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General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: Ray Dunakin on August 28, 2009, 11:57:08 AM



Title: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on August 28, 2009, 11:57:08 AM
The past few days I've been trying to decide on a design for the next building in my town of Dos Manos. It will be positioned next to the rock shop, with stairs in between leading up to another structure higher on the hill. I'm using an old 3D modeling program to work out the design.

At first I was thinking of making two narrow buildings, something like this:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/DosBuildingsTest1.jpg)

The problem is that the two buildings would have to be extremely narrow, bordering on caricature. My first two structures are already very small, so I don't want to push it too much, especially since the next buildings will be much larger.

So here's the design I came up with for a single building:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/DosBuildingsTest2.jpg)


I think the proportions are much better with this one. What do you think?

BTW, the textures shown here are just a rough approximation.




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on August 28, 2009, 08:04:19 PM
Ok here are two shots of the site:
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3877.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3880.jpg)

I tried dropping in the 3D model images to get a rough idea of how they might look. I know I didn't get the perspective right, especially on the first one, so I'm not sure how accurate these are. But both designs look pretty good:
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3880a.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3880b.jpg)


Now I'm not sure which one I like better!
 
 
BTW, the CG models are just simple mockups. I didn't bother adding all the fine detail that will be on the actual models.




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on August 28, 2009, 10:28:46 PM
Hey Ray,

I like the second choice... it seems to blend into your current look/feel better

the arches on the first choice seem to take away from the timeline deplicted. it looks (architectually more modern then the surounding enviornment) IMO

maybe my lack of experience in modeling but I am just saying what comes to thought...

I still LOVE the rock shop...with that amazing interior

your garden lay-out has made me think about my back yard in a different way.  ::)  (very inspiring Ray)

Mike






Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on August 29, 2009, 02:00:13 AM
I also prefer the second building. It's size seems more convincing and its overall design seems to fit well with what you already have. -- Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: jacq01 on August 29, 2009, 05:10:30 AM

   I'll second ( or thirdth ??) the two other opinions. This will definitely not turn the total into a possible caricature set.

   Jacq


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: NORCALLOGGER on August 29, 2009, 08:41:12 PM
Hi Ray,
Definitely, what's behind door #2.
Nice proportion and style.  I don't know what you
have in mind for that building but to me it looks like the
perfect saloon and hotel.
cool project.

Later
Rick Marty


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on August 30, 2009, 11:48:53 PM
I built a very simple mockup of the two smaller buildings. I didn't bother mocking up the second floor of the building on the left...

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/DosBuildingsMockup1.jpg)

I determined that the second floor of both buildings could be extended back onto the rocks, giving each of them a good five inches of additional depth. So I reworked the 3D models. I eliminated the stairs, and replaced them with a wall and door -- the stairs to the second floor are now "implied", somewhere in the building. I also recessed the second floor on the wooden building a little; and I replaced the brick building's arches with rectangular doors and windows.

As before, I did not bother putting in all the fine details such as doors and window mullions; and the textures shown are not necessarily the materials that will be used on the final models.

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/DosBuildingsTest5.jpg)


Then I pasted the CG image into a photo of the town site:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3880d.jpg)


I like this version for three reasons...

1. Extending the buildings back onto the hillside ties the town into the landscape and also breaks up the "row of boxes" look a little bit.

2. The added depth makes the narrow buildings seem a little more plausible.

3. Using two narrow buildings here, creates a nice transition to the larger buildings that will be added later.


Any thoughts/comments?




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 06, 2009, 10:21:02 PM
I made one more 3D mockup:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3880e.jpg)


As you can see I made a few modifications to the building on the left. I also changed the building on the right from brick to stone, and went back to arched windows for the second floor.  As before, this image still doesn't have every detail in place, but it's close enough now that I've finally started work on the actual models.

I'm building the left structure first. I began by building up the shops from styrene strips:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3909.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3916.jpg)


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3923.jpg)


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3930.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3942.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3945.jpg)

I've finished the windows that go on either side of the door. Next, I'll make the door and join the three assemblies together.


BTW, the large wooden building that everyone liked will be built eventually, in a different location.




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on September 07, 2009, 02:04:11 AM
Looks very good so far. -- Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 07, 2009, 02:27:05 AM
Hey Ray,

Nice . . . Very Nice... did you create the wood grain?
or do you get the raw materials with the grain?

the work looks nice and clean.

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 07, 2009, 11:22:51 AM
I created the wood grain myself. First I scraped the styrene strips with a fine-toothed razor saw. Then I pulled them through a folded over piece of 50-grit sandpaper.




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 07, 2009, 04:21:39 PM
That's a great tip,

I will have to try that..

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 07, 2009, 08:00:36 PM
I've finished assembling the shop windows and door:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3946.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3947.jpg)

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3952.jpg)



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 08, 2009, 01:07:10 AM
Hey Ray,

that shop frontage came out really nice...

did you mill down the edges of the center panels? or is there another piece attached? it is a nice touch..

Can't wait to see this build...I am sure there will many things for me to learn from this.. thanks for posting/sharing

you also explain things which is good for guys like me... new to learning these kinds of techniques.

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ken Hamilton on September 08, 2009, 06:31:34 AM
That facade looks really nice, Ray.  Love the wood grain.


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 08, 2009, 09:36:15 AM
Thanks! The center of the panel is a separate piece of .010" sheet.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: chester on September 08, 2009, 06:33:07 PM
You work fast Ray. And the front came out wonderful! I'm not convinced the arched windows fit but that's just a personal feeling.


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 08, 2009, 06:48:56 PM
Hey Ray,

Are you going to work the inside of this structure as well? (I can still picture the rock shop...amazingly realistic.)

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 08, 2009, 07:52:37 PM
Oh yes, with all those windows the interior has to be detailed! I haven't decided yet what type of shop it will be. I'm considering a candy shop, a bakery, maybe a dress shop... something visually interesting but not too painful to construct.




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 09, 2009, 11:33:19 AM
More progress... most of the exterior walls don't need detailing as they will be hidden, so they went together pretty quickly. 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3965.jpg) 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3967.jpg) 


I still have to detail the front of this small extension on the side. The door there will not have a window, so I'm just going to build the door right on the wall, and then build up siding around it.

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3966.jpg) 


Here's a test fitting to see how the building will look alongside the others: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3958.jpg) 


I chiseled out some of the rocks on the cliff, to make room for the rear extension of the second story.: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3963.jpg)   




Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 09, 2009, 01:24:03 PM
Hey Ray,

coming along very nicely... and pretty quickly at that...

Those are some big windows... what do you plan on using for the glass?

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 09, 2009, 05:29:31 PM
Mike, I'll probably use the .030" polycarbonate from Caboose Hobbies. I've been told it should hold up well outdoors. I used it on the rock shop and have had no problems so far. I'm using Testor's "Clear Parts Cement" to glue in the poly. This cement is flexible and can be easily cut out in case I ever have to replace the poly.






Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on September 09, 2009, 10:39:07 PM
Hey Ray,

Yeah... those windows in the rock shop sure did look good (the large door window was very nice.)

well keep at it...

(It is pretty cool that the structures are holding up to the real world enviornmental elements)

Mike
 


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 12, 2009, 08:51:49 PM
Another update... 

I built the overhang that extends out over the sidewalk, and started on the roof for that portion of the building: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3976.jpg)   


That part of the roof is designed to lift off for access into the interior: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3977.jpg)   


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3980.jpg)   


I also made the door at the side of the building, and added the siding. The door turned out a bit rough but it's supposed to be old and weathered so I think it'll be alright: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3975a.jpg)   


I put in thick strips around the interior at the base, to support the floor; and near the top to support the ceiling: 

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3978.jpg)   


Pretty soon I'll be ready to start on the second floor.   






Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 16, 2009, 12:33:15 PM
I'm working on the second floor of the building now. I decided to make working windows, mainly just to see if I could do it. It turned out to be pretty easy. Here's one window, unpainted and without glass. I'll add the glass after it's painted:   
 
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3987c.jpg)   
   
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3984c.jpg)   
   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/wIMG_3988c.jpg)   
   
   
   


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: marc_reusser on September 16, 2009, 11:16:35 PM
This is really coming out nice. Thanks for the SBS.

The new windows look great.


Marc


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: John McGuyer on September 16, 2009, 11:36:04 PM
I particularly like all the fine detailing around all the frames.

John


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: LLOYD on September 20, 2009, 01:28:59 AM
Hello Ray,

you make a great styrene work on this Old West building!
I realy like this !!!

Sincerely!

Lloyd


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: chester on September 20, 2009, 08:23:48 AM
Makes me want to do everything in styrene Ray. A very nice job. Your wood graining looks excellent and I'm entirely impressed with the window details.


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on September 21, 2009, 11:04:50 PM
Here's the second level of the building, in progress...   
         
The rear wall is only roughly textured, as it will be against the cliff and not easily visible. The right side wall is almost completely untextured, as it will butt up against the fourth building in the row. I just roughed up the styrene a little to help the paint adhere. Both the rear wall, and the right side wall, are made of .125" thick styrene sheet:       
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4045.jpg)   
   
 
   
The front wall and left wall are made of Evergreen "V-groove" siding, with .250" spacing. The siding is laminated onto .080" plain styrene sheets. I used a small piece of hacksaw blade, mounted in an X-acto knife handle, to scribe wood grain into the "boards":       
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4042.jpg)   
   
 
 
Here's a look at the bottom of the second floor structure. The bracing not only provides support but also keys the second floor into the top of the first story structure:       
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4040.jpg)   
   
   
     
This is the underside of the roof, showing the bracing. The triangular pieces are cut from .125" thick sheet. The rest of the bracing is just random scrap pieces of styrene strips. The roof "planks" are Evergreen "V-groove" with .5" spacing. The roof only has eaves on one side, since the other side will be against the fourth building. At this stage, the roof is just a simple peak, but later I will add a special structure to deal with drainage on the non-eave side:
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4046.jpg)   
   
 
 
Here are a couple shots showing how the building fits into the scene, with the second floor supported by the first floor in front, and by the cliff in back. Notice how some of the "planks" on the facade appear to be raised... I accomplished this by gluing strips of .005" thick styrene, to represent boards which have been warped or loose with age:       
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4038.jpg)   
   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4037.jpg)   
   
   
 
The windows on this part of the building won't be installed until after everything is painted. I still have to add trim and other details to the outside of the building, and detail the interiors.     
   
   
 ...
 


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on September 21, 2009, 11:38:07 PM
It's really coming together. You haven't missed a trick. -- Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 05, 2009, 12:23:04 PM
Some more progress...     
 
     
I added the trim and eaves detail to the underside of the roof, starting with the trim which helps to conceal the joint between the roof and the top of the walls. I used the slick peel-off backing from a sticker as a spacer when gluing the trim pieces to the roof:   
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4049.jpg)   
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4052.jpg)     
   
   
   
Then I added pieces representing the ends of the rafters, supporting the eaves:     
       
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4067.jpg)       
   
   
   
I built up one side of the roof where it will abut the next building. It's hard to tell from the photos but this new section of the roof is high at the front, so the water will run off to the rear:     
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4063.jpg)   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4057.jpg)   
   
     
     
To prevent rain from getting into the building where the roof meets the "false front", I made a sort of internal rain gutter, using an "H" column. Small holes at the top of the wall on each side let the moisture flow out:   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4073.jpg)   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4074.jpg)   
   
     
   
Next I added the trim along the corners of the building, and the fancy stuff at the top of the "false front". The brackets at the top were carved out of .125" x .250" styrene rods, using a Dremel with a cutting wheel and also a small drill bit:   
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4066.jpg)   
   
       
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4062.jpg)   
   
     
     
The posts in front of the building were made from square styrene rod, with short segments of square brass tube added:   
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4080.jpg)     
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4077.jpg)     
     


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on October 05, 2009, 12:43:10 PM
It's too bad all that nice work will be subject to the ravages of nature. -- Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 05, 2009, 12:47:07 PM
After the trim was finished, I painted the entire building with a coat of white primer, inside and out. Next I painted the interior of the second level with a pale yellowish color, and brushed some dark green and brown paint onto the floor. It's not perfect but it doesn't have to be. Curtains and furnishings will hide the flaws:
     
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4097.jpg)     
   
     
     
The lower level of the building is where most of the interior detail will be. The floor was painted separately, then glued into place. For now, I decided to keep the interior white with a tan wainscot. The wainscot was made from grooved siding with a half-rod trim at the top, and a rectangular strip along the bottom. The wainscot was painted, then glued into place. I also built a false door and glued it to the rear interior wall. This will give the viewer the impression that there is more to this tiny structure than meets the eye. The rear of the building is hidden so it's easy to pull off the deception:
   
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4085.jpg)     
     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4089.jpg)     
     
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4093.jpg)     
     

       
     
At this point I discovered a small mistake... I had forgotten to add the vertical mullions to the window on the front door. Putting them in at this stage of the project was a pain, but I got it done:     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4091.jpg)     
       
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4094.jpg)     
      ...
     
     
The rest of the interior detail will be added after the exterior painting has been finished.
 
 


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 05, 2009, 01:13:05 PM
Painting the exterior....
     
   
To prevent spattering the interior, I put some paper behind the windows. This must be done gently on the first floor of the building, to prevent damaging the window mullions.     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4106.jpg)     
      ...
     
     ...
The building will be painted to represent an old structure that has weathered, peeled paint. So the first step is to give it an undercoat resembling weathered wood. I use thin washes of craft acrylics, mostly Apple Barrel brand and also Michael's "house" brand. Be sure to buy the flat version, not the gloss. As you can see from the first photo, I like to build up the color a little at a time, allowing each coat to dry before adding more:   
     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4101.jpg)     
      ...

 (http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4102.jpg)     
      ...
     
The first couple of coats are done using "Nutmeg Brown". I also added a few streaks of "King's Gold" (yellow). Then I applied some "Espresso", a darker brown, and later some mixes of Espresso, "pewter gray" and black.  I didn't go into too much detail because most of this "wood" effect will be covered with the "peeling" paint.       
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4120.jpg)     
     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4123.jpg)     
      ...

 (http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4114.jpg)     
      ...

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4119.jpg)     
      ...
   
       


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on October 05, 2009, 10:25:43 PM
Most satisfactory. -- Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on October 06, 2009, 02:34:31 AM
Hey Ray,

you are so darn consistant...

I am very impressed with the consistancy in youre realistic wood look you achieve on the material for each of those buildings when there is a good amount time in between that phase...

Is this due to using the same stock on all of the structures... or do you like use a self proven recipie during the coloring?

heh  ;) probably both (just curious)
 
Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 06, 2009, 11:36:37 AM
Both... Using the same brand of paint insures that the basic colors are consistent. Then using the same application process helps keep the end result consistent. I'm still working on that.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 09, 2009, 11:03:07 AM
Another progress update...     
   
   
With the "wood" underlayer finished, it was time to add the "peeled paint" effect. I combine two methods... one uses a masking liquid to create small blotches where paint has flaked off. I've tried rubber cement in the past, but found it difficult to work with. Last time I tried Microscale's "Micro Mask". This was easier to use than the rubber cement but still not great. It sometimes required scrubbing the piece to remove all the tiny blobs of mask; and the blue dye in the mask has a tendency to stain my acrylic paints. I wanted something that would work the same way but was colorless and easy to remove.     
      ....   
   
I soon came up with a "sweet solution": Wilton's "Sparkle Gel", available from Michael's. It's a sugary cake decorating gel normally used to write or draw on pastries. It dries to a rubbery texture and washes off easily with water.    .  .
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4126.jpg)     
      ...
   
     
I squeezed some gel onto a paper plate, then used a coarse brush from Home Depot to dab small blotches of gel onto the model and let it dry. Here's a shot of how it looks on the model:     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4134.jpg)     
      ...
   
     
The second technique I use for peeling paint is to brush on some Testor's Enamel Thinner right before applying the color coat. The water-based acrylic paint doesn't mix with the thinner. As a result, the paint streaks and follows the scribed "wood grain", creating a very realistic worn and aged appearance. I found it works best to brush the paint on in the direction of the grain wherever possible.     
     
    . . .
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4140.jpg)     
      ...
   
     
Let the paint dry thoroughly, then wash off the gel. It helps to rub your hand over it under running water. You can also use a soft paint brush to gently dislodge bits of gel and paint from finer areas of the model.     
     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4153.jpg)     
      ...
   
 
 More to come... 
     
     


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 09, 2009, 01:10:06 PM
Here's how the storefront looked after applying the peeled paint, and before painting the trim or doing any touchup:     
   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4155.jpg)     
      ...
   
     
It was ok but for some reason it just didn't quite look right to me. It seemed like the peeled paint was too blotchy, and too "busy" looking. So I decided to tone it down a bit by adding a wash of white paint to most of the store front. I figured these areas were most accessible and the most likely to be repainted...   
   
After doing that, I touched up the places where I'd gotten white paint on the trim. Then I used the cake decorating gel to mask off the white areas around the edges of the trim. I had to thin the gel a little with water to do that, and applied it with a fine brush.
 
Once the gel had dried, I started painting the trim. I decided to use only the enamel thinner technique to achieve the weather paint effect on the trim. So I wet the trim with Testor's enamel thinner and brushed on the trim color (Apple Barrel's "Tapestry Wine"). This worked out well. When the paint had thoroughly dried, I washed off the gel mask. Here's how the model looks now:   
     
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4162.jpg)     
      ...
     
     
I can see in these photos that there's still a few places that need touching up...   
     
       
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4161.jpg)     
      ...
       
     
Eventually I plan to add a worn, faded sign across the false front... 
   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4172.jpg)     
      ...
   
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4176.jpg)     
      . . . .
     
   
Here's how it looks next to the other buildings...     
     
   
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4177.jpg)                   
       .    .     . 
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4178.jpg)   
     
    .     .    . 
 
 
Next I need to do some more touch up, and I'm still debating whether or not I like the amount of peeled paint. Also, seeing these buildings together, I'm starting to be displeased with the color of the "wood" on the rock shop. Seems like it needs to be muted a little.   
     
 Anyway, I also need finish building, painting and installing the windows on the second level. I also need to add doorknobs to the doors, glaze the windows, add roofing, and other small exterior details; and then do the interior.
 
 
 


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: finescalerr on October 09, 2009, 01:23:35 PM
You are correct, Ray. It still needs a little work but you have a good eye and you'll get it right. Maybe take a couple of days off and come back to it with a fresh eye.

The overall issue seems to be overstatement, at least looking at the structure from a distance. Seems the effect should be more subtle and the areas of peeling paint more localized and, generally, smaller.

I still find it amazing that you can build and paint models to that level of detail ... yet leave them outdoors.

Russ


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 12, 2009, 11:03:17 PM
Mike, I'll probably use the .030" polycarbonate from Caboose Hobbies. I've been told it should hold up well outdoors. I used it on the rock shop and have had no problems so far. I'm using Testor's "Clear Parts Cement" to glue in the poly. This cement is flexible and can be easily cut out in case I ever have to replace the poly.


Correction: The polycarbonate sheets I bought came from ColoradoModels.com, and is thinner than .030". I think it's .010". Also, there are other places that have it. A google search for .010" Lexan will turn up several good sources.





Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ken Hamilton on October 13, 2009, 04:54:32 AM
Oh, wow......I LOVE all that delicate "wood"work in the new building, Ray.
Very nice indeed.  Fantastic job!!


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: TRAINS1941 on October 13, 2009, 06:46:42 AM
Real nice wood working and detail.  The weathering is coming along just fine with a little more touch-up it will be right there.  And to think this stays outside amazing.

Jerry


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 22, 2009, 01:04:28 AM
Here's what I've done since the last update...

Added the roofing material. I ran some .001" thick brass shim stock through a paper crimper. The corrugated sheets were then cut to fit the various areas of the roof. Then the corrugated panels were sprayed with Rustoleum's "Cold Galvanizing Compound", basically an acrylic-based zinc paint.

The sheet metal was glued to the roof using Liquid Nails. I started with some uncorrugated strips in the trough area of the roof, then applied the corrugated panels:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4183.jpg)


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4187.jpg)


The roof looked good, but too new. I wanted to simulate the appearance of cheap, low-grade galvanized metal which has become aged and rusty. My first attempt was to use a chemical approach. I brushed on a thin coat of Sophisticated Finishes "Iron Metallic Surfacer". When that dried, it was treated with their "Rust Antiquing Solution". Unfortunately this didn't work out as I had hoped. The iron coat was too thin to produce sufficient rust, and the rusting solution blackened the zinc.

I tried a couple more coats and got a good rust affect, but it looked like it had never been galvanized. So I gave up on the chemicals and did it the old fashioned way -- I painted it. It's not perfect, but it'll do:


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4211.jpg)


As discussed previously, I was unsatisfied with the appearance of the wood showing through the peeled paint on the building. So I went over most of it with a thin wash of white, which helped a lot. I used more white on the front of the building, and less on the side, leaving some areas there unmodified.

Next I installed .010" thick Lexan "glass" in the storefront windows. This was a pain. In the future I will try to construct such storefronts so that the window frames can be built up separately and installed after receiving the glass.

I also finished and installed the upstairs windows. I had considered leaving them off until after I'd detailed the interior, but I didn't want to wait that long.

I added doorknobs to the doors, and a small "PRIVATE" sign on the door leading upstairs. I built up a "wood" frame for the sign over the storefront, and printed up a vinyl sign for it. Here are a few shots of the building, alone and in position on the layout:

(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4214a.jpg)


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4217a.jpg)


(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4221a.jpg)


Although it looks fairly complete, the building is still a long way from being finished. I still have to get decals made for some additional signs. I also need to add minor exterior details such as light fixtures, plumbing/electrical hardware, smokejacks, etc. And of course I need to create and install all the interior details, which will be a pretty big chore.






Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on October 22, 2009, 01:18:56 AM
Them windows look pretty good to me Ray...

What did you end up doing to get them all in?

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 22, 2009, 06:55:06 PM
Thanks Mike. I used a fine paintbrush to apply Testor's "Clear Parts Cement" along the inside edges of the window frames. I also added a little bit along the outer edges of the "glass", to ensure a good seal. Then I used tweezers to hold the "glass" and maneuver it into place. This was a little tricky because the windows are so tall, and even the smallest sideways movement tended to smudge a little glue over onto the exposed areas of glass.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 22, 2009, 11:02:55 PM
Here are a couple closeup photos I shot this afternoon...   Nothing special but I liked how they looked:       
     .   
 
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4228b.jpg)     
       .
     
(http://www.raydunakin.com/IRRWebfiles/Building3/wIMG_4236b.jpg)     .   
       .   
     
     
 


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on October 22, 2009, 11:16:43 PM
Hey Ray,

It's looking GOOD!

I like the first photo... with the angle on the space between the buildings. Nice shot

I like your eye candy... very inspiring  ;D

Mike


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: jacq01 on October 23, 2009, 01:52:09 PM

  Ray,

  very convincing.... good photography too.  NO REFLECTIONS  ;D ;D

  Jacq


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 23, 2009, 05:53:57 PM
Thanks. I'm working on improving my photography. In this case I had to shoot those pics pretty quick before losing what little sun there was on the buildings. This time of year the sunlight only reaches them for a short time, and only from behind. Soon they'll get no sun at all, which makes the winter season a very frustrating time for photos.

Speaking of photography, I made a really good reflector several months ago, by gluing some crinkled aluminum foil to a large sheet of foam core. But so far I still haven't been able to use it... there's usually no one at hand who can hold it for me, and no way to securely mount it where I need it.





Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 26, 2009, 09:07:35 PM
No new pics, but here's a brief update...

I built up some electric meters, smoke jacks and a few other small exterior details. Since I'll need these for many of my buildings I decided to mold them so I can cast duplicates. Then I discovered that my silicone mold compound has turned to rubber in the jar. Doh!  I hate the short shelf-life of that stuff.

A while back someone posted pics here of some bottles they turned from acrylic rod. My first attempt at this several months ago failed, but those pics and the info supplied inspired me to try again. Success! I've managed to make a half dozen or so already, just between other projects. Also, I remembered reading the posts in another forum from the Polish aircraft modeler, who mentioned that he used toothpaste to polish parts. So I used that to smooth the bottle after shaping them. Turned out real nice.

Now I'm working on a swamp cooler (old fashioned evaporative cooler that predates modern air-conditioning). Maybe I'll mold that too, when my shipment of mold compound gets here.  Lots of old desert buildings used swamp coolers.

Last night I found out that three of the lights inside my rock shop had burned out prematurely, so I'm replacing those and trying figure out how to prevent it happening again.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: RoughboyModelworks on October 26, 2009, 09:21:08 PM
Lots of old desert buildings used swamp coolers.

Not just in the desert Ray... swamp coolers are still plentiful throughout the central valley here. You can still buy them here at Home Depot. They tend to be most prevalent in the older and/or less affluent neighborhoods as they are generally less expensive than air conditioners. I tried a small one once in my garage in an attempt to cool it during the summer. Didn't work worth a damn except it made everything damp, machines were corroding, it was a mess... really was like a swamp in there. Got rid of it and replaced it with a portable AC unit which worked like a charm and was worth every penny of the cost.

Paul


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: marc_reusser on October 26, 2009, 10:19:49 PM
Ray,

Thise close-up photos are awsome....looks like the real 1:1 stuff I have seen.

Re. The lights.....have you considered LED's...they should have a long lifespan.

M


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 26, 2009, 10:48:49 PM
I'd love to be able to use LEDs, but there are too many obstacles. First is size -- they're a LOT bigger than a grain of rice bulb. Then there's the leads -- bulbs have of a pair of thin, closely spaced wires that can be run through a narrow brass tube or otherwise disguised/hidden.  Can't do that with an LED, which has those thick, widely spaced metal prongs.

The wiring is more complicated too, and I haven't a clue as to what kind of resistors you're supposed to use or how to use them.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: marc_reusser on October 27, 2009, 01:52:01 AM
I think we're talking two different types/brands of LED.....the ones that I have seen (in person) are around 1mm in size, and have two hair-thin wire leads.....come in multiple colors, and are extremely bright. Unfortunately I can't recall the name of the mfr at the moment.


M


Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 27, 2009, 02:12:37 AM
Interesting. I've never seen LEDs that small.



Title: Re: Designing my next building
Post by: MrBrownstone on October 27, 2009, 11:04:45 AM
Hey Ray,

I think the Radio Shack Catalog has the 1.5mm led's in it.. I know I have seen them that small as well

they put them on computer main boards too... and they are smaller than 1mm (so I know they make them that small and smaller even)


Then there is always fiber optic's (you would have to polish the ends more round to produce a broader light... but could be done)
or even put the fiber end into the grain of rice bulb. (lighted bulb but with fiber light source)
single light source for many lights

Mike