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Author Topic: Tips for weathering a painted black metal surface  (Read 7230 times)
JESTER
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« on: November 17, 2010, 08:29:17 AM »

I've never painted anything black before mostly because I don't know how to weather it.
Does anyone know any tips or tricks?

I guess I'd start with a Grimy Black and maybe do some washes with diluted white???

I'd be interested in any technique for rust, oxidation, exhaust, anything really! Grin


Tim
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lab-dad
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2010, 10:45:36 AM »

Depends on what you want to do......
Rust will show up, artists oils or powders work well.
Pigments mixed with alcohol (or other additives) will produce "lumps" and oxidation.
Again powders work for soot also.
Exploiting the talc in matte finishes and then using alcohol to make the white (lime) deposits.
Black/brown artists oils and powders for grease/oil (remember most grease is brown not black).

That should get you started.
-Marty
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finescalerr
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2010, 03:32:38 PM »

Grimy Black is often a better weathering color than a base color. It is just too gray to represent most in-service locomotives. That is not always the case, of course, but is true most of the time.

I'm not nearly as sophisticated or accomplished as some of the guys but have managed to get an acceptable finish with a pretty easy series of steps. If you are as clumsy as I am, you could try my approach and later improve on it by studying the masters.

I would suggest starting with semi-gloss black or almost black. When that dries, airbrush the model in appropriate areas with very dilute flat Grimy Black to represent dust, grime, and soot. Let the color fall naturally on the upper surfaces as though it were dust. It may be necessary to repeat the application several times to build up enough color and, for that reason, it could take two or three days. It's better to put on less than more and then check it the next day with a fresh point a view.

Those steps will provide a contrast in reflected light as well as bring out highlights. Then highlight detail in appropriate spots with weathering powders or powdered pastel chalks. (See Chuck Doan's posts on rebuilding a Fordson tractor as an ultimate example of what you may accomplish and exactly how to do it.) If you are good with washes, judicious dilute applications will work well and some of our weathering experts have explained what they do on various threads. Marc Reusser, for example, has posted several photos of models he has weathered with washes and has explained how he has "chipped" the paint. If you are not so great with washes, you might find powdered pastels easier to control. The result will be less precise but still acceptable.

If you are as clumsy as I am, you will have overdone some weathering effects. Bring out the airbrush again with a very dilute solution of near black and tone down the offending areas.

Finally, judicious light airbrushed applications of Dullcote or semi-gloss may further enhance what you've done. And you might add a few more touches of weathering powder ....

Now I'm going to let the other guys correct my approach or suggest better ones.

Russ
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2010, 03:33:46 PM »

A sh**load of info to sort and read trough, but lots of info and inpiration here http://www.migproductionsforums.com/phpBB3/viewforum.php?f=26&sid=9af152e2f43660eeab18ca8490ac4db3 .This was the "Rusty & Knocked-out" vehicle challenge /build on the MIG Forum.


Rob Ferreira (known on forums as Scratchmod) is also really outstanding in his rusty and weathered metal finishes http://site.scratchmod.com/Home.php...have a look in his 'Current Projects', 'Showcase', 'Gallery', & 'Techniques'.


Marc
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JESTER
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2010, 04:10:41 PM »

Thanks guys! I've faired OK with my rust and weathering (It's a bit extreme though) but shy away from black because it looks too daunting!

I'll go through the info and see what I can try!

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2010, 04:45:28 PM »

Do you have a ref. pic(s) of the look you are after?

The effect shown on the right tank below, could be done by using layered applications of paint and hairspray chipping, then following with some pigments (not pastels), and washes depending on the finished appearance you are after.

Virgil's salt approach would also work for this....or a combi of both.

Marc


* img_011.jpg (48.58 KB, 800x333 - viewed 1715 times.)
« Last Edit: November 17, 2010, 04:56:06 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

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JESTER
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2010, 04:59:53 PM »

Quote
Do you have a ref. pic(s) of the look you are after?

I want the model to be maybe 20 feet or so in real life. It's actually 2 feet and I haven't found anything that large to use as a reference.
I took the attached pic and like the way it's weathered though.

That tank you posted looks nice! The oxidation of the black is what I want to achieve.
I've done chipping effects with some watercolor resist but never used hairspray or salt. I think I can do the chips just not sure how to get the dull oxidized metal look.

I also like the look of Chuck Doan's Junkyard Locomotive. The matte surface with the rust looks great.


Tim


* DSC06366.jpg (152.07 KB, 900x600 - viewed 706 times.)
« Last Edit: November 17, 2010, 05:03:50 PM by JESTER » Logged

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