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Author Topic: Weathering in the LARGER scales  (Read 8383 times)
Carlo
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« on: November 18, 2011, 11:10:05 AM »

Hello, all -

I model in 1/12 scale, and have had all sorts of problems with weathering, as some of you have seen, and pointed out.

So... I really want to learn how to better make my models look realistic. Is there a good book or thread here which can give me the basics?
Can anyone address the basic differences in the approach to weathering in small (1/48, 1/35) vs. LARGE (1/16, 1/12) scales?
They don't seem to translate directly somehow.

Also, can someone (Marc?) give me links or references to SBS Tutorials on "filters" and other basic techniques as used to weather?
AND, what is the currently favored method of "chipping"?

Carlo
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finescalerr
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 02:38:35 PM »

Yo, Carlo!

Do you have any of the previous Modelers' Annuals? If so, read Chuck Doan's articles. He describes chipping and peeling and other techniques for his 1:16 and 1:24 models. If you don't have them, look him up on Fotki.com and read the captions to his photos.

Marc or one of the other gurus will explain the use of filters and washes in detail but, for now, think of a filter as a thin layer of color that does the same thing as a photographic filter: It subtly changes the color of a portion of a model.

Russ
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 03:17:59 PM »

One these days im goint to just start a sticky on all these techniques. Grin

Carlo...there are links...but they are scattered about in forums....so I will have to see if I come up with some that apply. Give me a bit...I am swamped with work and project deadlines at the moment.

The hairspray and the salt method are the approaches that seems to be the current standard/en vogue....however, there is never just one method, most often, to get the proper look and variety and prototypical effects, you will likely need to employ a variety of techniques....especially at the larger scales. Some of the chipping techniques that one would use for chipping:

Hairspray chipping
Salt chipping
Sponge paint applied chips
Brush painted chips
Rubber cement or masking fluid chipping (I personally don't care for this approach...and know of only a small number of people that do this well and realisticaly)
Per Olav does a neat technique with bare metal foil.

Also you do not want to forget "Positive Chipping"......this is painting in chips of color, in corners and crevaces and surfaces where paint chips and flakes might remain....but there is none on the model, from/due to, the chipping technique used.

Will write more later......
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 04:48:22 PM »

26 pages of Chuck's 1:16 techniques here:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10409

Cheers,
Dallas
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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 06:41:00 PM »

One these days im goint to just start a sticky on all these techniques. Grin

Carlo...there are links...but they are scattered about in forums....so I will have to see if I come up with some that apply. Give me a bit...I am swamped with work and project deadlines at the moment.

The hairspray and the salt method are the approaches that seems to be the current standard/en vogue....however, there is never just one method, most often, to get the proper look and variety and prototypical effects, you will likely need to employ a variety of techniques....especially at the larger scales. Some of the chipping techniques that one would use for chipping:

Hairspray chipping
Salt chipping
Sponge paint applied chips
Brush painted chips
Rubber cement or masking fluid chipping (I personally don't care for this approach...and know of only a small number of people that do this well and realisticaly)
Per Olav does a neat technique with bare metal foil.

Also you do not want to forget "Positive Chipping"......this is painting in chips of color, in corners and crevaces and surfaces where paint chips and flakes might remain....but there is none on the model, from/due to, the chipping technique used.

Will write more later......

  Marc ,

   You forgot to include drybrushing . It's still big over on this side of the Pond !
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 08:27:15 PM »

Nick,

I don't really consider drybrushing a "chipping" method...rather a highlighting and shading method (unfortunately most guys that use it, look more like their trying to frost a cake.)

...well, let me clarifyt/elaborate on that and the previous methods noted....these were all in relation to "chipping" of METAL surfaces.

Worn and peeling wood would be different methods (some of the prior ones would work for wood also...as does drybrushing).


M
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2011, 01:04:59 AM »

If you are working with acrylics only....or want to try using acrylics and water based paints for all aspects of painting and weathering, there is a DVD out by Mig Jimenez & Vallejo Paints that has SBS's covering, washes, chipping, fading, rust, grease....and much more. Not sure if the subject/tank he is using for demonstration is 1/35 or the larger 1/12? 1/16? (The reason I am not sure, is because I have seen the tank in both scales by him).  ....Anyhow....maybe you can find one or borrow one.

His results in the video, are of course up to his usual style/quallity/ standards.

I personally am not sold on doing all the weathering and such with acrylics (and I haven't really tried).....but that's just me and the way I like to work But I think this video offers up a really good option for those that want to try/do this. Sure reduces the amount of supplies needed  Grin.


M
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 01:09:46 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2011, 01:21:00 AM »

Though I haven't seen it yet (mine should be here in short order) those that missed the first edition of the FAQ book maywant to consider doing as Nick did and suggested, and pre order the FAQ-2 book that should be available/shipping in time for xmas. I am pretty sure that this will cover and answer many of these questions/techniques. Those in the US can order it direct from Iain at AK Interactive USA.

http://www.ak-interactive-usa.com/
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 01:23:09 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2011, 02:55:42 AM »

Nick,

I don't really consider drybrushing a "chipping" method...rather a highlighting and shading method (unfortunately most guys that use it, look more like their trying to frost a cake.)

...well, let me clarifyt/elaborate on that and the previous methods noted....these were all in relation to "chipping" of METAL surfaces.

Worn and peeling wood would be different methods (some of the prior ones would work for wood also...as does drybrushing).


M

  Sorry , Marc , I was being facetious . Drybrushing doesn't really feature much these days with most modellers .

   Nick
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shropshire lad
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2011, 03:04:16 AM »

Though I haven't seen it yet (mine should be here in short order) those that missed the first edition of the FAQ book maywant to consider doing as Nick did and suggested, and pre order the FAQ-2 book that should be available/shipping in time for xmas. I am pretty sure that this will cover and answer many of these questions/techniques. Those in the US can order it direct from Iain at AK Interactive USA.

http://www.ak-interactive-usa.com/

 I tried pre-ordering direct from the AK Interactive website and was getting along fine until it was time to pay . After giving all my details in English the part requiring card details suddenly returned to Spanish , and as my Spanish is non-existent I gave up . I did email them , but have had no reply .
  I have since pre-ordered a copy from Duncan Buchanan at www.dbmodels.co.uk . He reckons to get some copies  in mid-December . Incidentally this is where I bought my two sets of barbed wire from .

  I don't reckon this book will be available for that long , so if you think you might want one and are willing to pay the price get it sooner rather than later ,

    Nick
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