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Author Topic: The other Krakow Auto Repair in 1/87 scale  (Read 32693 times)
BKLN
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« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2011, 09:59:50 PM »

Edit: Wow, that bold font looks like I am yelling.  Smiley Grin
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BKLN
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« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2011, 10:05:45 PM »

With the help of some NPR and some mexican beers I was able to make some good progress on the front wall.

I have to admit that I simplified the structure a little, so it's not worth counting bricks. But I think it captures the prototype. I also glued the side walls and back walls. Usually I prefer painting them first, but I changed my approach because of the "drawer interior". I had to make sure that all walls (except of the front wall) are in place before starting construction of the drawer element.

I also decided to simplify the side walls and the back wall. The left side wall and the back wall will have some light stucco with the brick showing in certain areas. The right will will be full brick. The front wall and the interior will be the eye catchers, so I think it is important that the rest of the building doesn't draw too much attention.

I am moving on to the interior now.


* krakows_08.jpg (79.79 KB, 600x447 - viewed 645 times.)
« Last Edit: January 29, 2011, 10:09:36 PM by BKLN » Logged
finescalerr
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« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2011, 03:12:55 AM »

The first floor looks very good. -- Russ
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2011, 07:46:35 AM »

This wall has a lot of character, Christian.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2011, 12:14:26 PM »

Very nice paint job. Looks very close to the prototype on page 1. This will be a great building.

Anders Grin
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2011, 01:53:48 PM »

But here is my cry for help. In shops like this, most of the electrical lines and pipes for the shop and the second floor would be exposed on the wall. I have absolutely no idea what kind of stuff would run along the wall, but after Anders' situation with the meter, I'd rather ask the crew here.
So if anybody can help out with some general information of what could / should be found on the walls, I would really appreciate it!


The facade looks great ... lots of character.  I think the key word your looking for above is "electrical conduit" ... image search for that produces limited success.  Couple examples:
http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Electrical/Electrical-Wiring/how-to-install-surface-mounted-wiring-and-conduit
http://www.rd.com/images/tfhimport/2004/20040501_Electrical_Conduit_page002img001_size2.jpg

Might be worth repeating the search on some of the photo sites like Photo Bucket, Fotki, etc ... also look for workshop and factory interiors to see if you can spot the features you want.

Many possible arrangements ... depending largely on how organized the original installation was.  Conduit could be run around the walls at belt level ... or closer to the ceiling.  Some installations quite neat ... some quite haphazard.

Cheers,
Dallas
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BKLN
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« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2011, 04:01:20 PM »

Thanks for the "electrical input" and the nice compliments. everybody.

I have been studying a lot shop photos, but it's hard to distinguish between all the lines. So let's start with the basics. My questions might sound ridiculous to some of you, but I really have no clue.  Undecided

I need fresh and waste water for the first and second floor. I guess those would be bigger pipes like the blue one in my sketch below, right? How many? On both walls?

The electric conduits: I guess one fat cable comes out of the ground to a box and what then?

Air compressor: I guess I want a stationary, electrically powered. How would that set up look like? Where do the pipes go? What is the compressed air used for? How do the hook ups look like?


* krakow_installations.jpg (51.56 KB, 482x430 - viewed 617 times.)
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2011, 06:44:21 PM »

Nice. I like the mismatched bricks on the second floor.
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granitechops
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« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2011, 05:36:40 AM »

Thanks for the "electrical input" and the nice compliments. everybody.

I have been studying a lot shop photos, but it's hard to distinguish between all the lines. So let's start with the basics. My questions might sound ridiculous to some of you, but I really have no clue.  Undecided

I need fresh and waste water for the first and second floor. I guess those would be bigger pipes like the blue one in my sketch below, right? How many? On both walls?

The electric conduits: I guess one fat cable comes out of the ground to a box and what then?

Air compressor: I guess I want a stationary, electrically powered. How would that set up look like? Where do the pipes go? What is the compressed air used for? How do the hook ups look like?
.
Waste water pipes, here in UK if its soil pipe coming down from upstairs toilet it would be 4" diam pipe,
 used to be cast iron with spigots, but is now plastic with smaller spigots or shoulders, Usually such would be routed out through the wall & down the outside, but I have seen them on the inside of industrial buildings
 if its just waste water from a hand  or kitchen sink then the pipe would be about 1.25" diam. with an S bend just below the sink bowl.
fresh water in, you might have 3/4" or 1/2"pipe  coming up from the floor to the  tap, could be 3/4 copper, or earlier it may have been galv steel pipes about 7/8" outside diam. ( I know plumbers use inside diam dimensions, but as  a modeller I find it easier to think what the OUTSIDE diam is  when visuallising material choice).
Earlier again it could have been lead pipe, but due to health concerns, & scrap values very few places have any of that left unless it is a protected hertitage building. More modern could be alkathene water pipe, which as it came off a reel could be quite characteristicly wavy instead of dead straight.
Off course if its 2 floors  & similar to a domestic arrangement it might even have a rising main up to the top floor or attic header tank, with the feed pipes coming DOWN from the header tank to the taps & appliances.
EDIT, of course as your are into 1/87 with this, probably pipe dimensions are not going to be that noticable.
And although I am modelling in  1/12th, I am following these garage threads with great interest, even if I dont comment much, great inspiration   Cool
« Last Edit: January 31, 2011, 06:32:33 AM by granitechops » Logged

Don in sunny Devon, England
BKLN
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« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2011, 07:48:26 AM »

I think I have a good idea regarding water pipes and electrical lines.

I found two neat illustrations online for the air compression system. I am gonna use those as a general concept.


* acpipinglayout3.jpg (101.07 KB, 1024x579 - viewed 632 times.)
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« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2011, 09:10:02 AM »

That would be just incredible..................... Huh Grin

Anders
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« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2011, 10:23:58 AM »

That pneumatic air system is way overkill, especially for a small rural shop 60+ years ago.
The basic set up is applicable but all the driers & regulators would not be the norm.
Just run a hose from the compressor to some hard lines, then some quick disconnects at the work areas.
-Marty
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #27 on: February 01, 2011, 10:30:26 AM »

In our small shop, a pipe comes from the compressor and runs along the 30' or so wall about 4 feet up. As Marty said, there are several tee fittings with quick disconnect fittings. In an adjoining building the same setup is used, but the pipe runs along a low cieling and we have to reach up to connect the hoses.

There are a couple of fittings towards the end that are excellent showers.
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BKLN
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« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2011, 10:50:11 AM »

Chuck, Marty,
that's all I needed to hear. On a second look, I realized, that one of the set ups was for a full paint shop, which is obviously why too much of an overkill. I'll just put a small stationary compressor with a pipe around the shop and a few connects.

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BKLN
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« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2011, 08:08:32 AM »

Time for a little post-weekend update:
I spent most of time to prepare the walls for the interior box. Shown here is the left side wall with the compressor for the air system and a couple of electric lines. I also built a little office box that will sit right behind the window of the left gate, but without any interior detail. Mr. Krakow tries to keep a low profile, so the doors to his office are usually closed.


* krakow_06.jpg (142.6 KB, 1046x702 - viewed 854 times.)
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