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Author Topic: D. Krakow Auto Repair in 1/87 scale  (Read 126487 times)
Junior
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Anders "Junior"


« Reply #300 on: April 29, 2011, 04:15:20 AM »

Paul and Gordon, maybe these pictures would look better if they were cropped a bit or at least remove some of the bushes that now are a bit disturbing Huh. What do you think? So far I think they look better and thanks very much for the advice.

Anders  Grin
« Last Edit: April 29, 2011, 04:19:38 AM by Junior » Logged
Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #301 on: April 29, 2011, 04:45:44 AM »

Anders, your modelling just get better the more I study your photos.

I am no expert, in fact very much the bumbling amateur but FWIW here's my slight alterations , cropped slightly and I have adjusted the mid-tones ..... hopefully to give the effect of a hot, slightly dusty day.

 



Even with me mucking around with your photos its still great modelling
« Last Edit: April 29, 2011, 05:31:00 AM by gfadvance » Logged

Gordon
Junior
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Anders "Junior"


« Reply #302 on: April 29, 2011, 05:34:27 AM »

Thanks Gordon - improved again! The shadow of the camera lens was pretty obvious to me but the other things I hadn´t thought about.

Anders  Grin

PS. For those of you who are interested more pictures here: http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_anders_malmberg_krakow_s_auto_.html
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #303 on: April 29, 2011, 07:59:29 PM »

Great stuff! The eye-level views look superb.
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Bill Sartore
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« Reply #304 on: May 05, 2011, 09:22:16 AM »

Some of you asked how the wiring gets done on the little LEDs. I use a two-step process. First, I tin the wires that I will be using to attach to the LED. The wire has a heat-stripable insulation that burns off between 700 and 800 degrees F. Tinning and stripping is done in one step. Here is a link to a video that shows the process:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9483972/1-Tinning.wmv


There is no audio in the video as I normally just talk over it while showing it at the lighting clinic that I present. The first scene show the tools that I use. The tape is used to hold the pieces of wire. The damp sponge is used to keep the soldering iron tip clean. In the second scene i tin the wire by sticking it into the solder blob on the end of the soldering iron. The third scene shows the process in slow motion. What you want to achieve is a clean and distinct separation between tinned wire and insulated wire. I go on to show what happens if the solder is too hot. Here you'll see that there is a transition from tinned wire to uninsulated bare copper wire to insulated wire. This isn't good since the bare wires can short out when they get twisted together later on. If the soldering iron is too cold then the wire doesn't doo much of anything when you stick into the solder blob. It comes out the same way it went in. In needs the right amount of heat.

Unfortunately, the heat needed to tin/strip the wire is too much for the LED so we can't use that hot soldering iron to attach the wire directly to the LED in one step. After tinning the wire we attach the wire with a smaller, 12 watt soldering iron with a needle tip. I show the process here:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9483972/2-Soldering.wmv

Again. no audio but it's fairly self explanatory. The rosin flux pen isn't a necessity but it helps. You don't want to apply too much heat to the LED. That's why I like to keep the tip of the soldering iron off to the side and let the solder flow up the wire an onto the LED.

If anyone is crazy enough to want to do this send me an email and I can set you up with the necessary tools. The LEDs I wired for Ander's project were the yellow-white LEDs manufactured by Ngineering.com. They are the closest I've seen to an incandescent light in color. They're a little pricier than some other ones that I offer. The less expensive LEDs can be tinted but I thought that Anders would want the LEDs in his diorama to have a consistent color.

I still can't get over the job that Anders did on this project. You look at the photos and can smell the wood and oil and hear the crickets in the night shot.

Bill





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« Reply #305 on: May 05, 2011, 09:55:52 AM »

Woah ... and .. WOAH!! Excellent! (and don't try this after a couple cups of coffee!)
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Ed Traxler

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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #306 on: May 05, 2011, 12:09:11 PM »

Bill -- Thanks for the write-up and vids!

Anders -- Always nice to stop in again and have another look.  Wink

Cheers,
Dallas
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PuckHog
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« Reply #307 on: May 13, 2011, 10:02:16 PM »



  Hello Anders,  Had great fun going thru this thread!!!    Awesome modelling in my favorite scale,  Congratulations!!!


     Randy
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Junior
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Anders "Junior"


« Reply #308 on: May 16, 2011, 07:43:16 AM »

Thanks guys! Randy....favorite scale? Thought 1/25 would be your thing after seeing that monster build in the car thread.

Anders  Grin
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Stingray70
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« Reply #309 on: May 16, 2011, 03:49:31 PM »

Fantastisk detaljert, Anders!!! Thumbs up....

This is the most extreme modelling I've ever seen in this scale, Anders.
Its a joy to watch every time...

ff
Ove, Norway
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Ove Hetland

No problem is so big or so complicated that it can"t be run away from. ~ Charles Schulz.
Junior
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Anders "Junior"


« Reply #310 on: May 17, 2011, 02:11:49 AM »

Tack så mycket Ove and welcome to this great forum!

Anders  Grin
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