Westlake Publishing Forums
May 30, 2020, 09:26:02 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 2 [3]
  Print  
Author Topic: Jacq's 1:35 adventure  (Read 16389 times)
shropshire lad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1487


« Reply #30 on: April 10, 2011, 04:13:55 PM »

Ray, you may want to read this wikipedia page about this style of building : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_framing


   Frederic,

  That is a pretty concise overview of timber framing and very informative .

  One thing I didn't see there is that just because a building has brickwork between the timberframing doesn't mean that it always has had brickwork there . There are a great number of timberframed buildings around that have brick infill panels that replaced previous panels of wattle and daub . This was either because the original panels decayed and were replaced with brick because it was easier or , I'm less sure I'm right here , that the use of brickwork became more fashionable and owners of buildings who could afford to spend the money changing the original panels would do so with brick .

  Having said that I would say that the panels in Jacq's model may well have had wattle and daub panels originally but I don't think the watermill building in Jacq's photos did . In fact , I find the combination of brickwork  and timberframing in that building quite confusing , in that,  I can't from the photos , deduce what that building looked like originally , or even if it has been changed at all . There is probably a simple explanation , but without a close examination I  can't tell .
Cor , I just made that sound as if I know what I'm talking about ,

 Nick
Logged
shropshire lad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1487


« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2011, 04:16:40 PM »

Jacq,

I remember a thread of an exhibition. The Dutch modelbuilder Jacq Damen showed the following scene.

Maybe it can inspire you a little!

Frithjof


Frithjof, the starter of this topic (Jacq01) and the Jacq Damen you mentioned in your message are the same ........... Grin Wink


  The clue is in the name !
Logged
Frederic Testard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 634



« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2011, 04:18:17 PM »

Thanks for the additionnal information, Nick.
I suspect Jacq knows quite well the story of this particular mill and will be able to solve some of the unanswered questions.
Logged

Frederic Testard
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4173



WWW
« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2011, 04:35:45 PM »

Thanks for the info!
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Marc988
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 148


« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2011, 01:00:33 PM »



    after the meeting was finished, I went to the Oostendorper watermill to get detail information on fachwerk construction and waterwheels for my 1:35 project.


    


Hi Jacq,

did you see the message I send you regarding the water powered sawmill ?

I borrowed (linked) the following pictures from another sites to give an impression;


The building to the left houses sawmill section. At the moment the mill is closed for the public but I am in contact with a representative.



 

A small movie with some footage of the insides you will find here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAMdZrWMbi4


Regards,
Marc

« Last Edit: April 11, 2011, 01:02:39 PM by Marc988 » Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!