Westlake Publishing Forums
November 28, 2021, 06:03:32 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 02:57:35 AM 
Started by Hauk - Last post by finescalerr
Please pop in more often, Eric. -- Russ

 2 
 on: November 27, 2021, 09:38:16 PM 
Started by Hauk - Last post by EZnKY
Hauk,
I like your philosophy and tend to follow the same approach with my own work.
One option to consider would be adding an operable sash down low on each window.  These were important air "intakes" to encourage convective ventilation in the days before air conditioning.
It's a minor detail, but it would add some variation to the window framing and make them less static.  My two cents...

 3 
 on: November 27, 2021, 08:35:13 AM 
Started by Hauk - Last post by Hauk
Hauk
There are two ways to create more plasticity in etched parts:
- Build up from several layers.
- Symmetrical etching from both sides of the sheet. This requires separate etching films for front and back. Black surfaces are not etched. White areas on one side are removed up to half the thickness of the material. White areas on both sides are etched through.

PPD Ltd. that does my etchings do indeed use two-sided etchings.
So I design all my etching artwork in two layers, one for the back and one for the front. This also allows for relief effects like raised rivets, folding lines etc.

Regarding multiple layers for building up mass I can clearly see that it has it uses, but for the windows I will settle for the 0,6 thick version of the windows.

When it comes for using lasercut paper/cardboard for the windows, I am for better or worse too attached to my "Philosophy" of using a modelling material that is as close to the prototype mateial as possible. So the perfect solution would be a metal casting, but a etched metal sheet is the next best thing. I can certainly see limitations to this approach, you just have to look at the marvelous styrene work others on this group do. 

 4 
 on: November 27, 2021, 02:26:57 AM 
Started by Hauk - Last post by finescalerr
What if you were to laser cut a stiff, strong paper like Strathmore Bristol Plate? The single "ply" thickness is 0.006" and it goes up to five ply (0.030"). Might that serve as an alternative to etched metal? If it's too flexible, you may brush on acrylic lacquer to make any paper about as stiff as styrene. -- Russ

 5 
 on: November 27, 2021, 02:20:44 AM 
Started by Barney - Last post by finescalerr
Young Nicholas, you are a disruptive influence. I must have a talk with your mommy. Even so, I don't know what we should do with you. I just don't know .... -- Russ

 6 
 on: November 26, 2021, 09:17:15 PM 
Started by Barney - Last post by VilledeGrace
This is fantastic Barney. The detail is spot on!

 7 
 on: November 26, 2021, 03:26:35 PM 
Started by Barney - Last post by shropshire lad
Now, now children. Stop squabbling. Kiss and make up otherwise Uncle Russ will make you both stand in the corner
Les

 Yes, Miss.  Sorry , Miss... but he started it .

 I am already in the corner from 2016 so that is not much of a threat !

 8 
 on: November 26, 2021, 02:27:00 PM 
Started by Hauk - Last post by Bernhard
Hauk
There are two ways to create more plasticity in etched parts:
- Build up from several layers.
- Symmetrical etching from both sides of the sheet. This requires separate etching films for front and back. Black surfaces are not etched. White areas on one side are removed up to half the thickness of the material. White areas on both sides are etched through.

Ray:
Brass is difficult to laser cut because reflections from the material can damage the laser optics. It is better to use nickel silver as an alternative.

Bernhard

 9 
 on: November 26, 2021, 02:25:47 PM 
Started by Barney - Last post by Barney
"HERCULE' The diesel tractor critter has now moved down the track to allow " FITSGERALD " The Steamer -To RIP at the end of the track in the undergrowth
Barney

Tomorrow the great day of the Spray shop all cleaned up and ready to go !! Humbrol undercoat of rust at the ready


 10 
 on: November 26, 2021, 01:38:02 PM 
Started by Barney - Last post by Bernhard
A really pretty little steamer. I am already curious how she looks painted and weathered.

Bernhard

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!