliage. -- Russ
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