Westlake Publishing Forums

General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: Dirky on April 17, 2009, 01:55:59 PM



Title: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on April 17, 2009, 01:55:59 PM
Hello,

want to share my project with some of you experts to see if I'm doing OK? Only re-started last year with model railroad and want to get it right the first time now!

thanks,

Dirky

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/metselwerk.jpg)

scale HO, all stones carved by hand....


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: marc_reusser on April 17, 2009, 03:33:53 PM
Welcome to the forum.

Gesneden met de hand! :o U bent gek! :-\ ;) ;D

It looks beautiful, but is a bit hard to see the detail, Any chance you could post some closeup photos.

Thanks.

Marc


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: lab-dad on April 18, 2009, 07:23:44 AM
hand carved?.......
HO?.......................
:o :o :o :o :o :o :o

Like Marc said, more pics!!!!!!!!!
-Marty


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: TRAINS1941 on April 18, 2009, 09:00:24 AM
Yes more pictures but from here it looks like you did a fine job.

Jerry


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on April 18, 2009, 02:33:00 PM
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/raam2.jpg)

Can't do any better - with the camera I mean... The window is also hand made!.

thx for the nice comments!

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: RoughboyModelworks on April 18, 2009, 04:22:42 PM
Nicely done. With that level of commitment to your craft you'll fit in well here.

Paul


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: marc_reusser on April 19, 2009, 01:34:43 AM
I agree with Paul.

I assume the base casting was plaster. What did you do your carving with, and how doid you dilineate all your brick courses and patterns?

Is there a prototype of this station?

Marc


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: jacq01 on April 19, 2009, 02:29:35 AM

 
Quote
Is there a prototype of this station?
   :o :o

   correct: Original building !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;) ;)

    Jacq


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: lab-dad on April 19, 2009, 06:50:42 AM
make molds!
I could use a few of these walls (in O scale though) ???
-Marty


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on April 19, 2009, 02:37:23 PM


Thx once more for the compliments...

To make a long story short:
The original building was demolished some 8 years ago but I am fortunate that some lookalikes are still excisting (there must have been some 15 identical railway stations). With all the input I could get I managed to derive a 3D model (using Autodesk Inventor) that comes close to the 1905 version.
I wanted to try out new techniques and also wanted to prove myself that HO is still large enough to get accurate details...  ???
The building is made with PVC-foam plate (I do not know the correct English word for this but Comacel, Vikupor, Forex are some typical brandnames). The horizontal joints (correct word?) of the brick wall have been cut with a sharp knife at 0.9mm intervals before cutting anything to size. After glueing all frames to the basic wall I started carving the vertical joints using a mini (0.8mm) chisel made from an old jewelers screwdriver. I just had to stick to the traditional pattern, the so called "Vlaams Verband" or translated, something like the Flemish brick pattern.... Later I spray-painted brick color, made it dirty and rubbed in some yellowish white paint for the joints...

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: chester on April 19, 2009, 06:26:43 PM
That must have been tremendously time consuming. Great results. Look forward to more progress and thanks for sharing.


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on April 20, 2009, 02:41:53 AM
Time consuming? Yes and No!
Let’s say this one was indeed time consuming but I had to try out things over and over again. Making some better tooling also took time. And most important, finding the right sequence of doing things…
I should be able now to put 4 walls together in one day.

The model railroad project I plan will show Nederbrakel back in the early 20-ties. Houses therefore have to look as original as possible and there is nothing out there (at least that I know of) regarding plastic or plaster wall panels that allow accurate house building… Next struggle will be the roof tiles… Thinking of making individual tiles  :-\

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on April 20, 2009, 04:50:53 AM
PICTURE IS LOST - WILL GET BACK TO THIS LATER, sorry

something for the same project... a piece of fence of which I will need a few meters, and a gate with the smallest hinges I ever made... and they work  :)

I want to paint all this to give it the look of weathered wood. Any tips or hints on how to do this please?

thx

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: lab-dad on April 20, 2009, 06:50:24 AM
The fence looks like wood and styrene, if it is have a look at the painting I did in my "Chivers" post.
I'm sure Marc can provide some much better suggestions too.
-Marty

BTW your brick work is impressive as heck! (applause)

-Marty


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: marc_reusser on April 20, 2009, 02:11:03 PM
Dirky,

Thanks for the explanation, and the photo. Very nice work on the "rough-cast" plaster wall surface also...a very good and realistic representation of this finish. I am assuming this is for a different structure. How did you achieve it? Paint finish over sand?

First thing I noticed looking at your fence was the hinges....like I said...crazy. ;) The initial concern I have re. weathering and ainting the fence is that it is already assembled. ...I am concerened about the glue loosening if you use to many water based washes, and the possibility of paint pudelling in the areas between and around the pickets. I think the best approach technique here might be Marcel Ackels approach to his wood fence...though probably more weathered than you want (you can adapt it to scale and amount of weathering desired), the materials are readily at hand in Europe, and you probably already own them. The other method I would suggest is Chucks...but that is more involded for such a small scale

Here is a thread to one approach to this by Marcel on modellboard.de:
http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=20135.0 (http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=20135.0)

This thread there is a complete structure and involves various approaches to wood...but in particular the door on this page:
http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=22777.45 (http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=22777.45)

Here some more unpainted wood:
http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=26352.0 (http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=26352.0)


Hope this helps.


Marc



Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on April 20, 2009, 02:54:59 PM
Thanks once more for all the nice comments!

The plaster surface is for the same building. I wasn't there back in 1880 to find out why but most of these lookalike railway station buildings were plastered on the "road-side" and brick on the "railway-track-side". The rough surface was done with a rotating tool that threw little stones in the wet cement. I used grade 60 sandpaper to imitate that plaster.
Thanks for the German links re weathering fences. Right, I should have weathered before assembly. Anyway, I'll try to do what's possible and if not satisfactory I'll use these pcs for something else and commence all over the right way.
btw I did not use styrene but hard paper - like business cards - soaked with super glue to make it strong.
Windows are blister-package plastic foil. The woodwork imitation is made using paper tape.

I enjoy making all the little stuff very much but if I had more available space, the 0 scale would please me more. Glad I found this forum! you guys do amazing things!!! And that is great help!

thx

Dirk


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 26, 2009, 02:29:24 PM
That station looks great so far! Very nice work, especially carving all those bricks.



Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Frederic Testard on April 26, 2009, 03:15:18 PM
Your walls and fences are really impressive, Dirky. I've been thinking for years to build an old french farm using this PVC-foam, and have always found some american-based model to do first. The results are excellent, and provide an incentive to try my hand on such a build.
Thank you for the links, Marc.


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on May 27, 2009, 03:28:44 AM
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/deur005.jpg)

Finally one door...


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Ken Hamilton on May 28, 2009, 01:37:39 PM
Time invested in making the proper carving tools was well spent, Dirky. 
Great job!  That wall is superb.
(http://bestsmileys.com/cheering/7.gif)(http://bestsmileys.com/cheering/7.gif)(http://bestsmileys.com/cheering/7.gif)


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on September 12, 2009, 02:46:39 PM
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/cafe%20LEON/volledigegevel.jpg)

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/cafe%20LEON/cafeLeondeel4.jpg)

Did another one...

scale H0 is rather small so adding more detail is almost impossible. But I'm satisfied. Looking at it without magnifying glasses gives a satisfactory result.

Up to the next one...


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: jacq01 on September 12, 2009, 03:29:18 PM
  Dirk,

  this is how I remember belgian facades  when staying in Flanders.  Very well balanced details, maybe the nail holes too heavy, with good coloring
  I understood this is all part of a modular layout, do you have plans to go to exhibitions ?

  Jacq

  PS I noticed most pictures are deleted, I hope you still have them and are able to repost them.


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on September 13, 2009, 02:49:34 PM
Too early Jacq to know where I'm going... Sure hope to present my Nederbrakel Project one day next to yours!
Next to building facades now, I try out all kinds of techniques and re-organise my workshop for this new old hobby! Let's say, out of 10 hours only 10 minutes add material to the project to come! This will change over time (I hope)!

Regarding the nail holes I can only say that indeed they are too big but with the eye one can hardly see them. Macro-pictures show too many details.

Reposted some pictures... will do more later!

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on September 16, 2009, 05:52:15 AM
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/gevekevollediggeprikt.jpg)

the next one started... carved brick fassade


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: finescalerr on November 02, 2009, 02:26:35 AM
You appear to be a master of all media. -- Russ


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on November 02, 2009, 03:02:10 PM
thanks for the compliment Russ...

I restarted building models only about a year ago after some 30 years of silence.  Forums like this one here are pushing me to the limit to explore all branches in today's modelling. In the H0 world I really dislike the mentality of big, much and expensive which mostly results in poor quality scenery.

In this past year I really did not finish a single piece but jump from one technique to another to try out everything I want to see on my future track. I do hope to get some stuff rolling by the end of next year... and at a quality that fits in this forum!

So thanks to everyone for showing  all the masterpieces and sharing the techniques!


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: MrBrownstone on November 02, 2009, 03:12:52 PM
I could not have said it better myself...

Quote: Dirky : "Forums like this one here are pushing me to the limit to explore all branches in today's modelling".

If your looking for Idea's, Technique's, concept's and honest views and comments in one place "YOU HAVE FOUND IT"

Thanks for sharing your works with Us.

Mike


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on November 15, 2009, 03:17:40 PM
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Type%2011/type11parts22001.jpg)

Had to spray a primer to better see the spots that need special attention. Experimented to add the rivet-rows on the bottom of the tanks and the cabine but I'm not pleased with the results. With the eye it's not that bad but on the macro-shots... hmmm!
Anyone an idea how to simulate strips with rivets? Only 0.8mm wide, rivetspacing something like 0.6mm, heads 0,25... strip not thicker than 0.2mm.

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Type%2011/TypeHLV11-sporeninBelgi-1.jpg)

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Type%2011/TypeHLV11-sporeninBelgi-1a.jpg)
the real thing...

thanks,

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: finescalerr on November 16, 2009, 02:39:11 AM
Are you aware of the resin rivets you can apply as a decal? Maybe there are some of the right size for your model. -- Russ


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on November 16, 2009, 02:55:00 AM
No, I was not aware... ???

Found a nearby store in the meantime that sells Archer transfers... gonna take a look there.

thanks!

Dirky


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on March 25, 2010, 03:13:33 PM
Hi again,
been doing something else for the last few months but finally picked up where I left and did some scenery tests:

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20100325001.jpg)

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20100321005.jpg)

roof tiles are just a preliminary test (copying a flemish type of tile) but they look fine from a normal viewing distance. As a result of this test I start to believe that I can actually make a tool to speed up roof tiling!


Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on May 26, 2010, 04:47:40 AM


some P87 trackwork:

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20100511010.jpg)


thanks for watching



Title: Re: Belgian Project
Post by: Dirky on May 26, 2010, 07:42:37 AM
LOST THIS PICTURE - WILL POST NEW ONE LATER

the "type 11" loc is getting better too:

the chassis is ready to accept the wheels. These are transformed from Romford tender wheels.


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on June 15, 2010, 02:15:51 PM
Jumped to another item on the layout. A working steamcrane should be loading open wagons. The crane works OK in manual mode - pulling the strings - and later RC servo's should do the job.

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20100615002.jpg)
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20100617004.jpg)

painted and partially rusted/weathered the main structure before assembly.


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Ray Dunakin on June 15, 2010, 09:03:32 PM
Holy guacamole! That steam shovel is looking good! Amazing work for such a small scale.


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: finescalerr on June 16, 2010, 01:58:03 AM
What he said. -- Russ


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Malachi Constant on June 17, 2010, 03:10:05 PM
Wow!  Nice as a static model, but getting it to work is impressive ... looking forward to more ... nice work!

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 17, 2010, 10:07:49 AM
Due to some changes in my personal life, this project has been set aside for a while.

I'm in the process of placing back the pictures and will later add some new updates...


sorry for this inconvenience!


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 17, 2010, 10:23:07 AM
Did a restart on the project by building the house on the right hand side (this picture is anno 2010):
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/modelbouw004.jpg)
on the right the facade is made using PVC sheeting. Made a plaster copy but that showed to many airbubbles. Instead of throwing it away I used it as a basis to practice some new (to me) techniques.
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101208003b.jpg)
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101208003.jpg)
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101208004.jpg)

and did some cobblestone tests...
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101217b001.jpg)

thanks for watching (again)


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: BKLN on December 17, 2010, 11:16:51 AM
Awesome!
Unfortunately, most of your other pictures have been removed.


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 17, 2010, 01:48:27 PM
A short recap of the story:

The “Nederbrakel Anno 1920” model railroad project will show a H0 scaled copy of the railway station environment of the town where I live, as it could have been some 90 years ago. It will be a traveling display. At least that’s what I hope it will be!
Primary historical sources for this are a bunch of old postcards and the plan from the railway company anno 1905. Wherever I can, I measure things that still are present today.

Building this 100% to scale would ask for a 30 meter table and that is something I do not have room for. Compressing reality is the only solution. This starts already when building the houses. All the buildings will be correct regarding height but some will be made 5 to 10 % less wide.

Practically it should result in an L-shape display that uses 8m x 1m for the historical “correct” environment, the other leg of the L will be 4m x 1m and will display a fake industrial area that will feature buildings that are lookalikes of real stuff from other postcards. That area should be the fun part later as it will have at least the working steam bagger and probably more machinery that can be operated by the visitors themselves.

I also aim to keep it cheap and as you will see that results in some strange techniques and dedicated tooling. But “strange” is something this forum is used to, isn’t it?

Hope you all will enjoy this new start!

in the meantime, the picture links have been repaired where possible. Unfortunately I had to delete some links...


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: jacq01 on December 17, 2010, 02:29:17 PM
 Hallo Dirk,

 geweldig weer eens wat van je werk te zien.......

 Good to see some progres / news from your project.  The walls look great, nice texture. I have one comment, the boarded up window planks are in my opinion too large and the grain too coarse. It is in dissonance with your other finescale work.

 Jacq


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 17, 2010, 03:21:36 PM
Nice to hear you too again Jacq (and of course all the others) and glad to be back... I missed some of the stuff that is being shown on this brilliant forum!

fortunately, this ruined facade is not meant to be on the display.
Believe it or not, the planks have their own story: Seven months ago I had to have my dogs put to sleep with an injection. They were both too old and too sick. We decided not to have anymore dogs in the future and while tearing down their dogs house I noticed on the wood some fantastic beautiful colored moss. The planks had a worn color one can not copy...
On the picture of the base of the crane (see former messages) you can see the planks have a nice greenish/grey color. For the boarded window I used the same planks but somehow the grain is showing the coarse structure more than on the crane's base. Perhaps the natural drying process causes this...

To make smaller planks I will need other tooling. The little disk saw I have is OK for cutting small things but reducing the thickness has to be done by hand with a sharp blade for the time being.

Not sure I will work further on this ruined house but if it will be on the display I'll make sure to correct the boarded window planks...


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 17, 2010, 03:58:17 PM
Want to talk a little about making cobble stone streets and market squares…

In my search for cobble stone information I came across many different pictures. Some street look as if all stones have been carefully selected, others look quite different!
The worse I came across:

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/kasseien.jpg)

I had to find some kind of “average” that I can use for many situations. The sheet of PVC foam that is in preparation now features cobble stone that could have been 20cm long, ranging from 10 to 20cm wide. This is the tool I use:

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101217b005.jpg)

Later I will make a silicone mold and copy the pattern in plaster. Those copies can be altered individually and playing with the amount of joint fillers might result in many different views.

Pressing the meccano wheel in the foam is a tough job. The whole process is time-consuming too…


Any hints on different approaches regarding the cobble stone subject?

thanks


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: DaKra on December 17, 2010, 07:03:14 PM
Hi Dirky

Beautiful work so far!   I have not seen this thread before, I'm sorry I did not see the now missing photos.

On cobblestones, we had an interesting discussion here about using high tech to make them.   

http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1039.45

HOWEVER there is a really interesting low tech way to make these, and you will find it well illustrated in a Japanese TV show!   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjgw_QD15QE&feature=related

This excellent model maker starts showing this around the 4:30 point.  Later he shows how he makes his 1/48 structures, and balcony railings and hanging laundry etc.  By the way, this is a GREAT series of videos and there are dozens of them on Youtube! 


Dave


Title: Re: Belgian Project - Proto 87 standards
Post by: Dirky on December 18, 2010, 04:29:57 AM
Thanks for the links Dave…

Unfortunately it’s not the cobble stone I want to replicate. The high tech is too regular regarding the sizes of the stones. At least to replicate a 1920’s scene that is…
The Japanese guy is really good at lots of things but my guess is he never has seen a Flemish cobble stone street in his life. The bonding to start with is complete against all logic. But the idea is OK.
The place where I live is called “zegelsem” and every year we have “the Zegelsem Cobble Stone Fest”. Many street are cobble stone streets and that’s the pattern I want to get on my display. Will post some Zegelsem pictures later.


Back to the buildings…

Last night I managed to finish a side wall prototype that will be used for making a silicone mold. I need at least 7 blank side walls. All bricks measure 2.4 x 0.80mm and are hand carved using PVC foam sheeting. Up to now I’ve not seen anything H0 scale that comes closer to the real thing so hand-carving seems to be the only solution.

(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101218a006.jpg)
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101218a008.jpg)

Also made one more window to see if this masking tape technique needs improvement. Looking at the building from normal viewing distance gives a fine result. It is definitely a not freshly painted window...
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101218b030.jpg)

Thanks for watching and
Greetings from the Flemish Ardennes…
(http://i836.photobucket.com/albums/zz286/Dirky/Nederbrakel%20station/20101218a014.jpg)