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Author Topic: Oil Wash -- Pigment test  (Read 19331 times)
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2010, 01:37:57 PM »

James:

I've always been really fascinated with the egg tempera process though have never tried it. If I remember correctly, the American painter Andrew Wyeth was a master with the medium.

Paul
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2010, 03:09:43 PM »

I have tried egg tempra, and though it can yield some nice effects, the fact that it continues to "re-activate" when worked over (even with oils)...has proven to be a greater annoyance than any possible results are worth.

Insofar as the original post issue, it really could be the paint you are using (could be inferior quality, or old) or it could be the thinner you are using...i have found that some thinners (turps)...especially the "odorless" variety are less agressive and seem to not dilute the oil paints as well as regular turps or white spirits.

A bit OT, but since it relates to oils and washes, one trick that comes in handy is when doing washes and filters, is to place a dab of the color(s) to be used on a piece of chip-board (the board on the back of writing pads) or strathmore, and allow some of the Linseed oil to wick out of the paint and into the board...then use the dab of paint to create your washes/filters.  The removal of some of the Linseed oil will help eliminate some to most of the sheen that often occurs with oils.

I also have to agree with Kevin, that the MIG oils seem to be superior to any of the artists oils brands I have (and I have quite a number)....their pigment seems to be very fine, they mix/thin very well, and they dry quite matte....at least that's my experience.


Marc
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« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2010, 03:44:19 PM »

Marc,     I was told buy the guys a Michigan Toy Soldier to buy the Mig 502 oils said there good quality for the price...  so i got some haven't used them yet.... just bought the basic colors  browns- black-white- flesh-rust colors. want to get more colors as money permits.      Craig H
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Craig
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« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2010, 03:24:36 AM »

Craig,

I think you will be quite happy with them.  Mo offense to Mich.Toy Soldier (I like their stuff and often unique selection)....but you can by MIG stuff directly from MIG USA (located in Portland, OR.)..  just saying it because prices mught be a bit less, and the stock/selection might be better.

http://migproductions-usa.com/


Marc
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« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2011, 09:21:50 PM »

Big thumbs up to Mig oils and pre mixed oil washes!  Got a box of goodies a few days ago, been experimenting with it, works as advertised.  All sorts of interesting effects possible.  I'm very happy with these, as they are priced about the same as art store oils & thinners, but work better as washes and the colors are pre mixed for weathering.   

This 1/160 scale leaning barn is base coated in craft store acrylic, then washed in various Mig oils to highlight the stones and individual planks.  All the weathering and rusting effects on the roof is Mig oil.   Seriously, the weathering effects here took a total of no more than 10 mins of work, not counting drying time.   Stuff works great!!



Thanks for the recommendations! 
 
Dave
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VectorCut.com
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« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2011, 01:06:19 PM »

Here is a scale wood grain effect I got by brushing streaks of thinned out Mig shadow brown over craft store acrylic brown.  The material is scribed cardstock.



These Mig paints flow like watercolors when thinned with the Mig thinner.  My other oils do not behave this way, they clump.  
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« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2011, 01:34:13 PM »

You probably could pass that off as wood and nobody would bat an eye. -- Russ
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2011, 01:41:45 PM »

These Mig paints flow like watercolors when thinned with the Mig thinner.  My other oils do not behave this way, they clump.  

Have stayed away from "pre-mixed" washes and such ... but will have to give these a try now ... thanks for the reports WITH photos!  (Neat stuff)  -- Dallas
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« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2011, 02:00:04 PM »

Yeah Dallas, I resisted buying them too, pre-mixed anything seems like admitting failure.   Grin   But there really is no good reason not to capitalize on the R&D behind these products, they are first rate and the price is fair.  Heck, the price is cheap.

Russ, yeah it really does look like wood, especially in person, because I've gone over it with a scratch brush so it has a very fine texture which didnt show in the photo.   The nice thing about painting card to look like wood, instead of using real wood, is the grain is not 87x too big.   Also better control of color.  A&I stained wood looks pretty good but it gets monotonous in miniature, real weathered wood in real world is a range of colors.  

Dave
  
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« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2011, 02:32:58 AM »

If I remember to do it, I'll shoot a macro photo of cardstock I ran through my photo printer. It may be instructive for all of us, especially me, to compare the results of that kind of "painted" wood card with real stains and pigments on card. (I already know what will look better; it's just how much better ....) -- Russ
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2011, 03:50:16 PM »

Craig, the article you're looking for in the Gazette was published in May 1993, page 83.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2011, 10:57:27 AM »

Hi Dave,

I finally got a chance to stop by.  Your "experiments" look great - glad that you're enjoying the products.  I'm always around to give a hand or answer questions if you need.

Hey Marc...thanks for the mention.


Take care,
Rick
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