Westlake Publishing Forums
May 29, 2020, 10:54:50 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 [6]
  Print  
Author Topic: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To  (Read 33561 times)
TRAINS1941
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1347


« Reply #75 on: April 06, 2011, 08:55:55 AM »

Russ

Nice job.  Doesn't look anything like paper.

Jerry
Logged

Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2081



« Reply #76 on: April 06, 2011, 09:42:29 AM »

Is that the best you can do?
Gollly snapdragon, you have been messing around with this medium for years!
I wonder if the Gazette would publish an article? It certainly is more than adequate!

In all seriousness it is nice to see you modeling again, wonderful example and inspiration.
The only "real" complaint I have is the shingles also, not sure what to suggest though.
Like others I think the corrugated adds interest and can see it being done (by me!)

-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5643


« Reply #77 on: April 06, 2011, 12:52:42 PM »

My dearest young Martin,

Please resume your medication and spend more quality time with your therapist.

Cordially,

Russ

P.S.: Please be more specific about the failings of the shingles. Tom knows they are too thick so he's using thinner wood now. But if the problems go deeper than that, I'd like to find out where they miss the boat. Marc referred to shingle issues, too, but never followed up. How the heck are we supposed to learn if you guys don't teach us?
Logged
TRAINS1941
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1347


« Reply #78 on: April 06, 2011, 06:49:07 PM »

P.S.: Please be more specific about the failings of the shingles. Tom knows they are too thick so he's using thinner wood now. But if the problems go deeper than that, I'd like to find out where they miss the boat. Marc referred to shingle issues, too, but never followed up. How the heck are we supposed to learn if you guys don't teach us?

Now hell I just read Marc reply this afternoon what happen to it?HuhHuhHuh??

Jerry
Logged

Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #79 on: April 06, 2011, 10:08:04 PM »

Reply!?......what reply!? Huh Undecided

M
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
Philip Smith
Guest
« Reply #80 on: April 06, 2011, 11:03:15 PM »

Reply!?......what reply!? Huh Undecided

M

Did Russ took ya out to the woodshed after that floggin? Shocked

ouch!

 Shocked
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5643


« Reply #81 on: April 07, 2011, 02:16:08 AM »

Okay, you sharp eyed rascals, Marc and I spoke on the phone yesterday and he asked me to yank his post. On the phone he said staining wood shingles with an India ink and alcohol solution results in an unrealistically translucent rather than a more proper opaque finish. And he found the paper shingles too reminiscent of a "modeled" roof. For a more a "real" roof he suggested I scan some actual shingles or shakes and use that as a starting point for making new paper artwork.

I found three rotting and termite eaten shakes in my woodpile and will scan them forthwith.

Anything else Marc may want to add he will post himself.

(You guys notice everything; what a drag.)

Russ
Logged
Philip Smith
Guest
« Reply #82 on: April 07, 2011, 06:05:43 AM »

Russ,

I don't want to harp but your verticals are lining up incorrectly. This will leak when you have the vertical cracks aligned. This is a crop from your earlier comparison shot. Notice 4 in a row. Nothing underneath to divert the water down.

Philip



* Shingle_Comparison[1].jpg (27.62 KB, 123x196 - viewed 678 times.)
Logged
Malachi Constant
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1544



« Reply #83 on: April 07, 2011, 06:17:16 AM »

Roof, huh?
Maybe I shoulda said DiMaggio ...
Logged

-- Dallas Mallerich  (Just a freakin' newbie who stumbled into the place)
Email me on the "Contact Us" page at www.BoulderValleyModels.com
W.P. Rayner
Guest
« Reply #84 on: April 07, 2011, 07:34:35 AM »

Nicely done Russ and an architecturally interesting structure. However, I'm going to be seemingly the odd man out here... it looks texturally flat to my eyes. Perhaps it's just the photos or the lighting in the photos, I'm not sure, but the weathering and texturing all looks too consistent, too precise and lacking in volumetric space and depth. The test samples you were showing earlier didn't give that impression, at least up close, so perhaps it is just the lighting in the photos. Also, as you mention, final detailing is yet to be done. As far as corrugations on the roof going in the "wrong" direction, that's an interesting and humorous detail, but once again, it looks too neat. Only a slip-shod carpenter or a cheap-skate would do something like that, and the assembly seems too clean and precise to enhance that impression.

Ok that's my two cents worth (actually much less given the current state of the economy and pending government shutdown  Wink), so I'll go back to the corner now...

Paul
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5643


« Reply #85 on: April 07, 2011, 01:35:25 PM »

... And I thought this structure turned out relatively well. Oh, silly moi.

About the shingle spacing, Philip: That is the price we pay for using a commercial product. As I waited for the paper shingles that never arrived I seriously considered laying up the roof shingle by shingle. Had I done that you might have criticized the artwork but not the way the shingles lined up. (Also, had I done that, I would have completed the structure a month earlier.)

I read your earlier post about commercial shingles and their failure to align. I made sure to overlap the end shingles and hoped for the best as each row took shape but, without losing the advantage of laser cut shingles, it was impractical to snip the strip, correct the next shingle, and proceed. Using individual shingles would have been just as fast as that and, as I said, I decided against that.

Finally a thought about any model, music, photo, painting, poem, book, play, movie, or other creation: The creator takes it to whatever limit he considers appropriate and then calls it finished. Once it is on display he discovers that NOTHING, not even a Mozart concerto or a da Vinci Mona Lisa, pleases everyone.

Russ
Logged
BKLN
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 411


« Reply #86 on: April 07, 2011, 02:04:47 PM »

Russ,
I think it is actually the opposite: I think that very often, we are not fully satisfied with our results and that motivates to us to do better next time. The key for me personally, is to find the point when enough is enough. I find that to be incredibly difficult. I have many projects sitting unfinished on the shelf for one simple reason: I know better know. I see errors and I know that it easier to move on than to correct the wrongs.

- But how accurate do we have to be? How fine does finescale have to be? In most cases, we are are storytellers here. We tell a story about a vehicle or structure and were are painting a picture of it.

So if you are happy with the structure, leave it as it is. Your challenge was to refine your paper modeling, I think. Don't forget the bigger picture because of couple of wrong shingles.

Christian
Logged
W.P. Rayner
Guest
« Reply #87 on: April 07, 2011, 08:31:04 PM »

Finally a thought about any model, music, photo, painting, poem, book, play, movie, or other creation: The creator takes it to whatever limit he considers appropriate and then calls it finished. Once it is on display he discovers that NOTHING, not even a Mozart concerto or a da Vinci Mona Lisa, pleases everyone.
Russ

It did turn out well Russ and you are absolutely right. It is foolhardy for any individual to think that their creation will please everyone. As long as you are pleased, that's all that really counts. The pleasure it creates for others is a bonus. I offered up my thoughts in the spirit of the Forum and debated with myself for a couple of days on whether to do so. My feeling that friends are better served by being honest and direct with each other eventually won out.

Paul
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5643


« Reply #88 on: April 08, 2011, 02:53:24 AM »

Paul, I genuinely thank you for your comments. I can't learn unless somebody who knows more than I do points out what he considers deficiencies. And I think the other contributors to this forum feel the same way. I simply wanted to make a general comment about art (because many on this forum have taken their hobbies far beyond mere hobbies) and what happens when you present something to an audience.

I had an interesting and possibly related experience with my latest clarinet album. Most people like it or even love it. My former clarinet teacher, a real perfectionist and in some ways a musical genius, wished I had somehow taken it farther. You know, "I like it -- but ...." Still, I am satisfied with the album; it accurately reflects what I initially set out to create (rather than what he had in mind) and, given the obstacles I had to overcome and the way I chose to deal with them, I doubt I could have done it much better.

By reading all the stuff on this forum and listening to you guys and pushing myself I have managed to build each model a little better than the last. Whatever their shortcomings, the models I have posted here have far surpassed the standards I set for myself in the past. And each model exemplifies one or two new things I've learned from you.

I'm not a competitive modeler and I always draw a line beyond which I choose not to pass. But that line keeps moving forward and will until I get too old or until I go (completely) nuts. It is unlikely my models ever will rank among the best on this forum. But they sure are better than they were! And the greatest compliment I expect to receive from you rascals is, "That's a very good model ... except for ...." Yeah. That's a satisfactory compliment.

Russ
Logged
Gordon Ferguson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1039


« Reply #89 on: April 08, 2011, 08:28:11 AM »

Russ, completely agree with everything you said and I certainly feels the same ..... hopefully my models get a little better each time, most of the improvements (?) have come from incorporating learning points from here.

The Ultimate aim of course to get a "satisfactory" comment.
Logged

Gordon
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 [6]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!