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General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: 1-32 on April 22, 2019, 07:15:24 PM



Title: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 22, 2019, 07:15:24 PM
Hi, this is a new topic I will park it here to see what happens.
I made mention in my last post in Dirty Dog that one of my barges was photographed by a third person using an SLR, I was impressed with the results.The detail that was always there was bought to life in a deep 3d form not perfect but much better than my usual methods.
do I go out and buy an SLR either new or used with an appropriate lens plus a cheap light box with better lighting just for 3D items. I am on a fixed income so I always look for the best without spending a lot say the equivalent of a new smartphone say 600 Australian dollars.
My cell phone is an old Samsung great I never buy new as the last one that was expensive I dropped into the sea-stuffed.
The camera that I usually use is a Panasonic -Lumix with a Leica lens. great travel camera fits into your pocket, important, has a macro setting and other features that I am not quite sure of.all of my photos are taken with it.
question do I stick with what I have or do I go out and get a lens plus SLR that I will use just for home use.
(https://images40.fotki.com/v719/photos/3/1816483/16118448/292666665_446345607129333760_o-vi.jpg)
this has been taken by a third party using the lights from my model South Creek.
(https://images14.fotki.com/v1315/photos/3/1816483/16118448/62666678_9088675149418332160_o-vi.jpg).
again by a third party.
(https://images20.fotki.com/v682/photos/3/1816483/16118448/P1050034-vi.jpg?1555976557).
this shot is from my Lumix not bad but i want the lettering to be more 3 d.
(https://images43.fotki.com/v1384/photos/3/1816483/16118448/P1040950-vi.jpg).
again using my Lumix.
so i will be interested in any opinions-cheers.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 22, 2019, 09:45:04 PM
Let's start by looking at the attached photo of a 1:32n3 Shay. You may recall seeing it a couple of years ago when Havard had a question about emulating the effectiveness of some early digicams. I shot the image with an iPhone 7+. It consists of seven separate exposures, each with a different focal point. A $50 program called Affinity Photo has a command that blends all the shots into a single photo where everything is in focus, from front to back.

What that means is that Carlo can use his iPhone 6 and Kim can use his Panasonic-Lumix and get essentially the same results as I did. I used two high intensity desk lamps to light the model at night. I could have obtained the same results had I shot the model outside in sunlight or even outside in the shade or on a cloudy day. (I spent a long time erasing the ugly background and replaced it with a gradient.)

No matter where or how you shoot the photo, you MUST use a tripod and you must have a lot of light. The more light, the better the depth-of-field.

I'm not sure how much detail you guys want me to go into about how to shoot macro photos. I will only say one thing: If you want good results, you can't take snapshots. You have to go through certain steps and you can't take shortcuts.

Finally, I'd spend the $50 U.S. dollars on Affinity Photo if you're serious about getting good results. For what you want to use it for, it's as good as Photoshop (actually better than CS6 when it comes to depth-of-field photo stacking) and the price is far less than a new camera. Another major benefit is that you can easily create a 230kb jpeg for our lousy forum software. I knocked down a 30 mb tiff image for posting here and it took only 30 seconds with no need to do it twice!

Let me know if any of you wants more info about how to use your specific cameras.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: peterh on April 22, 2019, 10:19:57 PM
Use a photo editor and apply sharpening and clarity. These make a photo look more 3D. Clarity is like sharpening but applies over a bigger area and is milder.

Iíd assume your third party applied these as a matter of course.

Iíve done that here, plus lightened the shadows to bring out detail around the wheels. It would look much better with a higher resolution original and a curved bit of white card under and behind it to remove the clutter. Itís easy to make a lightbox, just google it.



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 23, 2019, 02:59:02 AM
great.
Russ what type of bulbs do you use in the lamps.?
cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 23, 2019, 03:02:09 AM
also, what do you mean by different focal points.?


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Lawton Maner on April 23, 2019, 12:13:33 PM
     The current issue of Railroad Model Craftsman has an article on photographing models in which the author made a simple "light box" from a large piece of heavy weight white paper to block the detritus that many times creeps into model photos.  He showed it clamped to a kitchen chair to create a curved backdrop free of visual litter.  Since most digital cameras have sensors which are more tolerant of color than film I'll bow to Russ on that topic.  However, you can carry the chair outside on a clear day, pose the subject so that the sun is over your shoulder and not have to worry about artificial light.  If you want to get fancy, a piece of white foamcore can be used to act as a reflector to provide fill light from the other side.   
     Photos to study for defects in your work do not have to come from a fancy camera.  On the otherhand a better grade of camera can produce publication quality photos and still not cost a fortune.  My current digital camera produces better photos then my bag of Minoltas did for 40+ years, but do not produce 35mm slides.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 23, 2019, 01:24:34 PM
Kim, I think the bulbs may be tungsten. They are a little under an inch long by half an inch in diameter and clear. The came with the lamps and it may be hard to find replacements. If you have halogen shop lights, they would do a good job. Don't worry about the lamps. Any lamp that you use for modeling should be fine ... as long as you have two of the same kind with matching bulbs. If you use those lamps, they must be the ONLY light source in the room. In other words, don't use a fluorescent bulb and also an incandescent bulb; don't use the overhead light along with the lamp(s); don't turn on a lamp when daylight is coming through the windows.

"Different focal points" means you put your camera on a tripod and lock it down so it doesn't move. Then manually focus on the front of the model, then an inch or two behind that, another inch or two behind that, until you have photographed the entire model, train, or scene. It is a special effect technique you are likely to use only on special occasions. I shot the Shay photo for Havard to duplicate a specific kind of image he wanted.

In 30 years of professionally photographing models I've never needed to build a light box although once or twice one might have come in handy. If you build in HO and most of your models are shorter than a foot long it might be convenient to have one but a roll of white paper and a couple of home made reflectors work about as well.

I will post the explanation of how to shoot photos I used to send to contributors next.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 23, 2019, 01:46:21 PM
MODEL PHOTOS

1. Shoot outdoors in daylight. Better for model portraits would be in full shade (such as under a covered patio) on a table. Use a seamless backdrop (a roll of white paper at least three feet long) taped to a wall or window or sliding glass door and unrolled onto the table. The backdrop MUST be paper (not cloth), white, with no folds, wrinkles, or creases. One piece of paper on the table and a second piece of paper hanging from the wall is NOT acceptable because it will create a "horizon" line.

2. ALWAYS use a tripod. No exceptions.

3. Use a 100mm lens or the equivalent zoom (e.g., 35-135, 70-200 at approximately the 100mm setting). Shoot using your camera's Manual setting and shoot at the biggest f-stop number such as f/11. If your camera goes up to f/22 or f/32, by all means choose that setting.

4. Before attaching the camera to the tripod, take it right up to the model and expose on the side of the model (from the same angle at which the camera will point). DO NOT ALLOW THE LENS TO "SEE" ANY OF THE BACKGROUND OR YOUR MODEL WILL END UP LOOKING LIKE A SHADOW. You also may expose on the palm of your hand. It will create a fairly accurate starting point but it's much lighter than a black loco. Your camera will tell you how long the exposure should be at the f/stop you chose, typically around half a second or a second. Shoot a test shot. If the model is too dark, try a longer exposure time.

5. With the camera on the tripod, get as much of the model in the viewfinder as you can while still allowing a little room around the image. Again, use a 100mm lens or the equivalent. A 35 or 50mm lens probably would be inadequate. With a fixed lens digital camera, zoom the lens between three-quarters and all the way out (telephoto).

6. Shoot from as close to a scale man's eye level as possible unless, of course, you are showing the roof or underbody.

7. Set the camera's color balance for auto. If you can shoot in RAW mode, use those files instead of JPEGs; they contain far more information and result in better photos.

8. Shoot 3/4 front, 3/4 rear (opposite side), side view and, if necessary, bottom view, top view, and details. You must have enough views for a modeler to recreate your work.

9. Do not omit or compromise on any of the above "rules" or you will lower the quality of your photos.

When I wrote the above, I was expecting to run the modeler's raw images through Photoshop myself. Unfortunately I can't always do that for you guys and that is why, if you are serious about shooting photos, I suggested investing $50 on Affinity Photo and learning its basics. If you want to take the trouble to use it, I developed some presets that might save you a lot of time. As you can see, shooting decent model photos is as fussy as building the model. Ain't no free lunch.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 23, 2019, 03:30:21 PM
Thanks all.
It is going to take me a while to get on top of it all I think everybody will be interested in these posts to help them with better presentations.but please forgive me if in the middle of the night i pull out my camera take a shot under less than perfect conditions and post to Westlake publishing.
cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Chuck Doan on April 23, 2019, 10:39:26 PM
Some more great info! Thanks!


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Bill Gill on April 24, 2019, 02:42:41 PM
Thanks, Russ. All good information.
One thing that Kim might find helpful if he wants to particularly show the texture of his weathering is to shine/reflect some light onto the model from a side or the top so the raised texture will catch the light from the direction it's coming from and cast a shadow, like the light from above seen in the photo of him holding his barge. That will take a bit of experimenting with the distance and angle of the added light to look good.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 24, 2019, 05:03:03 PM
anything to add?
(https://images46.fotki.com/v274/photos/3/1816483/16118448/45289402_7051651527626194944_o-vi.jpg).
(https://images53.fotki.com/v1495/photos/3/1816483/16118448/65289400_7991772954792820736_o-vi.jpg).
(https://images49.fotki.com/v22/photos/3/1816483/16118448/88622741_1025937974707093504_o-vi.jpg).
(https://images108.fotki.com/v360/photos/3/1816483/16118448/25289394_3784776884051509248_n-vi.jpg).
(https://images53.fotki.com/v1495/photos/3/1816483/16118448/21956211_8123625895274479616_o-vi.jpg)



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 24, 2019, 08:18:23 PM
I suggest we begin with the easiest and simplest approach, then move on to the more sophisticated stuff.

Greaseproof paper may be unnecessary unless your model drips oil. It also is unnecessary to match those bulb specs; just make sure both of your bulbs are the same. They don't have to be 6500 Kelvin because your camera's auto white balance will compensate. Also, if you can shoot outdoors the bulbs and lamps are unnecessary. I photographed many models for my books and magazines outdoors ... unless it was windy! For various reasons your background paper should be at least 3 feet wide. You can pick up a 3 foot wide roll of sketch paper at an art store for just a few dollars; if it gets dirty, rip it, toss it, and unroll more.

Bill's useful comment about shadow and contrast applies more to dioramas than individual models. Let's move on to that after you are more familiar with how to use your camera for shooting basic model photos. When you have an image you like, post it and let's go from there.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 24, 2019, 09:22:11 PM
Interesting personally I am just working through all this stuff. About 40 years ago I was taught old school photography-film speed now ISO, aperture F stop the lower the number the bigger the aperture in your lens was, big aperture low light, shutter speed again about the light and I suppose movement and lastly focus.
so to think of it in old school terms model photography with a light source would be.
ISO low
Aperture f stop would be in the middle.
Shutter speed fast.
the focus could be as Russ suggested a few taken with different f stops or correct by software.some newer cameras have a lot of focus points. not like the old days where you had to line up hairlines.
anyway.
I had forgotten all that stuff with digital a lot of this stuff is taken care of.
I think out of this discussion lighting is the most important.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 24, 2019, 09:54:26 PM
Light is the single most important part of photography. You need enough available to shoot a photo in the first place, how much or how little determines what will be in focus and whether you need your camera on a tripod, where the light comes from--and what color it is or whether it is sharp or diffuse--can make or break a photo.

For model photography, your F/stop almost always should be the biggest number your lens offers, like f/32. That will make the shutter speed slow, sometimes more than one second. That's why the tripod is so important.

Since you model in 1:32, your models are relatively large so you probably would focus on the number plate of a locomotive, or maybe the stack, and almost everything would be sharp. Don't mess around with multiple shots at different points of focus now. That is a special effect you may never need.

For what it's worth, I shoot digital in exactly the same way as I used to shoot film and you'll probably get the best results by doing that, too.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on April 24, 2019, 10:34:22 PM
ok now for the lens in your previous comments you mentioned a lens with a 100 mm focal point but also 35 -135 or 70 - 200 , are these different lenses with different focal lengths.also with these lenses is the biggest f stop the better. is this right?
I supposed I should explain why there has been such a return in interest in photography for myself.
Last weekend I attended the Australian Narrow Gauge Convention for me very hard work and not enjoyable I really don't think I will go to another. Hats off to the organizers they did a great job for basically a very selfish crowd. Australia is an amazing place but by its nature isolated and with 3 dimension display work conservative.I am a creative person as are the other members of this forum and i see the only way out for me is to be able to present my work in a convincing form thus all these questions about photography.I know that the rest of the forum and the many visitors will also benefit from this information.
cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on April 25, 2019, 01:17:55 AM
Kim, I know you are familiar with cameras but I will assume some of us know nothing. The length of a lens determines whether it is designed for wide angle shots, portraits, or long range (telephoto). Short lenses are for wide angle, long ones are basically telescopes, and mid-length lenses, like a 100mm, are usually for taking portraits. A portrait lens can range from 70mm to 135mm.

The two lenses you mention, 35-135 and 70-200, are multi purpose zoom lenses. You could shoot a model with either but, in each case, you'd probably zoom the lens about halfway out so it's close to 100mm. That's usually the lens's "sweet spot", where it is sharpest overall.

When we talk about a lens's f/stop, we're talking about how large or small the lens opening can get inside. It has little to do with its focal length. It's actually like the pupil of your eye. You open it up to let in more light and close it down to allow less light. And, just like the eye, when the pupil gets smaller, it has greater depth of field. In other words, more stuff, from front to back, is in focus.

It doesn't matter what lens you use; all have adjustable f/stops. And the big numbers, like f/22 or f/32, reduce the amount of light they let in but, in return, allow more depth of field (more stuff in focus).

The reason a portrait lens, about 100mm, is good for models is because of the perspective it offers. But a 100mm lens that only stops down to f/8 gives a shallow depth of field -- not much is in focus from front to back.

So your camera, with its zoom lens, probably has an f/stop range of between f/4 and about f/16. You would want to shoot your model with the lens zoomed most of the way out (semi-telephoto) and at the biggest f/stop number (probably f/16 or f/22). That big number means the lens opening will be as small as possible. That means less light will come through and so you'll have to use a longer exposure time. That's why a tripod is necessary: To keep the camera steady during the long exposure.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Lawton Maner on April 26, 2019, 06:58:17 AM
The first sketch is basically the same as the setup in the RMC article except the author used a kitchen chair, poster board, and a large spring clamp.  The rest is a bit more complicated then needed.  Follow Russ on light and setup to progress towards becoming as good a photographer as you are a modeler.  The editor of the former magazine Mainline Modeler recommended keeping a camera and light table setup near to his workbench to photograph models in production.  With digital cameras that idea is like having your harshest critic looking over your shoulder 24/7.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 03, 2019, 01:13:28 PM
Hi, good morning.
looking for a bit of feedback, in the last couple of days I have been fiddling around with some new photo's. the first one, the anchor is coming along, with the last one -the massed items I am wanting to find out how to get them all in focus plus any other thoughts.
cheers.
(https://images108.fotki.com/v1221/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0181-vi.jpg)
(https://images52.fotki.com/v1552/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0216-vi.jpg)


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 03, 2019, 01:51:22 PM
Kim, those photos are a noticeable improvement over the last one you posted, of the new electric loco. As for the focus on the one showing a bunch of items, two possibilities:

1.) Brighter light might help. That would force your lens opening to get smaller so you'd have better front-to-back focus. Remember, all model photos should be at the largest f/stop number your camera has, such as f/32, f/22, or f/16. You must set your camera to Aperture Priority to choose that setting.

2. Maybe you could have tried a shot where you manually focus on the figure in the center of the photo, the guy with the hat and green shirt. As long as he's not too far behind the foreground objects, and as long as your f/stop is right, maybe more things would be in focus. One way to test that would be to shoot the same basic setup outdoors in the middle of the day. Remember, most cameras need a lot of light to do their best work.

Russ



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: peterh on May 04, 2019, 03:14:59 AM
Kim, It is natural that lenses (cameras, eyes) only have objects at a certain range of distances in focus. Objects closer or further away are blurred. A lot of photographers prize this effect - itís called bokeh. For some reason, railway modellers usually donít like bokeh.

To reduce bokeh (get more objects in focus) by changing your camera settings, google how to increase bokeh and do the opposite.

To eliminate bokeh, find out about focus stacking. Russ mentioned this earlier in this thread.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 04, 2019, 03:41:04 AM
Hi all.
Here is shot with lots more lighting and the f stop set at priority a lot better.
cheers.
(https://images20.fotki.com/v682/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0239-vi.jpg).



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 04, 2019, 12:42:44 PM
Now yer talkin', Kim!

Notice the whole image "pops" more not just because of the greater depth of field but also because more light makes your colors look more vibrant. If you take a few shots with those settings they will become second nature. Once you can put together a shot like that "automatically", without giving it much thought, we can move on to other things. In the meantime you have produced a publication quality shot with consistent, even lighting and front-to-back focus.

Peter mentioned bokeh. In model or product photography that would tend be a special effect whereas, if you're photographing a person, it's standard procedure and really easy to do. Focus stacking is sort of cumbersome and necessary usually only for macro (highly magnified) photography. It is possible you'd never have to use either technique for what you generally photograph.

Russ



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 05, 2019, 03:20:31 AM
yes, I am having a bit of fun with this, thanks Russ for your very good advice. One more thing do you know the difference between sending photos as an attachment in Emails and sending them through Dropbox or similar.at the moment I am having trouble understanding Dropbox.I know a few other readers are interested also.
cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: WP Rayner on May 05, 2019, 11:06:53 AM
yes, I am having a bit of fun with this, thanks Russ for your very good advice. One more thing do you know the difference between sending photos as an attachment in Emails and sending them through Dropbox or similar.at the moment I am having trouble understanding Dropbox.I know a few other readers are interested also.
cheers

What questions do you have Kim? I use Dropbox always for transferring files to and from clients in the studio. Dropbox is very easy to use and is faster than using email, especially if you are transferring large files which most email services can't handle.

Paul


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 05, 2019, 02:25:21 PM
I use Dropbox a lot but I'll let Paul answer your question about that. I'll stick to answering your photography questions here. I will say that sometimes Dropbox can be cumbersome, especially for the recipient, but you can send much large files and thus far more photos with Dropbox. -- Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Hydrostat on May 05, 2019, 02:27:59 PM
Try wetransfer.com - no registration required. It's up to 2 GB for free.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 05, 2019, 02:55:48 PM
Hi Paul.
I have to reduce my photo files to 2 GB to Email, really to my naked eye this does not seem to have any effect?
I have been looking at Dropbox as I receive some files this way sometimes there is no problem in viewing them, but sending them is another matter. When I download the photos there are 2 boxes 1 with the photo another blank what is the blank one for. Also, do you have to make up a separate file with all the photo's that you want to send?
Can you give a general comment?
Funny how it has changed from a visual one on one communication to a more electronic visual form of communication.
Morning Volker.


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 05, 2019, 03:18:23 PM
If you want to send hi-res photos, you'll have to use Dropbox or, as Volker suggests, wetransfer.com. You should not have to lower the resolution of your photos unless it's just for casual stuff. Also, I think you meant to say your e-mail server makes you reduce attachments to 2 megabytes. If it's really gigabytes, you have a very unique and generous e-mail server!

One thing that makes sending stuff via Dropbox easier for me: Create a folder on your desktop and give it a name, like "Photos-Volker". Copy the photos you want to send into the new folder. Then click on the Dropbox icon on your taskbar (or wherever it is) to open it's little window and choose the FOLDER icon. That should open a regular computer window. Drag the new photos folder from your desktop into that new window. That puts it into Dropbox so it's ready to send and also should solve the problem of two boxes, one being blank.

From there you need to open Dropbox on the Internet and send off the new folder. Paul may know of a faster method and Volker's service might be easier yet so I'll shut up now.

Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: WP Rayner on May 05, 2019, 06:33:40 PM
Hi Paul.
I have to reduce my photo files to 2 GB to Email, really to my naked eye this does not seem to have any effect?
I have been looking at Dropbox as I receive some files this way sometimes there is no problem in viewing them, but sending them is another matter. When I download the photos there are 2 boxes 1 with the photo another blank what is the blank one for. Also, do you have to make up a separate file with all the photo's that you want to send?
Can you give a general comment?
Funny how it has changed from a visual one on one communication to a more electronic visual form of communication.
Morning Volker.
Hi Kim:

Like Russ, I don't know of any email service that can accommodate 2 GB attachments... think you must mean 2 MB which is pushing it for some services.
Dropbox really is quite simple to use. It requires that you have an account and your recipients should have accounts as well. When I joined, I chose the free account which gave me 3GB capacity. I don't believe they are as generous anymore, 1 GB may be the limit on the free account now. I've never had to upgrade which involves paying for additional capacity as, with regular housecleaning of my Dropbox folder, I'm able to work well within the 3GB.

I'm going to assume that you are essentially new to Dropbox so am going to start at the beginning. If you already know some of this I apologize. When you join, Dropbox will create two folders within your primary account folder: one that says Public and the other that says Share with: (your account name). I don't use either of these. A desktop icon link will also be created for your primary account folder. You can create additional folders within that primary folder, which I recommend, by clicking on the small icon in the notification area on your taskbar (at least on a PC), selecting the Open Dropbox.com icon, then when the window opens, select Files in the left hand column. This will show your two stock folders and in this window you can add folders, which you can identify any way you wish. You can also add folders via the desktop link, but this is the safest way. For the studio I use the client's name for this folder then add as many sub-folders within it as necessary to cover the logical progression of the project. Next you have to assign recipient access to the folder. You will notice in the Files window, there is a Member column. In this column you can specify which recipient has access to that folder, (using their Dropbox account name) in addition to yourself of course. They will automatically be granted access to any subfolders within their folder. To send a file to the recipient, all you have to do is double click on your primary folder's desktop icon to open the window, then drag and drop the file into the folder you are sharing with the intended recipient. The speed at which it uploads is solely a factor of the speed of your internet connection. Once the file is uploaded, the recipient will receive a notification in the taskbar that you have sent them a file. They then go to that folder via their Dropbox account and download the file. That's it... easy peasy. You can add as many recipient accounts as members to the folder as you wish and conversely you can also remove members so they no longer have access to the folder. By controlling folder access you can control who of your recipients has access to what. For hobby work this probably isn't a concern, but for commercial work as in my case, a client only has access to their folder, not the folders of other clients. My commercial work is all performed under Non-disclosure Agreements and this process provides enough security. If you needed to transfer sensitive or classified information, don't use Dropbox.

You mentioned when you've downloaded in the past you receive two folders, one blank. I've never experienced this so have no insight into what that's about.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Cheers,
Paul



Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 06, 2019, 04:32:17 PM
Hi Paul
Yes, you can see that my computer terminology is lacking but I try and learn quickly. I have a large photo library and it seems that Dropbox has trouble handling it.?
But no problem I have been introduced to We Transfer.
Very simple to use, your own photos are compatible no account is needed -free. Up to 1 GB which I think is huge, I think I can upload up to 70, 20 MB photos, it seems a bit slow but maybe they are all the same.?
Now to learn indoor lighting fo still-life detail objects, I like to be able to take photos whenever I like and dealing with the Australian level of UV is hard so the great indoors is right for me.That will be enough of all this I want to get back to modeling and use my new found skills in the presentation.
Cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: WP Rayner on May 07, 2019, 06:54:16 AM
Hi Paul
Yes, you can see that my computer terminology is lacking but I try and learn quickly. I have a large photo library and it seems that Dropbox has trouble handling it.?
But no problem I have been introduced to We Transfer.
Very simple to use, your own photos are compatible no account is needed -free. Up to 1 GB which I think is huge, I think I can upload up to 70, 20 MB photos, it seems a bit slow but maybe they are all the same.?
Now to learn indoor lighting fo still-life detail objects, I like to be able to take photos whenever I like and dealing with the Australian level of UV is hard so the great indoors is right for me.That will be enough of all this I want to get back to modeling and use my new found skills in the presentation.
Cheers


Hi Kim:

Excellent! I'm pleased you've found a solution that fills your needs and is easy and friendly to use. Nothing to be gained from making life more complicated than it already is... ;)

Cheers,
Paul


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Barney on May 07, 2019, 12:43:42 PM
Kim your photos are 100% better with a plain background !
Barney


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 14, 2019, 03:53:43 AM
Hi all.
I have just built a small lightbox from a cardboard box I found. there is a hole for the light 20 watts 6500 Kelvin on the top and a bit of card for the curved back the shots were taken at 100 iso, f 36 and 2.5 shutter speed. i tried taking them outside on my balcony but it was just too bright. The marker boy is part of another barge that I am looking forward to painting
cheers.
(https://images54.fotki.com/v461/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0903-vi.jpg).
(https://images41.fotki.com/v1670/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0921-vi.jpg).
(https://images41.fotki.com/v1670/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_0922-vi.jpg).


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 14, 2019, 01:01:29 PM
You're turning into a professional photographer. -- Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 14, 2019, 04:36:39 PM
Thanks, Russ .
the top picture needs more work on the focus maybe this is to do with the depth of field and lighting the detail on some of the rivets are lost.
This is really bringing out a new level in modeling there is no escape it is all there to see.
It also brings out the possibilities of presentation with dioramas in boxes where you can introduce effects and the such around your models, I look forward to that.
cheers


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Carlo on May 16, 2019, 02:10:06 PM
Kim and Russ,
I am a RANK amateur (emphasis on the RANK) at photography, and mostly just use my iPhone 6. I do have a macro lens for it, for extreme closeups.
Kim's light box looks so simple and easy. I'm wondering about using just 1 bulb overhead. I thought you needed at least 2 lights to eliminate shadows.
The photos, however, look great! What am I missing?  Do I need to be able to adjust t-stops, shutter times, etc.?  You can't do that on an iPhone, right?

Bottom Line... can I get acceptable photos from my phone?   How?
Confused Carlo


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: 1-32 on May 16, 2019, 05:18:00 PM
Hi Carlo.
I personally don't think you can get the effects you want with a cell phone.
unless you use photo editing software that Russ suggested.
my preference is to use a DSLR camera. I went and bought an entry-level camera second hand from a dealer. There are so many out there you know -go and buy a nice camera for the big adventure never use it and ends up in the bottom drawer as a reminder of lost chances. I don't use a fancy lens 50 mm and a cheap tripod yes Carlo I am cheap. Also, are doing a photography course from the local community college you need this as the options on modern DSLR cameras are staggering a lot of buttons have multi-functions. I don't understand a lot of photo editing so I try and keep it inside the camera as much as possible.
with these new photos that I am posting, you can see how my light boxes are evolving, cardboard packing boxes with a single light source. With the cardboard, it is very easy to make new holes for cross lights as needed also the possibility of putting whole models into cheap light boxes is a real possibility.
anyway Cheers.
(https://images54.fotki.com/v627/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_1144-vi.jpg)
(https://images44.fotki.com/v1644/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_1156-vi.jpg).
(https://images45.fotki.com/v1636/photos/3/1816483/16140266/DSC_1163-vi.jpg)


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 17, 2019, 01:32:06 AM
Carlo, I think you can probably shoot very good photos with your iPhone, a lot better than you might think. The trick is to use plenty of light. If you're interested enough to build a light box, copy Kim's, mount your phone on a tripod (they make inexpensive clamps for that), set your iPhone to use a two or three second delay, and shoot the picture. Let me know if you need more information. -- Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: finescalerr on May 21, 2019, 03:00:25 PM
Carlo I snapped off a shot of my 1:48 paper boxcar as an example of what you can do with an iPhone, a tripod, and a table lamp or two. No tricks, just the cropped image. -- Russ


Title: Re: photography to bring out more detail.
Post by: Carlo on May 22, 2019, 07:35:57 AM
Thanks, Russ
I'll give it a try, and let you see what I get.
Carlo