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Author Topic: Painting questions for the experts  (Read 13463 times)
DaKra
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« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2011, 07:27:10 AM »

Hey Marc

I have a similar model Iwata, bought it in November to upgrade my workhorse brush, but haven't really used it yet because the instructions that come with the brush are mainly in Japanese, with a Japanglish translation.   And the instructions tell me not to remove a mystery part, not identified in the exploded view.    Undecided

If you could explain your usual cleaning procedure for your brush, that would be very helpful.     Apparently its very easy to clean the Iwata.  But with the fixed paint cup, it doesn't field strip like my other brush, so I'm not sure how to get at the internals, or if its necessary.  


Thanks!
Dave
    
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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2011, 08:10:05 AM »

Dave , sent you a PDF to your e-mail address that may assist
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« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2011, 03:21:01 AM »

Mike:
Here is a thread on the MIG Forum which discusses Iwata airbrushes, and some others as well. May be of interest.


Gordon:
Can I please get a copy of that as well. Am curious.


Dave:
My cleaning is pretty basic. I use it for acrylics, so during extended breaks while spraying, I will empty and wipe out the cup, then I will run through some 99% Iso alcohol, and rinse the whole brush front in a small cup of the iso. When the airbrush is sitting there I will leave the cup filled with Iso...then when I start back up, I will dump the Iso, and shoot some distilled water, or some Tamiya thinner...depending on the paint...to rinse the Iso. out of the works (don't want unexpected reactions with the paint or surface thats being shot).

When done shooting I will repeat the first part from above, and if necessary due to any seriously dried /set paint, also shoot some laquer thinner through, and rinse the nozzle in same. I will then pull the needle wipe it, shoot some more Iso or Lacq. thinner through. Will then use a Q-tip and and soft cloth or piece of paper towel (and on occasion a pipe cleaner) to get down into the cup and into the needle canal a bit. Shoot some more Iso....reinsert the needle, pull it back out....wipe it on a soft rag to see if it is clean.  I will do this till I am satified that the AB is clean enough to meet my stsndards. If necessary I will use an aurbrush reamer, or the back of the needle inserted into the needle canal, to remove/loosen any stubborn residue.  During all this I will also remove the tip and clean that with Iso/Lacquer thinner using a Q-tip and/or a soft rag.  If during use I felt that the the spray/air button is feeling a bit sticky, I will pull it out and clean it in a cup of Iso/Lacq. thinner.  Depending on use, once or twice a year I will break the brush down completely and soak everything in lacq. thinner, and if/where necessary will carefully use some very fine steel wool on the needle shaft and any of the internal moving parts if I feel there is any old paint residue that is causing them to bind or not move as smoothly and freely as they should.


It sound a lot more tedious than it is...the whole cleaning process only takes about 5-mins.


HTH.,

Marc
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« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2011, 11:56:30 AM »

Don't disregard the Grex airbrush.   Really like this one.  

http://www.amazon.com/Grex-Genesis-XT-Trigger-Gravity-Airbrush/dp/B002XQ2K5M

Similar assembly to Iwata and Iwata also makes a trigger control but costs more.

Cleaning, I use http://www.amazon.com/Iwata-Medea-NAC-201-Cleaning-Station/dp/B000VADIVC/ref=pd_sim_dbs_t_2

And you can read this thread on the forum for more info http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1188.0
 Cool
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Dave Mason
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CN6401
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2011, 06:02:36 PM »

Guys,
If I can add my few cents?
This is my first post for this forum, as today I became a member.
I have been a member of Model Trains Weathered forum for about six years now. I have learned to use Winsor Newton Artists Gouaches, they are an opaque form of watercolor paint in a tube. Did I mention they are water based? the nice thing is if your not happy with the results you can use a Kleenex and some car window washer fluid, wipe it off and start again.

For those that don't like Turpentine or Var-sol for artists oils because of the smell, you can now get odorless solvent for your oils.

The only beware I have is shop around for prices before you buy the Gouaches and/or the odorless solvent.
Here in Canada the best place to buy these items is an true artist supply company not Micheal's. Both items are priced three times higher at Micheal's then at the Artist Supply companies.

Ralph
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Ralph Renzetti
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CN6401
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« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2011, 06:35:34 PM »

Attached is a photo of an engine done with Tamiya white mixed 90% alcohol 10% or less color to fade the black engine color. The weathering is a combination of AIM powders and artist Gouaches. The rust on the body and the trucks and wheels is Artists Gouache.
I almost forgot. The oil stains on the fuel tank is done with Mig Products dark wash, a few coats until you're satisfied and then a coating of Future Floor Finish to make it look wet. I model in HO
I hope you approve of the process, it works in any scale?
Ralph



« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 01:18:13 AM by CN6401 » Logged

Ralph Renzetti
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finescalerr
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« Reply #21 on: August 20, 2011, 02:15:51 AM »

Not bad. At first I thought I might be looking at a large scale model. Then I looked more closely and deduced the scale. If you're good enough to throw me off scent, even for a moment, you know what you're doing. -- Russ
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michael mott
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« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2011, 11:59:02 PM »

Chuck said
Quote
I also build and paint as I go rather than do the whole build first, which requires some different thinking.

Chuck this is something that I have noticed a few modellers do, for some reason I have been reticent to do this. What are the pros and cons of painting as you go versus painting the model after it is built?

regards Michael
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