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Author Topic: Peeling paint on corrugated paper  (Read 15136 times)
Scratchman
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« on: June 29, 2007, 10:34:43 PM »

Peeling paint on corrugated  paper

For the 1/2? scale modeler Russ Simpson has corrugated metal made from paper. This comes in 4? x 10? sheets with the corrugation running on the short side giving you 8-scale foot sheets. After finishing painting steps 1 and 2 I cut into strips 1 1/8 ?wide giving you a scale 2? 3?wide sheets. Now you can move on to the rest of the painting steps.

Step 1: One coat of  Floquil Engine Black on both sides. While still wet, a light overspray of  Floquil Boxcar Red on the back side.  Let set for an hour or so (the paint will set up fast  on the paper) .

Step 2:  On the front side one or two coats of Floquil Reefer Gray and on the last coat, while still wet, a light over spray of Floquil Boxcar Red (at this point I cut into scale 8? 0? x 2? 3? sheets.).

Cutting: A sharp hobby knife or a paper cutter works for this. Make sure the cut is parallel with the corrugation.

Step 3:  For the resist part, I use a liquid frisket. I will transfer the frisket using an old paint brush over to a pad and form a small puddle. Now with a strip of scour pad I dab into the puddle and then onto the work piece.

Step 4:  One coat of Reefer White and after it has dried for a short time I rub with a rubber cement eraser to remove the frisket.

Step 5:  Using real rust, dust over the work and then apply a coat of Dull Cote. If you need a piece to be more rusted then you can repeat this step.

After the pieces are installed oil washes can be used for the paint.  I only use Floquil paint in a rattle can, it is different than the bottle stuff.


  Image #1 showing steps 1 and 2

  Image #2 showing steps 3 and 4

  Image #3 showing step #5

  Image #4 is showing the sheets on my section house where I have added bolt heads to each sheet. The oil washes have not been completed.

  Image #5 is a close up with only the first five steps being done.

  Image #6 is a close up with some pin washes around the bolt heads but the darker sheets are from repeating of step #5.
 

Note:  The section house is under construction and will have more weathering and detail added, and being a contest entry I will have no finished images until after the contest is over.
 
I will keep experimenting with this and try some of Marks techniques.

Gordon Birrell
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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finescalerr
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2007, 01:31:02 AM »

So far no other entry is even in the same galaxy as your diorama, young Gordon. -- Russ
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2007, 06:36:49 PM »

Gordon

That is simply outstanding.  But what is liquid frisket?

Jerry
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George Carlin
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2007, 07:52:23 PM »

Jerry,

The frisket is a masking liquid used in water painting. The brand I use is Incredible White Mask Liquid Frisket.

There probably are other brands and I suppose they all work the same.

Gordon

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Hector Bell
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2007, 05:36:31 AM »

Jerry, I think the name comes from the original airbrush masking film called Frisk Film.  I guess a "lesser" substance might be called a "frisket".  Humbrol (or whatever they're called now) made a ghastly purple one called Maskol.  Being a Humbrol hater, I use a Rowney product which is white, going clear on drying, made as Gordon says for the watercolourists and so, available in all good art shops as they say.  It's not the most controllable kind of paint and dries qickly making life a bit difficult, but, hey! we don't want easy, do we guys?<g>  Hector
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Scratchman
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2007, 03:59:45 PM »

Peeling paint on corrugated paper

Samples with Reefer White over Gray    (A 1-2)

Samples with Dark Green over Gray       (A 3-4)

Samples with Boxcar Red over Gray       (A 5-6)

Samples with Reefer White over Black    (B 1-2)

Samples with Dark Green over Black       (B 3-4)

Samples with Boxcar Red over Black       (B 5-6)

I did some samples of White, Green and Red. I still like the White the best the darker colors don?t work as well as the White using these techniques. I did a set of samples over Reefer Gray with a light over spray of Boxcar Red while still wet and a set over Engine Black with light over spray of Boxcar Red while still wet. Even number samples have real rust dusted on with a coat of Dull Cote and odd numbers has only the coat of Dull Cote.The paint Floquil in the rattle can.



#1: All samples

#2: Close up White

#3: Close up Green

#4: Close up Red

Gordon Birrell ?Scratchman
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finescalerr
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2007, 01:08:54 PM »

If you look carefully, the dark colors "work" as well as white but the relative lack of contrast makes them appear less effective. Compare to actual corrugated structures of the same color and the model panels would look about the same as the full size counterparts. Nice work, Gordon. -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 08:22:36 AM »

Cool stuff Gordon! I like that building a lot! Here's a nice example from Flickr:

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1303/763549752_d301d0e694_o.jpg

Compares nicely.


CD
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http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
Hector Bell
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2007, 01:44:47 PM »

Hi all,  very nice work.  We don't tend to see much light painted corr. tin over here, but have a lot of tarred stuff, which shows dull galvanising or rust or both when the tar falls off. Tarr tends to wear away rather than flake.  It is and remains quite a while, very black, but slowly goes a brownish tinge of grey, but remains very dark for long time.  It's one of the only times you could use black without letting it down a little.  Any thoughts on doing tarred galvo?  Hector
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Scratchman
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« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2007, 10:24:24 PM »

I cut the corrugated paper into 2?2? sheets for use on my 1:16 scale two seat vault privy. In this scale the longest sheet is 5?4?but works well on a small building like this privy and the fence. After gluing the sheets to the roof boards and fence framing, I added nail heads using Grandt Line rivet head casting # 154 with the tops sanded flat painted and placed into pre-drilled holes. I am almost finished with a build report and will start a new thread on this forum in the next day or two; some of the photos are all ready over on my flickr page.   



http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/

Gordon Birrell - Scratchman
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