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General Category => Painting & Weathering Techniques => Topic started by: marc_reusser on May 20, 2008, 12:04:25 AM



Title: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on May 20, 2008, 12:04:25 AM
This thread/subject was started/arose in a "project" thread, but so that the subject would be easier to find and more easily expanded on, discussed, and contributed to, it has been moved here as it's own thread:


Belg wrote:

Quote
I model in HO and have trouble finding a balance between adding texture to my wood and when I use some 400-600 grit to defuzz, then loose alot of the texture I worked so hard to put in, I have tried doing it deeper but then my 1x stock either breaks or shreds when cleaning the fuzz. Could you tell or show me any special little steps that helped you?   Thanks so much, Pat

Marc wrote:

Quote
Sorry have been away from the bench of late....work and basic life cr** to deal with.  I am also trying to decide which approach to post, as i have not really been completely happy with any of them. I have used Chuck's method, and variants of it......but as of late I have been working on a "hybrid" of his, combined with Guache and water color, and some of Marcel Ackels approach......The big problem/issue that really needs to be adressed is "scale specificity/correctness" while obtaining the proper "opacity" for the finish without making it appear "painted".   .......one issue is also, what looks good in photo's may not look correct in person and visa-versa.



Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: chester on May 20, 2008, 05:49:38 PM
Being a woodworker by trade affords me the opportunity to use a wide variety of wood species. I'm always curious to know why folks don't specify what type of wood they are using when asking and/or replying to a question about weathering wood. Is everyone using the same kind of wood for their modeling projects? I ask because observing the differences in how each specie behaves in my 1:1 projects has prompted me to try modeling techniques to different woods. I won't go into the results of my experiments but suffice it to say that using certain kinds of wood has produced some interesting effects. I'd also like to add that going outside the modeling supply industry for wood can offer some unique products and a few really good deals.


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on May 21, 2008, 05:34:18 AM
Thanks Marc, your very right in that different scales approach things very differently, I have tried some of Mic Greenberg's methods from his cards and they do not translate well to HO scale at all. Right now I start with a thinned floquil cp gray with lacquer thinner, brushing this on but trying not to get full coverage, using a file card and a scratchbrush to impart grain, when painting I use an open container of thinner and dip into it to help vary the color slightly. After assembling the walls, I plan on using a mixture of turpentine and chalks to wash the wood to get graining pattern. I'm thinking so far my hand has been slightly heavy  so the grain will be a little to pronounced, but it will be a heavily weathered structure so might not be too bad. This is one of the 4 walls I have build so far, I think if I do the rafters 16" on center it might look a little too crowded but will see when I get a little further along. Sorry for posting in your thread Marc, but this is where we started our conversation. If it could be moved that would be fine with me, Thanks Pat
Here's a picture of a wall section I'm working on.

I have also moved this over from the other thread Marc mentioned, Chester you bring up a good point about species of wood. I assumed that most builders used only basswood, and on occasion have seen balsa used but have not heard of too much else being used. I believe that Chris trainclown used a hunk of cedar to produce his own stripwood on his homemade stripwood cutter. Here's the link to it. Chris is an inventive guy who uses what he has at hand and makes it work, although not Osha or for anyone elses idea of safe with some additional gaurds and someone with the ability to work with highend metal milling machine this could be made into a great cutter.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20046&whichpage=1

This is a link to a smart little jig he made to cut them by hand before he build the other electrified version.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/post.asp?method=ReplyQuote&REPLY_ID=214975&TOPIC_ID=17004&FORUM_ID=22


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: lab-dad on May 21, 2008, 09:20:06 AM
Chester,
I have used other species (Other than the ususal birch) like walnut and cherry.
I really like the look of the walnt once colored, gives a good base for the A&I
-Marty


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: RoughboyModelworks on May 21, 2008, 11:07:55 AM
Chester:

I use several different woods depending on the application. Favorites are Swiss Pear, Boxwood, Rhododendron wood and Bass or Lime.

Paul


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: John McGuyer on May 21, 2008, 05:47:24 PM
The guys here on this forum turned me on to pearwood which I love. If you'll look at my 'detailing a K-27', you'll see some cut on a milling machine with a slitting saw just as you suggested. It works very well. I've cut pearwood down to .020" thick consistently with the process and will soon try to go thinner. Since I have a three axis DRO on the machine, it is very easy to dial in whatever thickness you want.

John


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on May 22, 2008, 05:46:49 AM
Guys, although I appreciate the info on the additional types of woods being used to model, I'm thinking we're missing the real point of the thread that being HOW we are working with these types of wood, distressing adding knot holes, how to add basic coloring that was my intent in asking the question.
I have seen a couple of times the mention of pearwood and also its not for the budget modeler.

John, I'm going to go back and take another look at that thread, thank you for posting it as I don't believe I saw the machine you mentioned, Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: chester on May 22, 2008, 03:14:19 PM
Sorry Pat, I didn't mean to digress. I was just curious as to what everyone was using. Some of the "standard" techniques come out a little strange on certain specie. And thanks everyone for the replies, an interesting and diverse selection of woods.
  My own favorite happens to be clear vertical grained white pine that I cut up here in the shop. My treatment is a very simple one for just plain weathered planking. I do all of my distressing with a file card and exacto. I then put a wash of an acrylic dark gray and try to raise the grain for even more texture. When dry, I dry brush the high spots with a very light gray and white. And a final shot with some powders to accent wear marks etc. in olive green and tan. This may not be the most effective but I'm able to achieve acceptable results consistently. I should mention that I only model in 1/87 to date.

(http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z79/chesterf/dio%20build/b5.jpg)


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: TRAINS1941 on May 22, 2008, 03:50:18 PM
Chester

Nice color but I really like the way the grain of the wood looks.  Would be nice to see the whole scene, very nice job.

Jerry


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: John McGuyer on May 22, 2008, 05:25:26 PM
I didn't have a picture of the mill in operation, only was mentioning that is how I made the blocks. If you're interested, I can photograph the mill/saw next time I use it.

I do think all of us are interested in any new ways to work wood,

John


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on June 20, 2008, 10:30:33 PM
Wow, this thread really seems to have stalled, I have been working steadily on the project shown but have been using the same technique as in the past weathering with a scratchbrush and knot holes with a drill bit and good old #11. My base color was SP lettering gray and lacquer thinner thinned to a wash and didn't pay much attention to trying to get full coverage. Now that I have that done my problem has reared its ugly head in that now I have build doors from styrene and am having a terrible time trying to match the coloring. Even the 2 doors one made w/gray styrene the other w/white are different, I have applied some A/I to see if I can get them at least the same as each other and then paint them out from there. By the way the white one was just about completely stripped back down and rebuild from this pic as the glue ooze(new glue)really bugged me.
Marc, since things seem a little slow around here the past few days, maybe we could revisit some of these techniques? I plan on using a wash of alcohol and weathering powders to do the paint coloring, I'm leaning towards a green rather than the typical barn red. What do you guys think? Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on June 25, 2008, 02:59:53 AM
Pat,

Sorry for the delay in responding. On one hand been a bit busy, and on the other, I have pretty much dropped most of the remining RR forums I was on, and rarely visit the ones I still belong to. I am pretty much giving up RR modeling per-say,...I probably over time will still build/finish some stuff that I have started....but other than that I am going to do primarily Armor models.....and the occassional "1/35n600mm" industrial loco/car. [If Russ is interested in the armor and any other odd stuff I will continue to post here...in which case this and the MIG forum will probably be the only ones.]

I think the root of the problem is the fact that you built with two different colors of styrene. Both pieces should have been primered (I use "Mr. Surfacer 1000")...to create a matching/sim base and color to work over.  This would then give me the opportunity to choose/consider a couple of approaches......all though would involve an airbrush applied "wood" tone base color of some kind of acrylic (real quality acrylic, like Tamiya, Vallejo, or Life-Color....not the "craft paint" cr** that so many espouse.)

One option would be to paint the boards overall in a wood "base" tone of your choice, then maybe add a bit of grey, or brown, or black or white, to the base color, to change the hue of the color...and using either a quick mask...such as a board width slit cut in a piece of paper, the edge of a post-it, or a more defined mask with tape......and then spray uneven thin coats of the mixed/added-to color over individula boards, to vary the shades, and tones.  [note that this shading/toning could also be done with thined acrylic, and a board-width flat brush).  make sure you give the acrylics a bit of time to dry/set, between applications of brushed on hues). Lastly I would come in and add some very thinned washes of greys or browns onto the individual boards...or even a slight bit of "dry-brushing"....but not in the sense to "highlight edges" like the horrific "Verlinden Method", but rather with just a very subtle hue/value change of the colors.

Something else to maybe consider...and something I am going to try for the first time on a "wood" finish when I paint the FMW challenge cars is "pre-shading"....I plan to use a dark grey or brown, and airbrush the color into the gaps/spaces between boards, and under board edges/overhangs that in the finished model would be "in shadow"....then I will paint over that, in very thin layers, using the approach above.....always taking care to leave just enough "transparency" to allow the pre-shading to imply depth or slightly "shadowed area". [Think of the effect of pre-shading being a controlled/planned and intentional use of sim to what you are experiencing because of the two different colors of styrene]

I can't really say on how to use the alcohol, as I rarely use it anymore.....it attacks the acrylics that I work with, and can even "soften" or craze the styrene.....I much prefer working with water, or turpentine/odorless thinner, or white spirits. (I do still use acetone for some things, but not for washes on styrene or over acrylics).


Cheers,

Marc



Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: TRAINS1941 on June 25, 2008, 05:52:56 AM
Marc

Sorry to hear about your decision to leave building Modeling RR except for the occasional piece here and there.
I for one would hope that you would still participate on this forum even if its just armour.  I think you bring a lot to the table with your expertise in painting and staining different materials.

Jerry


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: finescalerr on June 25, 2008, 12:54:01 PM
Post your armor modeling, Marc.

Russ


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: lab-dad on June 25, 2008, 01:06:46 PM
Hey Marc,
I'll take all that CHB junk off your hands if your not gonna use it.
S-marty


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on June 25, 2008, 01:47:51 PM
Thanks for the support guys.  Will post if I have anything of value or possible interest. Will probably be more in regards to painting and finishing, or scenic (dio/display base type of stuff). It was a great relief to finally come to the conclusion...and it will save me the trip to Portland as well.

Marty....Hmm CHB......lets see now...a large mill/industrial boiler, a cat diesel engine, electrical generator , 2- Willamette Yarders, 1 Willamette loader, 1-2 AH&D two spool donkeys,.....some other stuff, and about 40-60 packets of detail parts (most logging related such as pulleys and sheaves, slackline carriages, and workshop tools, etc. etc.).......then theres boxes that I don't even remeber whats in them ;D........So do you think you can get that second mortgage on the house?  ;) ;D ;D .......I will probably hold on to this stuff, just in case in the future I get a hankerin' to build something using these (or parts from them).....especially since nobody will likely be making these again.


Marc


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: jacq01 on June 25, 2008, 03:05:19 PM
 What about me  :o   
Quote
Hmm CHB......lets see now...a large mill/industrial boiler, a cat diesel engine, electrical generator , 2- Willamette Yarders, 1 Willamette loader, 1-2 AH&D two spool donkeys,.....some other stuff, and about 40-60 packets of detail parts (most logging related such as pulleys and sheaves, slackline carriages, and workshop tools, etc. etc.

 Reading your decision is a bit of a shock while being away from home.  I long for my workshop, Friday home again.
I hope the discussion on the logging and lumber industry will not be stopped.

 regards  Jacq


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on June 25, 2008, 03:17:20 PM
Hey Marc, thanks so much for the detailed response. I did lightly prime both doors with a light tan color but I guess it was not opaque enough to get good coverage. The ideas for the coloring seem to make perfect sense once you know what they are. I really like the idea of pre-shading between the board but I think in HO that will be very though. I'll try a pin-wash after the wood has been painted.

This might be the time to break in the airbrush, and do some testing. What would you guys recommend as a good practice material that would give the same type of finish as styrene? I bought some styrene sheet the other day and that was not the cheapest thing in the world, maybe I'll try on some cereal box cardboard just to get my feet wet.

I to hope that you will post your modeling of choice right here as I always have appreciated your input and seeing your great work.
By the way Marc, I don't know if you have seen this link from Sierrawest about releasing the CHB line of machinery again.
http://www.sierrawestscalemodels.com/oscale/machine.html
Thanks again,
Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: finescalerr on June 25, 2008, 08:59:54 PM
The most readily available material for getting an airbrush finish comparable to styrene is laser printer paper. If you also want the same feel as styrene, try index cards.

Russ


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on June 25, 2008, 09:47:23 PM
Pat,

For practicing the airbrush, you don't need styrene...plain old white poster board will do just fine for getting the hang of spraying different sized lines and different pressures. The only real difference is that on a porus surface yu are less likely to experience runs and such when shooting to wet or to heavy. zheck anything will work to practice on....many yogurt cups/ontainers for instance are a type of styrene.

To practice techniques for the doors, you could simply build a quick and rough sample door out of strips of 2-ply or 3-ply strathmore.....I would still primer it though...as this will help seal the strathmore...and give you a pretty sim base surface to work over with the paints.......another way to seal the strathmore prior to primer...is applying Grumbacher or sim. "Matte Varnish" (the type used by artists on their paintings; the turpentine clean-up stuff...not water)....this will/should effectively seal the strathmore from any later water based paints and washes.

Actually if you seal with varnish, you could for all intents and purposes build the test door out of a cereal box or "chip-board" (the type of board that the backs of pads of paper are made of).

Don't know if you recall, but all the paving stones and corrugated parts on my "out-of-the-box" project were painted cardboard and paper (the box the model came in, and the instruction sheet)


here's some pics of that:

Paper bucket
(http://www.rbadesign.net/TERRAPIN/Reusser_Military/MR_38tOOB/MR_38tOOB_BucketFinished.jpg)

Paper Corrugated Roofing:
(http://www.rbadesign.net/TERRAPIN/Reusser_Military/MR_38tOOB/MR_38tOOB_CorrugMetalFinished.jpg)

Paper coblestones, corrugated and other paper debris:
(http://home.earthlink.net/~rbadesign/MR_38tOOB_BaseCompleted1_70.jpg)



Jacq....No worries about the logging discussion and things, that will still go on. (BTW. there is a fantastic group of modelers...some of the best in europe and the world... that has regular (monthly?) open house/get-together in Arnheim. They are armor guys but that should not matter...techniques are techniques.....let me know if you are interested, and I can get you the info).


Marc


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on June 26, 2008, 05:21:15 AM
Marc, it took me a while to find that thread and all I can say is WOW, :o your WAY outside the box http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=62.30 and very far in front of me and most of us mortal humans with techniques that I never even heard of , no less tried. A wealth of quality information in that one thread alone, was this something that came about as a contest as you said they would have a problem with the putty being used? If you have time I would love to see more of these types of threads, were there many entries and do you have any pics of them?

I think the yogurt cup will be great practice, as my family eats thats stuff all the time. Is there a good book or reference material/primer/thread somewhere to read about airbrushing. I bought one book but not real happy with it as it dealt mostly with how to paint t-shirts. I keep meaning to buy some chipboard but my Michaels doesn't carry it, anybody know a place that would carry that and 3m 465 tape I would appreciate a link. Did the google search but keep coming up with places that will only sell you a case or charge $30 for a roll.

I have to say seeing that OOB thread has really opened my eyes to what Russ said in there, that as modelers we need to expand our thought process to include new and maybe strange techniques which might or might not work, but try and practice. I'm guilty of the copy the designers kits as a scratchbuilder and will try to do one in the near future which is from a real prototype and try to recreate all I see in the picture. I've seen SOOOO many times people say it takes so long to do this or that, what the rush its something you do for fun and relaxation, so to me the longer it lasts the better. Its not a race but a journey to get to a desired result.

Marc, I was on Mig forum this morning and have to say I love the content but just have a problem with the time things take to load (I have optimum online too/don't know how a dial up guy would fair)and for some reason on my computer some of the pics in the threads just don't show up. I have tried to go to my over ride features and let the forum post cookies and images but still no luck. Is there a really good IT guy out there that might be able to help me with this problem?? :(

Is there a freeware out there for something like the cad program you mentioned, I'm just really interested in getting my feet wet and seeing if I have the ability to do this type of layout or will I have to resort to the pencil and invest in a large block of erasers.

If you guys haven't figured it out by now I have been revived  ;D to do some more modeling less BS'ing, and really appreciate any and all input, not just from Marc, so please feel free to post links and/or ideas, I know seeing the quality that Marc, Gordon, Chuck, Brian, Revelia and my buddy Karl Osolinki, just to name a few can be intimidating but we all have to start and learn somewhere. Thanks so much, Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: John McGuyer on June 26, 2008, 09:21:33 AM
Marc,

Sorry to hear of your decision to diminish your participation in this forum. I have learned a great deal from your posts and want to thank you very much.

John


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: chester on June 26, 2008, 05:46:08 PM
Marc, I too am sorry to see such a wealth of information (and a great modeler) become less accessible to the forum. Please touch base from time to time.

I would like to recommend a source, especially in these coming days of election campaigning, many of the signs you will be seeing throughout our country will be made of styrene. A great opportunity to lessen the exposure of those you do not support and acquire some styrene sheets at the same time.


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Krusty on June 26, 2008, 06:35:43 PM
Quote
I was on Mig forum this morning and have to say I love the content but just have a problem with the time things take to load (I have optimum online too/don't know how a dial up guy would fair)and for some reason on my computer some of the pics in the threads just don't show up. I have tried to go to my over ride features and let the forum post cookies and images but still no luck. Is there a really good IT guy out there that might be able to help me with this problem??

Pat

Sorry, I'm not the IT guy you're after, but FWIW the MIG forum does have problems with the number of users overwhelming the system. It works a whole lot better if you can manage to find a time when usage is lower. Many of the photos are linked from photo hosting sites and will disappear if the link changes. This is an ongoing annoyance with web forums – a good reason to save interesting threads when you see them.

Quote
I would like to recommend a source, especially in these coming days of election campaigning, many of the signs you will be seeing throughout our country will be made of styrene. A great opportunity to lessen the exposure of those you do not support and acquire some styrene sheets at the same time.

Trouble is, they're usually PVC rather than styrene. Solvent doesn't work so well on them, except to improve the signwriting.....


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on June 27, 2008, 03:17:46 AM
Shucks...thanks for the concern :-[ :-[...but I wasn't planning on quitting this forum.....just my modeling focus...and most all the other RR forums. Since it's Ok with Russ I will continue to post the new stuff...especially the techniques and finishing aspects.......it will just be up to the reader to look past the fact that it's not RR,m and decide where/how they could be implemented on RR stuff.

Pat....as krusty mentioned, there are server issues on the MIG forum. The forum has grown substantially over the years and With his proimary focus being his business, Mig is trying address the issue when possible.

Insofar as 2-D "freeware" drawing software I unfortunately can't say......for free 3-D drawing software with a really easy learning curve I would give Google "Sketchup" a try www.sketchup.com I use it for the 3D drawings that I used to show on RRl and that i have shown here. Printing to "scale" is a bit of an issue with it, as that feature is only available through a plug-in called "layout"...a feature of the "Pro" version....however with some forethought and messing with the print-out scaling on a copier or printer it is feasable.  The neat thing about the 3D software is that you get a good feel of what the building massing/proportions will look like.

Glad to see you getting backing in the modeling mood/spirit.....I always enjoyed your outlook, participation and work over on RRL.

Cheers,

Marc



Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: TRAINS1941 on June 27, 2008, 07:01:03 PM
Marc

Now you tell us your not leaving the forum, after we all wrote you off :)
Thank God we sure would have missed all your humor and input.
Just kidding glad your going to still be with us, and after talking to Marty today he seems real happy that your staying!!

Jerry


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on June 28, 2008, 08:12:34 AM
Marc, my son had  downloaded the sketch up program a while ago, I was trying to fool around with it and did not get very far. I'm thinking that I'll need to read some of the instructions/help pages and do some experimenting. Marc, I try to call a spade a spade if I don't like something I'm not going to stroke someone ego by saying it looks wonderful. I don't think people will get any better if you don't tell them so. This will only mean they will make more of the same quality since they were told it looked good. If its someone I feel comfortable with I will either email or PM them to try and help. Thanks again for your help. Pat

I don't know how many of you guys are familiar with Scotty Mason, and DVD series,  I  purchased his latest one with Brian Nolan as the instructor and he mentioned using graph paper to keep things aligned and build over but did not really elaborate, have any of you used a similar technique? I don't know how would you use it to build an interior stud wall and then make it disappear?? Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Scratchman on June 28, 2008, 10:59:03 AM
Pat
Graph paper is a great tool for model building. Tape down your graph paper wall layout to a flat surface, with a sheet of wax paper taped down over the top. Now you can glue the wall together and the glue will not stick to the wax paper. Use weights to hold down parts for gluing.T his will work in all scales and with most materials and glues.

Gordon Birrell 


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: lab-dad on June 28, 2008, 07:17:40 PM
Pat,
FWIW I do all my building on glass.
Nothing (really) sticks to it and I can place anything; plans, graph ect under it.

Brian Nolan?.....never heard of him.....

-Marty


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: chester on June 29, 2008, 07:35:02 AM
Pat,
FWIW I do all my building on glass.
Nothing (really) sticks to it and I can place anything; plans, graph ect under it.

-Marty

Ditto and when things are glued up, I place another piece of glass on top to weight things flat until dry but still see that I've kept the project square.


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: k27rgs on July 02, 2008, 07:07:42 AM
The paper bucket, roofing and cobblestones......

 absolutely brilliant  !!!!!!!

    The cobblestones, look like one of Marc's building site projects

 regards

   "M"

    www.modvid.com.au



Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on July 02, 2008, 03:00:33 PM
Guys, when working on the glass with the plans underneath isn't there some distortion/magnification issues from the glass itself? I have some 1/2 or 3/8 tempered pieces I could use if that not the case. Thanks Pat


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: lenelg on July 03, 2008, 12:16:34 AM
Guys, when working on the glass with the plans underneath isn't there some distortion/magnification issues from the glass itself?

Since you are dealing with quality flat glass, distortion/magnification should not be an issue. The main problem would be parallax error, i. e. the thickness of the glass puts distance between the plans and your project, so you need to view things from a consistent angle, or your project will move relative to the plans..

Lennart Elg


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on July 03, 2008, 02:09:26 AM
Maybe I'm wierd...but I do one of three things (depending on how lazy I am and what will work best for the project) when building anything.

1.  I draw my drawings in CAD and print them out to the exact scale. I then use 3M #77 spray adhesive and mount them on a smooth piece of matte-board, or on a piece of foam-core board.  I then use scrap pieces of stripwood and glue it down where I need/deem, in a type of jig and/or stops, to ensure exact alignment. Then when I just use a very minimal amout of yellow carpenters glue, so that none will seep out when the joint is assembled/compressed.

2. I build a jig out of styrene (on styrene sheet), based upon the dimensions needed. Then use the same gluing approach as above.

3. I build a temp jig using styrene or wood, using double sided tape, on whatever I have at hand: glass, steel machining plate, my cutting matt, piece of masonite etc.......

.......another thing I quite frequently use on smaller projects is using pushed into place steel blocks and a steel surface, to create a "square" two sides to work against, I then place the first side and end, and then use "spacer blocks/strips" to space/add consecutive parallel members.....always using machinists squares to make sure it's staying in square, and an additional block to add compression on joints..

I guess what I am getting at here is .....jig.....and not so much glue that it seeps out.


Marc


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Belg on July 03, 2008, 05:03:23 AM
Marc, I have done pretty much all three of those methods, I've attached a few shots of different ones I've made and used. I would like to add in the first pic I used foamcore and used straight pins pushed into the foam as stops to build a deck, I also used the pins to hold the joist upright and aligned. Then when I started laying on the decking material I removed the pins as I glued them down. Worked great for me. Pat

parallax error this is the $10 dollar word I could not remember when I was trying to make my point above, thanks Lennart for coming up with that.

One more quick question, why is it when I hit preview the pics don't show??


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: marc_reusser on July 03, 2008, 01:52:09 PM
Pat....

Exactly what I was getting at.  I guess I don't see/understand the need for the glass :-\...if you build "clean" there should be no, or at most minimal, glue seepage....but I guess that's just me bing cantankerous ::) ;D


The reason the pics don't show in preview, is because the post/text and photo files have not been uploaded (posted) to the site/forum.....it is merely a preview of the text, formatting and any html effects (IE. Bold, color, etc.).

Marc


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: chester on July 03, 2008, 03:39:21 PM
The only reason I use glass is to be able to view the grid under so I keep square and/or parallel. A jig would be suitable for much of that but I often have to build jigs for my work and don't want my modeling efforts to feel too much like my work.


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Younger on July 11, 2008, 03:13:51 PM
Here are a couple of pics of simple jigs I constructed out of styrene scrap, in this case for the belfry of the Calico Fire House I'm building in 1/48.
-Younger


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: jacq01 on July 13, 2008, 02:51:55 PM

  Marc, Pat,

   
Quote
Exactly what I was getting at.  I guess I don't see/understand the need for the glass Undecided...if you build "clean" there should be no, or at most minimal, glue seepage....but I guess that's just me bing cantankerous Roll Eyes Grin

  I only use a glass plate  (under the drwg!!!)  when I need a flat part, which I use as measurement base
  on the model. Glue seepage ????? I apply most glue on wooden models with a sewing pin.

  Jacq
   
 


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: myron on July 14, 2008, 06:37:21 PM
Younger,

That is really neat.  Is this a kit or scratchbuilt?


Myron


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Younger on July 15, 2008, 07:28:56 AM
I'm scratching it in 1/48 from an old Al Armitage plan set. The bldg was unpainted wood, with white windows. I modified Grandt windows as shown in the picture, and placed them in the walls, with the frames covered with stripwood, so only the windows themselves show.
-Younger


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: myron on July 17, 2008, 03:36:09 PM
Thanks Younger.

What are you using to stain your wood?


Myron


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: Younger on July 18, 2008, 07:38:49 AM
It's made from denatured alcohol (dries quick, without warping) and brown leather dye (not polish). Start with a quantity of alcohol, add dye little by little and test until it looks right. For repeatability, it helps to measure as you go! [grin]
-Younger


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: lab-dad on July 21, 2008, 10:40:08 AM
Here is the wall for my large scale diorama.
Several coats of silverwood, additional ink stains and holes.
Then Chuck's peeling paint in two colors.
It is supposed to represent recycled wood from a......barn or something.
-Marty


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: finescalerr on July 21, 2008, 12:27:59 PM
Excellent weathering and wood treatment, young Martin! Among the best I've seen. -- Russ


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: myron on July 22, 2008, 11:50:40 PM
Beautiful Marty!

Where can I find info on Chucks technique that you refer to?




Myron


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: finescalerr on July 23, 2008, 02:20:50 AM
You are on this site and you didn't happen to read the December 2007 Modelers' Annual? The technique is there in detail. -- Russ


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: myron on July 23, 2008, 04:21:09 AM
Thank you Russ.

I guess I'll have to try and find a copy somewhere. My LHS which is not really a train shop, just a general hobby and craft shop with some trains, RC, plastic models, and crafts type stuff, doesn't carry it. They have Model Railroader, Finescale Modeler, and some RC plane mags.

This was just the first site I came to, and saw all the neat work. I am probably in over my head here. Is there a site that someone can recommend to me that is maybe a bit more broad and beginner oriented?

Myron

 


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: TRAINS1941 on July 23, 2008, 05:30:32 AM
Myron you might want to join here.

http://www.railroad-line.com

But if you were smart like we know you are you would check this site out all the time you can learn an awful lot from the guys here.
The other forum has beginners to people that are also here.  So just hang on for the ride it is worth the trip.  Oh an I would subscribe to this magazine here!  And no I don't get anything for the plug.  Its just that good of a book!!

Jerry


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: myron on July 23, 2008, 02:09:43 PM
Thanks Jerry. Looks interesting. A lot of stuff to read through. Their a chatty bunch aren't they ;D

Myron


Title: Re: Weathered Wood
Post by: TRAINS1941 on July 23, 2008, 02:43:51 PM
Myron

Yes they are chatty :)  But they are some good molders and will help you with the simplest or the hardest questions you can give them.  But sites are a real learning experience, and you will get to know and talk to some really interesting people.

Jerry