Westlake Publishing Forums

General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 03:45:02 AM



Title: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 03:45:02 AM
A long time ago, when the world was young, in a land of rocky cliffs & wild seas, there lived a boy with his parents & sisters in a what had been originally a gentleman industrialist's town house. By then the place was a little run down, and the parents were struggling to modernise the house, for eg. installing an inside bathroom, father acheiving this with the aid of the newly published Practical Engineer,  & Practical Householder magazines.
As the gents place of work? / oversight was a couple of miles away, when the house was built, before the days of the motor car, they had a simple stable block for housing his groom/ stable boy with a loft/ living space over in the grounds of the house. by this time though, it was unused.   Built to a standard for servant use only, it did not even have ceilings just open rafters. While there were odds & ends of tools & junk on the ground floor, upstairs was just about empty. Great fun was had by the 6 - 12 year olds,
Beacause access to upstairs was by outside stone steps open to a lane, that door was always kept locked, the only other access was by a trap door from the hay loft area to the tack room, with a rickety vertical ladder, which could just about cope with the weight of children, but would have been problematic for adults. Parents were rarely seen in this hideway.
But time dims the memory & details & dimensions are over 60 years ago   .   .  . ....  


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: marc_reusser on March 14, 2012, 04:13:49 AM
OK...I'll bite...... :)


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 04:55:14 AM
By the time they lived there, horses had long gone & the stable doors had been altered to take  a motor car. There had been a people door leading to a passage way through the side of the stable but still under the loft. Because of the ground layout when the stable door was widened access being on the slant there was still not enough room for a car to drive through,  so .   .  . ...


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 05:28:44 AM
if I can do it perhaps a 'Sketch' will help
Original layout
 with stable door & person doors separate


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 05:31:32 AM
Alteration to accomodate car




Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on March 14, 2012, 06:06:24 AM
Will this be 1:12?


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 06:12:53 AM
So Sleuthing.
 I remembered what furniture was in which rooms, especially the orientation of beds, wardrobes, dressing tables & as the house is the same width as the stable block, that gave me some idea of that dimension  => 18 ft
Father had grandiose ideas as to cars, he had previosly been driving Humber Super Snipes, for a living ( limosines of their day ) & he bought an old Armstrong Siddley which just fitted inside the stable. Not that it was ever seen  going, as it needed a lot of work on it & his boss's work vehicle an old Ford E83 was left outside in the lane overnight
So that gave me an approximate length for the stable itself => 18 ft

So with the tack room beyond the stable box that gives us





Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 06:15:04 AM
Will this be 1:12?

Oh, yes this is 1/12th
 it may be used in conjunction with the packing shed
 maybe?
ideas?


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 06:23:34 AM
The roof was giving problems,
as this building is at a distance from any road that Google street view used
Just a few tantsalising glimpses were gained
Old Maps were very few & indistinct
& even Sattelite pics did not give a very good idea
BUT
I think I now have a good idea of what it used to look like as the property has undergone a lot of changes since back then

So using Sketch up this is what is the foundation of the new project


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: Barney on March 14, 2012, 06:55:16 AM
A long time ago, when the world was young - My Dad had a BSA motor bike and side car and we lived in a Prefab on the Southend on Sea road !
I love a bit of atmosphere to create inspiration for our models -Your Cornish Stable sounds like its got all of it.
Barney


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on March 14, 2012, 09:21:13 AM
A long time ago, when the world was young - My Dad had a BSA motor bike and side car and we lived in a Prefab on the Southend on Sea road !

That helps explain a lot

(http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee275/gfadvance/wallace-08.jpg)


Sorry about that Don, look forward to seeing how your idea develops


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:02:57 PM
Barney, back in those days my Uncle from Lancashire visited us, he had a Big bike & side car. I remember the look on the PC on point duty when we drove by, in Penzance
Uncle, Aunty & cousin on the bike, with 4 children & mother in the sidecar, on way home went up a 1in 4 no trouble at all, cant remember what the bike was though  
Gordon I got a similar one to that in 1/12 sent by our grandchidren ( because it was 1/12th not because it was wallace! )


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:11:16 PM
This is what the roof looks like
front view,
 but in this view I got the chimney wrong as I was looking at the wrong roof in google street view



Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:25:42 PM
This is the rear view with chimney, which is in the right area, but I am not sure if the chimney base should be inside the outer wall instead of outside it, doesnt quite look right


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:28:48 PM
So, first step, print out for reference


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:35:20 PM
Step 2
draw up individual walls with measurements
 give each an an identity 'a' 'b' etc.




Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: marc_reusser on March 14, 2012, 01:39:37 PM
Very neat.

The front vaguely reminds me of some guys place in Shropshire. He too has been working on his for what must be decades. ;D

M


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:44:40 PM
draw each piece to scale on card & cut out to see if they look right
( brown bits are remains of parcel tape used for holding together for mock up, but did not have camera to hand )

This also allowed me to layout parts either way up to get best use of thin ply that was to hand

[ due to being in the " straights of the times" ie. feeling the pinch, it is planned that NOTHING will be bought in for this project, if I can help it, a work round attitude will be employed ]
The ply used came from a piece of furniture no longer in gainful employment!


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 01:56:27 PM
 A base was formed out of polystyrene sheet laminated with cereal cardboard ( see details in The Packing Shed )

http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1191.90

reply No. 96


then the plan was drawn on
with the walls being given their identity
So I dont get TOO confused




Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:01:20 PM
Cut out parts
And find somewhere to photograph them
big models in small rooms some times proves a challenge




Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:12:37 PM
The intention with this building is to give the impression of scale thickness walls ( with in reason)without weight
The packing shed was made out of 3/4 chipboard & is quite heavy, so I plan this one to be a lot lighter, so the walls are planned to be hollow, with the outer skin of ply for structural strength, & with card inner walls, with zigzag card inserts like some cheap interior doors were( are? ) made
My motto is "belts AND braces" so all essential joints are to be reinforced with corners ( hidden within the wall structure), If the weather had been kinder I might have gone outside & ripped this corner down in half ( too much this size & I wont save much weight)


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:20:32 PM
As I had a broken dolls house window it the roundtwit box, I cut it down to the size I required & rebuilt it ( recycling, Yeah )

Now the prtoblem with dolls house windows is that they are designed to sit on TOP of the outside wall, which in Cornwall is not realistic ( although I notice a lot of american houses built out of siding DO have that style
Demonstrated here with some spare door trims


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:23:51 PM
So the window front was sanded a bit to produce a flat surface rather than the architrave shape, and it was glued to the INSIDE of the opening





Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:27:24 PM
When set the wall was turned over & the return was filled in with some strip wood, still needs gaps around filling in but I will leave that till I get to the wall surface which requires a whitewashed rough stone finish


Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 14, 2012, 02:37:52 PM
View through the trees courtesy of str**t view
Notice the chimney, without knowing I made one just like it last week!!
the houses behind go up the hill




Title: Re: Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 15, 2012, 06:54:08 AM
Now the eagle eyed among you may have noticed an anomaly in the size of the base
it was originaly going to be 18" wide by 26" long, but due to the fact that the piece of polystyrene that was laminated to form the base was only 18" by 24" the building has been resized down to suit


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 02:08:57 AM
Before I get too far along in assembling the walls, I need to settle some facts about the original interior of a 19th century stable/ loose box.
While the servants part of the building would be very basic, the rich tended to lavish resources on their horses

So questions for any Equestrians amongst us
The outside of the cottage ( which is what we as kids called it) was rough stone whitewashed over
But would the interior of the loose box be smoother, so less ledges for dust debris & bugs to lodge? ( and easier to whitewash)

 Now I have seen many hay feeders/ racks on stable walls, and while a rickety woodworm eaten one might be appropriate for a rustic farm stable, I feel an industrialist in the mining industry might have either got his blacksmith to knock one up, or bought a metal one instead. Whatever, I favour the semi quarter round type that will go in a corner, as with the design of the doors & windows in the box, it would seem the most practical solution
Thought? ideas? anyone?

Although the building will be put to a 21st Cent use, its origins & fingerprint will be 3rd quarter 19th Cent  


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 02:21:01 AM
A problem with remembering details of the stable interior is that back then ( when the world was young) there was no electric in there, and there was only one very small window facing east, the main door was not opened unless Dad was working in there. So it was dark without details being obvious.
One would imagine that before the barn type door was fitted for car access, the original stable type split door would have afforded light & ventilation


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 03:34:01 AM
Two of stable walls joined, right hand still just ply,
left hand one skinned with cereal card, & sealed with white pva, & acrylic paint mix



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 03:43:36 AM
another coat of acrylic/pva mix
{ colours, when out shopping I look out for acrylic paint that has been drastically reduced in price, whatever the colour, as then its almost given away, so I use them as an under coat}

Right wall spacing strips are ripped out of old furniture shelf wood, so that depth is uniform



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 03:47:35 AM
On the opposite wall (not yet fixed ) area above where work bench will be, is framed & card strips  zigzaged & glued in place. Card front sealed & drying before being applied, card is not being used on area below, using hard board to give strength to structure of bench

As the ply will be hidden I use  it as a mixing pallette!! ;D



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 03:55:00 AM
Card front fixed, does it look wonky? Yes it is as I found out this morning. Must have been tired last night


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 03:57:36 AM
Hardboard with bench back support in place



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 04:00:44 AM
When cutting wood on saw bench, if any odd sraps are to hand, I often rip them down to whatever might be a handy stock size, so this was at hand so cut down for support legs


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 04:03:54 AM
two fixed walls given a coat of pink plaster colour just to see what it looks like, wont end up this colour though
floor beams floating randomly in space
partially built bench
& chimney pot that will end up on roof



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 06:46:00 AM
Card front fixed, does it look wonky? Yes it is as I found out this morning. Must have been tired last night

So when cutting some wood on the saw table yesterday, ended up by chance with this wedge shaped strip, which came in handy to correct the error in measurement


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 16, 2012, 06:48:27 AM
Rapid jig for cutting boards for bench top



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 02:17:48 AM
Elements loosely in place to show angle of access



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 02:19:06 AM
View into stable from tack room


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 03:02:55 AM
View down thro the floor joists
for reference these joists are 6mm slices, cut from shelf of a bookshelf that was 22mm thick. Possibly manufactured about 1930s, so well dry.
Dont know what sort of wood it is, very soft to saw, but not weak in structure, fine grained, but with some very small reddish flecks in, similar to those in beech

         


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 03:13:31 AM
This is very much a work in progress, I am having a bad day this morning, from the Chronic Fatigue thing,
so just playing with camera to keep the intrest going seeing some photo shot angles that are possible. Several things need changing, a lot only has first base colour, walls need application of whitewashed stone texturing ( can you get an app for that "text turing"   :D )

Not happy with the laminated base, the first one I did for the leanto outside the Packing shed was 2 layers of polystyrene sheet with 3 layers of card encapsulating it.
ended up dead square & flat. this is only one layer of polystyrene & has a definate curve in it, also if the stable is to be used with the packing shed it would also need to be another 10 mm thicker to match


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:29:55 AM
Decided the stable would still have its hay rack in the back corner
First cut 2 circles to form top rim & sides using compass cutter
used 60 thou black plasticard



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:34:04 AM
Marked out one segment, & drilled holes for 9 bars as per example found on web

http://www.belowstairs.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Equine__Horse_Brasses__Stable_Fittings__etc__18.html

13th item down

This will form the top of the rack



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:41:18 AM
Top & 2 sides assembled, as this is going to be quite fragile, I have added 2 side straps to joint the top corners together & added a temporary 'handle' in white for use during construction & painting, when cut off when completed the bits left in the corners will add extra strength


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:44:16 AM
Using card template to fix first bar ( middle one )
the bars should be round, but as I have not got any to hand, I am using half round instead which will also  bend to shape easier



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:47:36 AM
Fix one either side, as the bars run down parrallel, the holes in the side bars are drilled accordingly ( NOT equidistant around the segment )



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:50:54 AM
all 9 bars insitu, this simple project was more complicated than I first thought



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:53:23 AM
Gave the two fixed walls a first treatment
Polyfiller/pva/ water mix, applied in a thin layer
texture acheived using a offcut of floor joist about 2 ins long on edge as mix had started to go off


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 11:55:17 AM
when wall coating was tacky dry, laid hay rack on its side to see how it looked



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 17, 2012, 04:19:57 PM

modified the wall texture & done some weathering of the rack, needs a better pic in the daylight tomorrow



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on March 17, 2012, 07:14:24 PM
The construction of the hay rack is pretty clever!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on March 17, 2012, 11:24:26 PM
Like the way this is shaping up. When was the last time we all watched a hay rack being built? The website you linked to for antique horse stable bits is very interesting too.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 18, 2012, 07:06:21 AM
The construction of the hay rack is pretty clever!
Thanks Ray, I am getting pretty hamfisted in my old age, hands dont exactly hit the target accurately every time, so the white 'stick' gives strength while assembling.
 Doing something new like this I try to think how would the blacksmith have gone about this? & try to replicate his work.
I have deviated a bit as wrought iron would not need strengthening fillets in the corners


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 18, 2012, 07:11:17 AM
Like the way this is shaping up. When was the last time we all watched a hay rack being built? The website you linked to for antique horse stable bits is very interesting too.
Thanks Ian lots a of bits of detail on that site

It was quite difficult to photograh as well, being of such a complicated shape having curves in three planes. It took a while looking at their photos to work it out, especialy the dimentions


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 18, 2012, 01:42:59 PM
Did a cill for the window above the tack room, its even got its drip groove!




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 18, 2012, 01:46:26 PM
Then I realised I had forgotten about the lintel OVER the window
so adjustments neccesary
I want to slightly set back the wood lintel & not have it flush with the outside wall



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 18, 2012, 02:01:43 PM
View in this afternoons sunshine
Comment about wall texture please
What I have tried to replicate is a wall built out of flat stones rather like slate, but approx 2" thick, then given regular coats of whitewash for stable hygene,

I applied a mix of polyfilla, pva, acrylic paint and water very thinly with a wallpaper scraper, when starting to set worked it by dabbing with the edge of a scrap piece of floor joist, footprint of 6mm x 40mm, when set lightly rubbed down with fine abrasive to remove the peak of the stipples, it then looked too flat so gave 2 more coats of fairly thick white acrylic with some pva mixed in, finishing off brushing horizontally with the stone bed.
I feel it needs highlighting with some grey thin lines for dust
but my wife says it looks realistc leave it as it is


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on March 18, 2012, 04:19:52 PM
The amount of rust on the hay rack suggests it has been there for some time so maybe dust on the wall would help to conjure up a scene that has been around a while.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on March 18, 2012, 05:56:28 PM
If it was me, I might go over the wall with a very thin wash of brownish black and let it settle naturally onto the protrusions of the wall.




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 06:23:45 AM
Thanks Ray for reminding me,
 yes I used avery thin wash on the wall of the Packing shed to good effect, try & give a bit of diferentiation in tone around the feeder,
Do I forget more than I remember?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on March 19, 2012, 09:39:59 AM
Don,

certainly looks like a well whitewashed wall to me ............. although think I may add a few very diluted grey washes to it with maybe the odd touch of brown just to age it slightly 


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 11:28:50 AM
Did a weak black wash with a hint of grey all over, when dry did a brown wash where the dust from the hay would be prevalent

I Like this shot




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 11:32:31 AM
But in places the change from brown to black is a bit too abrupt



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 11:35:20 AM
Having said which I do like the way the brown fades around both sides of the feeder where the hay being pulled out of the rack would have flicked the dust off the wall a bit, perhaps?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on March 19, 2012, 01:35:19 PM
That's looking good, IMHO. Of course it all depends on how recently painted the wall is supposed to be, but I would think that in a horse stall dust would accumulate pretty quickly.

If you're concerned that some areas might be too dark you can always tone them down with a wash of white.



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 02:07:03 PM
That's looking good, IMHO. Of course it all depends on how recently painted the wall is supposed to be, but I would think that in a horse stall dust would accumulate pretty quickly.

If you're concerned that some areas might be too dark you can always tone them down with a wash of white.


It did occur to me to perhaps try a white wash but with the wall upside down so that the colour would collect on what would end up being the the lower edges, so still retaining the dust on the top edges.

Time frame, quite a while since the last horse departed, but building run down & not redecorated, and building used for repair work, so more dust

But that does not mean that I might not do a photoshoot with a horse in there just because I can!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 04:05:44 PM
Done the lintel over the window, with it being recessed it gives the cornish character I think


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 19, 2012, 04:09:56 PM
Door lintel

Edit. this is not the final wall finish, just coloured for the look


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on March 22, 2012, 01:07:13 PM
While waiting for glue to dry, made up a couple of ladders

a 3 part extending ladder & a widow cleaners ladder


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 03:01:39 AM
As a lot of interior detail will be visible, but wont be get-at-able when assembled, at this stage the only fixed parts are the two walls the hay rack will be mounted on & the base, the rest is just a snug dry fit to ensure it all fits properly, so I can then finish & detail the interior, So ignore the floating wall etc.,
its work in progress


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 03:06:50 AM
The wall appears to be floating due to the need to get levels right for the drainage channel seen in the centre there
As the base is not solid, its a styrene & card lamination, I wanted to avoid building it to top surface level & then cutting out as that would have weakened the structure


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 03:33:15 AM
Working on the tack room wall as that will be the most inaccessable part, Framework for hollow wall designed to support floor beams, with spacers at 16" centres on back wall


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 03:50:33 AM
Tack room wall cosmetic spacers added as part of front card leaf & wall given coat of texture, opposite wall added & fixed


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 03:56:40 AM
3 walls done complete with lintel over door


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 04:00:26 AM
So turn attention to gable wall, corner strengthener same dimension as wall thicknes, framing door way & window with scrap bits of wood that will only show one face, if that


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 04:03:21 AM
First coat of surface mix before application of texture finish


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 04, 2012, 01:16:39 PM
Texture applied to surface & some wash applied,


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 05, 2012, 06:34:51 AM
Before I could fit the workbench along the stable wall, I needed to get the floor levels sorted & found some old 1970s ceiling tiles that had a moulded beveled edge to make up the levels


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 05, 2012, 06:36:38 AM
Nice snug fit for drain channel


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 20, 2012, 04:40:09 PM
Cut cereal card into 2" x 3" slabs after painting card gray, & glued in place



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 20, 2012, 04:47:15 PM
Made up a drain cover as per type that a blacksmith would do, drilling holes in wrought iron plate,


 and fitted in place at end of gully



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 20, 2012, 04:57:03 PM
One thing I had of that time long ago, & far away, was fond memories of a go-cart I built from pram wheels, some planks & a couple of boxes,
 used to race down the hills, & use it about the garden to shift stuff about
Funny, at the time I was dissapointed that I could not get hold of the larger better quality pram wheels, so had to settle for pushchair wheels that were only about 7" diam.
On reflection small wheels on the front were an advantage as they gave a greater turning circle before catching on your feet which were on the front plank doing the steering


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 20, 2012, 08:43:47 PM
The floor turned out nicely, and the go-cart is a great bit of extra detail!



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Malachi Constant on April 21, 2012, 12:01:34 AM
Neat stuff!  I like the way the drain breaks the "bottom" level of the floor and adds some extra dimension there.  -- Dallas


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Andi Little on April 21, 2012, 12:51:17 AM
Great progress - and I am quietly following along.

However .............. the "trolly" is a eureka moment - one of those; "Why didn't I think of that"?

I hesitate to say it but in the interests of honesty - yep! I'm going to thieve that wholesale - Well done.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 21, 2012, 01:08:32 AM
Thanks Guys,
History repeats itself, Just as when I built the real size one, wheels were hard to get hold of , had to walk around the town till I spotted an unused pushchair in someones garden, & go & ask if I could have it,
6-7 decades later, times are hard, now I could not find small wheels ( without buying that is) back wheels are off a dolls house tricycle effort, but did not look right on front, & would foul feet when steering, so for the front I cannabalised an old 1970s Matchbox Kingsize digger, Aveling Barford I believe. ( dont tell Gordon  :D )
So the story goes that the front wheels in the model world came off an old Triang or mettoy childs Ride on tractor
Doesnt look right to me cause of my memories
But Hey, if I could enjoy it back then, whatever, so I can now

PS, you did notice its the deluxe version with upturned tomato tray for a seat, may even end up with an old discarded cushion on top!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 21, 2012, 01:36:53 AM
Thanks Andi, It wasnt in the original idea, but after a few weeks churning my memory over for details, I remembered it Had great fun on it used it to go down a 1 in 4, that is until the local policeman saw me take it out the back gate & demanded where I was going to run it,
"well down the hill "
""Dont you dare, or I will tell your parents""

Actually its scary thinking back, but there was so little traffic on those roads back then, & the bus only ran every 90 mins, so you could avoid that easily
and it was so much FUN.

Trouble with memory, after building an internal ( later addition  of brick ) chimney with copper boiler at base, I remember later the original cottage had an external stone chimney & found an old family photo to prove it.  DOH.
photo 1-  brick base for copper boiler, with access door for sweeping chimney
photo 2-   chimney in brick
photo 3-   Chimney top ( from street view I see that is still there
All still in need of final weathering


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 21, 2012, 01:46:55 PM
Removed the unprototypical back bars from the hay rack, found A Guiness poster that I thought apropriate for a stable setting!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 21, 2012, 01:51:11 PM
Looks like autumn leaves have blown in
floor given another wash of brownish colour

set of fittings fashioned out of some brass strip
Anyone any ideas of their use/application


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: finescalerr on April 21, 2012, 01:57:35 PM
Gradually shaping up, isn't it? -- Russ


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 21, 2012, 01:58:22 PM
The tomato box has had the legend " Guernsey Toms " added in red
just realised what was not right, forgot to add the green line top & bottom!!
Still needs the addition of 2 comfort items
cushion
&
brake!!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 21, 2012, 05:59:02 PM
The Humbrol tin is almost scale for a 10 litre paint bucket! Just change the name?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 01:13:08 AM
The Humbrol tin is almost scale for a 10 litre paint bucket! Just change the name?
Oh, much simpler than that Ian, got one somewhere that has the big print, name, obscured with paint runs & only the small print details left showing!!

Love it when things transfer straight accross from real to scale


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 01:22:37 AM
Gradually shaping up, isn't it? -- Russ

Yes, And I am enjoying it, I used to rush things through to get it finished & on to the next,
 but this I am doing things leisurly, adding details while I can still access the interior.
With old age & chronic Fatigue, pacing myself & skipping about from one aspect to another keeps me interested


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 01:24:08 AM
Nobody has said what they think these fittings are for
Anyone?????


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 22, 2012, 01:51:57 AM
Are they gutter clips?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 06:42:28 AM
Are they gutter clips?
no, but a clue is they are two different shapes that work together in matched pairs


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 12:37:55 PM
I am pleased with the results with the clay drain channel,
but I think for an old floor (100 years ) the slate edges would be more packed with floor grot, they are too sharp


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: chester on April 22, 2012, 02:18:40 PM
extension ladder guides maybe?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 22, 2012, 02:20:49 PM
Flitting back to the ladder ( one of them)
Did I use the wrong sort of wood?
I love the grain in Beech, but even at this scale, 1/12th it looks out of place
Wanted a new clean look so varnished it, probably a mistake
My wife says it looks like chipboard!!!!!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 01:06:06 AM
extension ladder guides maybe?

Spot on Chester, bigger ones are the guides,
smaller ones are the stops


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 05:17:47 AM
Ladder painted grey, was probably Govmnt Surplus back in 1950 anyway
now with top fittings fixed


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 05:19:16 AM
And bottom stops


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 05:22:52 AM
and stowed in place on hooks on side passage wall,
high enough to just not catch your head
(Well for a child anyway  ;D )


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 05:24:27 AM
Quite pleased with the way the concrete path turned out


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 23, 2012, 05:51:29 AM
This is turning into a work of art. Keep posting.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 23, 2012, 01:10:39 PM
Another shot, from this angle you can see the path rises towards back of building, about 18 inches between front & back


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 05:40:59 AM
Eric decided it looked too bare, so he put up a rail with some 6" nails to hang stuff on & make the place look more " Lived in "
Pity theres no hook or hole on the grass hook though  ;D


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 05:57:35 AM
He got a bit enthusiastic & soon had more than enough


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 06:01:55 AM
just a few shots


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 06:04:47 AM
into tack room ( horses long gone )
The fire grate is still in the boiler base
but
the copper boiler has long since, corroded/removed/ sent for scrap


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 06:27:08 AM
Looking the other way from the tack room into the (ex- )stable

and from above before floor gets fitted


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: finescalerr on April 24, 2012, 01:27:32 PM
Better and better. -- Russ


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 24, 2012, 04:02:27 PM
I gave the floor slab gaps an application of a thick mix of PVA white / grey acrylic / polyfilla mix & I think its a great improvement as it has definately softened the sharp edges of the slate slabs
An effect that would be difficult to acheive just scribing a full sheet instead of using individual slabs


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Andi Little on April 24, 2012, 04:21:21 PM
Don ................ that does indeed look so much better, and true ........... a scribed sheet just couldn't pull that effect off.

I'm loving the "dressing-up" in the workshop - really quite convincing ................ good job.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 24, 2012, 06:05:34 PM
Stunning. Love your work.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 04:44:11 AM
Thanks guys

In such a small room, 7' x 9', with shelves & bench etc., I have a job getting right light for photography, especially as the building height is about 30 ins
with my fatigue carrying it from upstairs down to the garden is  not on.
To get light in the window I have bodged an extention to the 12" window work bench

old cabinet side clamped to bench

with spare banister rod screwed underneath for support


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 04:47:54 AM
So using the bench extention
this shot was taken facing the window & had to crop it even tho the

blind was down
here you can see the different levels at the end of passage & door

into tack room, there was 2 steps down there.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 05:06:04 AM
Don ................ that does indeed look so much better, and true ........... a scribed sheet just couldn't pull that effect off.

I'm loving the "dressing-up" in the workshop - really quite convincing ................ good job.

Basically the dressing up was an excuse for a quickie photoshoot
Clutter,
 I am in two minds,
if it is all fixed or glued down, nothing will get out of place when moved
BUT
 I do like to take series of pics telling a story,
 which would be easier if it all was removable but that would be a chore,
so maybe middle course, stuff round the edges that would always be there be fixed
 & rest movable,
 so far only the Hay rack, work bench & rail above it & spare wood on end in corner at far end of bench is fixed
for example a load of fire logs rounds has arrived at the doorway ( yet to be modelled!!)
Using the go-cart, & turning the tomato tray seat up the other way, my job was to move the smaller stuff


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 05:19:05 AM
#1  -  Surprising how much you can move!

#2  -  clutter to sides, space clear through middle


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Chuck Doan on April 25, 2012, 08:11:45 AM
Some great clutter and details Don!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:20:26 AM
Thanks Chuck


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:21:47 AM
#1 - So if you got big rounds & no big axe what do ya do
     get a Hammer man instead

#2 - And make a couple of wedges ( thats why they're not rusty yet!!)
     & belt them into a round ( burr on top already evident)


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:24:40 AM
#1 - cut into sizes that will fit the boiler /range/ woodburner/ whatever
#2 - cut some into slabs with small axe


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:26:40 AM
cut slabs into kindling

Base log for chopping on, now well textured


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:53:41 AM
so we got
#1 tree trunk
#2 full, half & quarter rounds


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 10:58:15 AM
#1 Fire ready logs
#2 loads of kindling


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 11:41:42 AM
Now the wood chopping actually all took place in the tack room, but I am waiting for the earth floor to dry before stacking in there

In the late 1970s when I was into road transport, I built several trailer chassis in another stable in another County
One was built to go under a 16ft box trailer
so maybe that will be another little detail project for welding up in the main stable
probably sans wheels ( cost & availability of 1/12th wheels)
I know some RC models are 1/12th scale, but I dont suppose they use 185 14 sized tyres
(the transit size that I used)
Archive pic not very good I'm afraid


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 25, 2012, 04:35:56 PM
Knowing you, the trailer will be knocked up out of plastic strip in about two days!

The whole diorama is looking really good.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 25, 2012, 05:02:33 PM
Knowing you, the trailer will be knocked up out of plastic strip in about two days!

The whole diorama is looking really good.
Dont know about that, probably not got a lot of strip left
 but I will admit to having knocked up a small 3" wide blade trimming axe in brass
and a Sandvik type bowsaw in styrene & wire insulation since tea time
too late for pics now, been a long day


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 01:44:59 AM
Before I get round to pics
 just a quick link

information about AXES, very intresting

http://www.rutlands.co.uk/cgi-bin/psBuyingGuide.cgi?action=showGuideHeader&guide_id=3

Looks like the one I did yesterday was more of a Maul

I remember a mate of mine, who is a tree surgen (& woodsman) saying
dont lend your axe to anyone its blade cutting angle is unique to you, your height, swing etc.
One of my favourite kindling chopping tools was a short handled version of this bush slasher


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 05:21:07 AM
Sandvik type bow saw

basic frame cut out of 60thou black styrene
tubular part made from cooker wire insulation, slit along its length & glued to styrene frame
blade is a junior hacksaw blade


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 05:30:27 AM
#1 - small axe I made came from
#2 - brass terminal/ pin from out of a antisurge multisocket that went "Phut" with a 4mm brass tube  for a handle bent by hand gently & then slightly flattened into an oval


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 05:42:35 AM
General Axes  have a more shaped blade, being wider at cutting edge than at top,
 in my bits drawer found this bit of copper bar 3/4" X 1/4

filed  to shape & drilled whilst still on stock bar

Having problems this morning, first finger & thumb on right hand split open yesterday, due to drying out from use of acrylic paint & PVA glue I think
so typing with middle finger only    ::)
 


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 12:13:32 PM
So, slow progress today
 tree felling axe, copper head, brass handle awaiting finishing


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 03:27:42 PM
axe now in zinc chromate primer

and  bow saw now in green


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 03:32:51 PM
Bow saw in permanent lodging place
earth floor now dry
Not terribly keen with the look of that floor
looks more like small coal bits
or nutty slack as we used to call it

Firewood in its final position in tack room


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 26, 2012, 03:37:34 PM
view that will be seen when this end gable wall is fixed in place


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: finescalerr on April 27, 2012, 02:01:50 AM
It could look worse. -- Russ


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 27, 2012, 03:19:48 PM
It could look worse. -- Russ
And it could look better,
having tried this wall finish for the first time on the interior.
I am hoping to improve the technique when I do the exterior


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 28, 2012, 01:41:09 AM
The axe handles could be improved.
I was very pleased with the way that the brass tube bent to shape in my hands, and gentle tapping the tube flattening it in to an oval, was an improvement,
But, I might try inserting a cocktail stick ( with  a very loose fit) down the bore before bending & ovalling, might maintain a better profile

And I might try trimming back the styrene underframe of the bowsaw, if I can do so without disturbing the glue bond of the covering insulation


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 28, 2012, 02:23:58 AM
I do a miniature enthusiasts newsletter each month and I am always looking for photos of 1:12 scale work. Would I be able to do a write up of your model for the next issue? It has a rather heady circulation of around 85 dedicated dolls modellers here in Brisbane.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 28, 2012, 02:47:41 AM
Ian, you have a PM


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 28, 2012, 06:46:36 AM
#1  bowsaw now with flange removed, great improvement

#2  Mark 1,2, & 3 axes


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 28, 2012, 06:50:32 AM
brass tube with wood insert did not work, wood too soft
so mark 3 axe handle is solid bar, hammered a bit flat on anvil
 & smoothed oval with files etc, much better look & feel & plus got solid end to heel of handle for shaping


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 28, 2012, 03:56:50 PM
Looks like Grandpa's been busy
not finished obviously


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 28, 2012, 04:37:25 PM
I remember using an axe similar to the one in the centre to cut timber when I was a lad. Obviously we lived in a colder climate (England) than I do now (Queensland). Now I almost live in the tropics and the kids ask why would you cut timber to heat the house when all you need to do is push a button on the reverse cycle air conditioning!!!! Maybe I should send them out west past the black stump to the desert country where it gets below freezing in winter to properly explain.

Love the latest photos with all the clutter.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 28, 2012, 08:25:48 PM
The dollhouse under construction is a nice touch that lends a further sense of humanity to the scene.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 29, 2012, 07:16:32 AM
I remember using an axe similar to the one in the centre to cut timber when I was a lad. Obviously we lived in a colder climate (England) than I do now (Queensland). Now I almost live in the tropics and the kids ask why would you cut timber to heat the house when all you need to do is push a button on the reverse cycle air conditioning!!!! Maybe I should send them out west past the black stump to the desert country where it gets below freezing in winter to properly explain.

Love the latest photos with all the clutter.
Well Ian the advantage us older ones, that may have lived through hard times in the past, have, is that we know the wisdom of having a back up plan thats viable.
Whereas some younger ones, when the money to fuel the Air Conditioner runs out, are at a loss at how to manage ( possibly due to the expectation they were brought up with )  We hit a financial bump  a few months ago, & we have tried living at BELOW what we could actually afford in order to practice for when it might get worse, quite a challenge, and you then have a bit in hand to give yourself a treat!!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 29, 2012, 07:21:58 AM
>>     ""Looks like Grandpa's been busy""

he sure has


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 29, 2012, 07:24:48 AM
This little house is harder to do than the other one
its 1/12 scale in 1/12th scale
or 1:144


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 29, 2012, 07:45:21 AM
The windows could prove difficult to do

but then again if I do a model of
1/12 of 1/12 of 1/12
that would be 1:1728
or in other words the longest dimension of that model would be just 0.1666 inches or aprox 4.23 mm

would be no problems with the windows there then,   :D 
just a full stop would do,
a square one of course     ;D  8)


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on April 29, 2012, 04:42:19 PM
This is bringing back memories of my childhood when we (I have two sisters) used to play in the shed/garage with our father's 'stuff'. We were never officially allowed to touch his 'stuff' of course! He was a bricklayer so he had all sorts of interesting things including full bottles (not plastic containers) of hydrochloric acid etc to clean his tools. Wonderful to explore - you were always well aware of the dangerous nature of sharp edges and bottles of mysterious liquids! All of the sheds had dirt floors and endless spiders.

How are you going to model the spiders then, Don?


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: marc_reusser on April 29, 2012, 09:35:49 PM
Just lovely. Great fun watching this come together, and how you are scratbuilding/creating all the various details and bits.  thanks.

Marc


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: michael mott on April 30, 2012, 09:15:10 AM
Hi Don, checking in again, absolutely wonderful sense of reality coming through. The axes are a trick subject for sure, I use my full size splitting axe all the time, it needs a new handle, because it is getting a bit butchered at the intersection of the head and the handle. Have you thought about adding an old worn axe with a handle prepared from a bamboo skewer?

I really liked the shot in the wood storage area. and the soap box cart, scraped a few knees in my youth on one of those.

Quote
We hit a financial bump  a few months ago, & we have tried living at BELOW what we could actually afford in order to practice for when it might get worse,

Wise for sure, I just had to turn off the propane to the house heating system last week to conserve enough for the domestic hot water. The sun and the wood stove are all we are using now for heat. and the sun is doing a great job during the day. wood stove and good insulation a great job in the evening and over night.

The lake is still covered in Ice! and it is may tomorrow.

Michael





Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 30, 2012, 11:19:18 AM
This is bringing back memories of my childhood when we (I have two sisters) used to play in the shed/garage with our father's 'stuff'. We were never officially allowed to touch his 'stuff' of course! He was a bricklayer so he had all sorts of interesting things including full bottles (not plastic containers) of hydrochloric acid etc to clean his tools. Wonderful to explore - you were always well aware of the dangerous nature of sharp edges and bottles of mysterious liquids! All of the sheds had dirt floors and endless spiders.

How are you going to model the spiders then, Don?
A young friends daughter (2 1/2 )is mad on this one
Woolly & Tig   http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/woolly-and-tig/
could be big enough to model    ;D  
EDIT;-
 Actually when we were into dollshouse retailing, there was someone who did cobwebs in 1/12 in etched brass
EDIT 2;-
or DIY
http://www.ehow.com/how_2093321_make-spider-webs-dollhouse.html




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 30, 2012, 11:30:32 AM
Mark, thanks for watching!!
Michael,   You asked  Have you thought about adding an old worn axe with a handle prepared from a bamboo skewer?
did you mean as in blade chipped from hitting stone instead of wood,
and with a straight, quick replacement emergency handle when no shaped hickory one available? plus the back of the head burred from use as a sledge
Now there's a thought
funnily enough the mark 3 axe had a notch in the blade from the stock bar & I ground it out!!
On the grounds that it was bad workmanship or misuse of a tool

But then I remembered that once when I could not hire gas cutting gear, I bought an axe ESPECIALLY to cut the steel body off a van chassis so I could use the chassis as the base for a trailer build, like a giant tin opener.
Still got two scars on my right forearm to prove it!!!
Didnt hurt the axe though!!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on April 30, 2012, 02:09:39 PM
OK, what do you recon Michael?
Abused enough?
Shaft damaged, used to get that a lot on sledge hammer handles when breaking up cast iron objects,
blade edge chipped ( may have over done that bit)
Now, as this axe is made up from 4 layers of 60 thou styrene laminated,
I could not quite see how to get a burr on the back of the axe head
whereas with using brass or steel you can beat the burr in naturally


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: michael mott on April 30, 2012, 06:56:23 PM
Hi Don, My own personal opinion is that the handle looks great, one would need to the the "Hulk" to create such large notches in the metal of the head though. you could just file that down a little because that is of course how we sharpen the head.

Cheers Michael


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 01, 2012, 12:24:10 PM
Been out most of the day, shopping etc, but before we went I had a go at doing a window for the little stable cott.
Took some double sided tape, stuck it to a base of cereal box card afixed some microstrtip to it to form a rectangle larger than the window opening, & mounting a piece of 60 thou clear acrylic, the size of the window opening on to it with solvent, lifted it off the tape, trimmed the strip, turned it over refixed to tape & stuck two very thin microstrips across to form the panes

not sure, looks a little clunky,
although the windows are less than 10mm x 10mm
oh, but it does have a window cill   ;D


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 01, 2012, 02:10:54 PM
filed down blade a bit


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 02, 2012, 07:49:10 AM
The Humbrol tin is almost scale for a 10 litre paint bucket! Just change the name?
Oh, much simpler than that Ian, got one somewhere that has the big print, name, obscured with paint runs & only the small print details left showing!!

Love it when things transfer straight accross from real to scale
Ah, found it, an old Airfix paint pot thats thinner & taller with the brand obliterated but small print left


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 02, 2012, 07:52:04 AM
Some 60 thou styrene sheet, plus some styrene tube.
Plus some card tube .  . .
and


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 02, 2012, 02:08:10 PM
A chunk of balsa,
a brass pin,
a small nut,

drill a few holes


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 05, 2012, 02:57:47 PM
Take a length of Hornby 00 track feed wire
plus a larger diameter piece of wire insulation


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 05, 2012, 02:58:55 PM
Marry the 2 together
 times 4


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 05, 2012, 04:04:34 PM
Add various sizes of styrene tube,
plus a brass bezel from a ship fitting
glue & paint


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 05, 2012, 04:11:08 PM
fit into block,
at first it did not look right
& then I realised normally the distributor seems further down when the cylinder head & the rocker cover are in place
probably adds another 9-10 ins to the height
down the right side are the studs to hold the petrol pump
still a work in progress,
pics show the need for tydying up joints & faces plus more details


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Malachi Constant on May 06, 2012, 12:41:22 PM
Neat!  I like the approach to building the open cylinder block.  -- Dallas


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 07, 2012, 03:26:03 AM
Neat!  I like the approach to building the open cylinder block.  -- Dallas
Thanks, yes much easier & neater than drilling holes in a solid ( well, with my resources)

I found this enlightening

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LauE0W2UZe4

( Simplified explanation!!!!! )
Build sand castles, group them together & pour molten metal around them


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on May 07, 2012, 05:43:39 AM
Don, neat........ But and you will hate me for this, you need 5 leads for the distributor, 4 to the plugs and 1 HT lead to coil


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 07, 2012, 07:11:30 AM
Don, neat........ But and you will hate me for this, you need 5 leads for the distributor, 4 to the plugs and 1 HT lead to coil
Not at all Gordon, there is also the LT lead, and the disc on the side, Diapragm?? adjuster?
I was vaguely trying to do an engine for an Austin A35, but the sump is a different shape, and the distributor cap on that had the HT leads coming out sideways,
I think going from memory the one I did was more like the Ford transit ones, that I had many more years experience with, having driven them from the very first pickup they made
This may end up under the bench as clutter as a generic anonymous breed!!
At least I have learnt something along the way, enjoyably so.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on May 08, 2012, 01:40:56 PM
Coil- distibutor lead added, plus plug tops on end of leads, you can just see the LT lead coiled up, surface joints filled & painted, needs weathering, could really do with more casting webs etc, & disributor needs finishing


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 03:05:56 AM
After a "summer" of inside modelling inactivity, I finally got back to the Cornish Stable. As mentioned previously I want to maintain easy access to the ground floor for scene setting/ workshop photo shoots, but because the upper floor( 1st floor UK speak) has the floor beams exposed with no ceiling below it, could not see how to acheive that as it would not slide into position, but more about that later.

Joists in place in slots cut in top of support wall



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 03:16:23 AM
So I first concentrated on laying the floorboards, 

#1 boards for comparison as cut on table saw, and after a wash with very dilute acrylic black with a touch of red brown earth


#2 which when turned over gave this effect from creepage, but this will add variation when the top side is washed with a touch more brown in it


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 03:28:08 AM
After gluing in place & lightly sanding, with 144th scale stable for comparison

initially cutting some to normally usable lengths as individual planks, the chippy using up all usable offcuts, this was an economy build originally.

So economy, that when someone cut two planks too thin
( thinner than two thick planks, obviously  ;D )
 they too got pressed into use


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 03:42:36 AM
With some of the floorboards glued in place the whole floor could be lifted out of the main building, & the end INTERIOR gable wall fitted in place being glued to a fillet of wood ripped out of a piece of unused parquet flooring that I had had kept back for 42 years, well seasoned, a very dark red/brown colour, the gable being a lamination of hardboard & strong card from a jigsaw puzzle box

then back into place to align window openings in back walls, inside being wider than outside to acheive splayed angle for max light entry


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 04:06:12 AM
#1   Back wall with strip framing, & window fabricated out of ex dolls house mullions ( glazing bars) with outside frame cut out of surplus doorframe, dolls house again,

#2 close up of framing  to save cutting a wider piece for the angle, I chose to use pieces of all same width, skin of inside wall would cover it.

#3 framing on ouside of inside wall, joints very casual butt ones, jigsaw puzzle box card again, must be nearly 2mm thick


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 04:14:48 AM
#1 gluing inside skin of INSIDE wall into place
you are keeping up arent you?  :D

#2 card filler for inside window wall seat?

#3  and in place



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 04:29:06 AM
#1  while giving a coat of colour to walls, my clumsy fingers eliminated a glazing bar   ::)
  so now that changes the buildings history, but more later

#2  fitting side trims to outside of OUTSIDE wall on main stucture
 and window cill ( cill in styrene as wood might split with rough handling)

#3  Stone lintel over this window needs altering, which will get done when final outside finish is applied here, which will also cover wood side trims to simulate stone



Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 06, 2012, 04:39:14 AM
#1 rest of boards now laid, these I only cut part through to simulate the end on joints

#2 nail holes impressed with a tool fashioned out of a jewellers screwdriver ground into a V shape as floor would have been nailed originally with cut nails as opposed to round heads, and a thin black wash applied to colour in holes

#3 barely noticeable from a distance, but that is the effect I wanted


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 06, 2012, 12:27:51 PM
Looking good!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: artizen on October 06, 2012, 04:47:10 PM
Glad to see this one is back.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 07, 2012, 11:45:17 AM
I mentioned the unfortunate event with the broken window frame.  I usually try to make advantage of such miss-hapenings.
In this case, the scenario is as follows.
When the stable was built the upstairs was for storage of fodder & the stableboy/groom/mine apprentice's accomodation. As such he would rarely be using the upstairs in the middle part of the day, so it was felt by his master that ventilation by having opening windows, was a luxury not befitting his station, when needed ventilation would be acheived by opening the door to the steps. But that was some hundred & fifty years ago, somewhere in between then & now  an opening part was made to fit in the space of 2 panes to improve ventilation for those with greater expectations.

In the model this was done by using styrene 3mm square bar to fabricate the opening, this was exactly the same size as the original glazing bars.





Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 07, 2012, 11:50:46 AM
I used mainly 3mm solid square bar, but had a bit of 3mm hollow square styrene that I used for the hinge stave, thus a bit of copper cooker wire could be used as the hinge.
All I have to do now is work out how to drill the main frame in that short space & keep the hole vertical





Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 07, 2012, 11:58:10 AM
I mentioned that I could not slide the upper floor out, as you can see the slots that the floor joists fit into preclude that, also the floor extends to the side in behind the main carcase corner fillets. So it has to slide out upwards, that of course raises another challenge, as I want to have the roof with all its beams & rafters as a separate unit

Edit, although that front floor joist is not prototypical, being close up to where the front wall will be, it is neccessary for structural integrity of the main carcase


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 08, 2012, 01:56:01 AM
Similarly the larger (bottom) of the two apex beams is neccessary to maintain shape of gables, the top smaller "beam" will be the apex of the removable roof unit.

you may also notice the gap between the upper & lower modules to represent the thickness of the stone wall, without adding too much weight, which would be the case with a solid wall in this scale


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: finescalerr on October 08, 2012, 02:11:31 AM
This has turned into a fairly complex model, hasn't it? -- Russ


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 08, 2012, 02:48:08 AM
The challenges involved make it all the more interesting.

I always take more pics than I need, scanning through I found this one that epitomises what I remember as a kid, the lack of window & light is just as it was


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 08, 2012, 05:49:54 AM
By using a pin drill, I managed to make two holes for the hinge pins,

I then realised that one piece of wire would be too long to feed in from top end without kinking, so had to resort to two separate bits

#1  shown here dry run.

 this gave a problem with the top pin, if I put it in from the top it might just drop straight down inside frame, and if I laid it on its side instead I might still have a problem with the super glue wicking into the hinge joint & the whole lot seizing up
so I formed a crook in the end of the pin so as to have it locate into a side hole in the main window frame

#2 close up of top pin ( which kills two birds with one stone as the mullion to frame butt joint here is a bit weak or poor workmanship!)


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 08, 2012, 06:05:20 AM
So bottom pin was glued in place & allowed to dry thoroughly, then casement placed & top crooked pin inserted & carefully one drop of super glue in the hole to locate the crook securely

#1  open window

#2  Now with working window catch

MUST REMEMBER to close window BEFORE lifting top floor section out or opening casement will get ripped off   :-[

Edit; may replace that window catch, looks a little coarse


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 08, 2012, 01:21:02 PM
#1 new shape window catch, you see the shape better while still in copper

#2 & painted black

#3 Tried to 'tool' the floor joists to show ancient, more rustic timber
dont think I have quite achieved what I had in mind


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 10, 2012, 04:42:27 AM
Started on the floor section in the far back corner by the brick chimney.
Interesting exercise, includes trapdoor & shaping around chimney stack to carry joists


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 10, 2012, 06:40:23 AM
Idly playing with camera after debris from working built up on model


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 14, 2012, 01:45:12 PM
#1   View of floor sub unit from underneath

#2  sub unit in place,
 bow saw permanantly fixed to wall,

was also going to have this section removable, but decided it was not neccessary
will make it easier to place removable roof unit


loft ladder made up but not yet fixed




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 19, 2012, 03:01:32 PM
Not been feeling well last couple of days, in fact I slept for 14 hours last night!!
But some slow progress has been made on the raftering

#1   Barge boards had to be in place this early on, as the roof will be removable & they help keep the shape & give strength

#2   Valley base probably not quite prototypical, but is below the level of the rafters & there is still the battens to add to enhance the difference

#3   View from inside, some of the beams will stay with the top floor unit for its structural strength, some will be a part of the roof structure, which would otherwise be flimsy


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 19, 2012, 03:04:29 PM
Cant quite make my mind up wether in 1860 the Cornish would have used lead or zinc sheet for the valley, dont suppose it would make much difference on the model, except maybe for sheet size


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 22, 2012, 11:09:57 AM
I have experienced roof damage on models in the past when having the slates overhang fascias as here in the workshop roof,

Edit; apologies for the dust!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 22, 2012, 11:15:47 AM
So on this model I sought to avoid this happening by giving a solid base to the bottom edge by using black styrene sheet strip notched to give effect of individual slates as only the ends will  be visible, sufficient to be visible from below with the 2 inch over hang, but when, if, I fit a gutter very little will be seen of it




Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 25, 2012, 04:47:07 AM
# 1 Lead lining in valley, from old hanging file pockets, good quality, fine card.

# 2 Battens also fixed

# 3 as I calculated that there would be 600 glue points on the batten to rafter joint, so decided it would be quicker to use card spacers between battens rather than mark out & glue to pencil marks


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 30, 2012, 06:54:31 AM
Progress has been slow, I think that putting up real slates, with nails is much easier than gluing scale ones that move when you turn your back, at least they stay where you put them!!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 30, 2012, 07:14:10 AM
valley detail
and texture/finish of slates
.75mm card stock used for slates,
acrylic black with a touch of red in different proportions to give variety in colour
then card cut to size & fixed which gave a white edge that was coloued with a black/ green acrylic along edges to soak in & then wiped off surplus before drying.
which left a under shadow along bottom edges of slates
Then sealed with a water resistant PVA slightly diluted
another edge treatment with black/green.
I found that the PVA had not thourougly dried after 3-4 hours and that wiping clean along the line of slates left a faint smear texture that looked wrong.
So damp cloth & immediately finished off wiping down the roof which although is a minimal texture definately looks much better

Incidently I have avoided the broken slate syndrome on this part of the roof, reasoning that I would probably overdo it!
result,  a raggedy type roof
Suppose I could fit a few slates with repair tags bent up over bottom edges  



Must try & get some daylight pictures


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 30, 2012, 12:49:19 PM
Looks good!


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: finescalerr on October 30, 2012, 01:44:08 PM
Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: Andi Little on October 31, 2012, 02:02:33 AM
Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ

(Muffled guffaw) - Very true. But which is of course a back handed compliment if ever I heard one: thoroughly well deserved of course.

Well done - great job - most excellent fortitude.


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 31, 2012, 04:32:33 AM
Why not just build it 1:1? it wouldn't be any more work and would look the same. -- Russ

Yeah, but, 
I doubt if card stock, even treated would be very long lasting on a 1:1 building  ;D   :'(

Real roofing is easier,
been there done that, got the T shirt, AND the "granny's blessings"
On a full size roof  all the materials & procedures are already accepted practice
But adapting different mediums to portray the 'real' world when modelling  is much more difficult

The only easier bit is that the physical energy to lift the model slates up on to the roof is far less than on a real roof!!

The other observation to be made, from when we were into dolls house retail was that very often a model, say for example a wheelbarrow could be more expensive in model form than in full size


And thanks for the complment


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on October 31, 2012, 04:56:53 AM
Thanks Ray & Andi for the encouragement
The value of forums like this is not to compare my efforts to others on here, or I would be completly deflated, but to improve slowly & learn from others experience & ideas
Which I sometimes acheive, and sometimes dont   ;D


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on November 02, 2012, 07:12:36 AM
One thing not to overlook when cutting your own slates, is the need for exact sizes
having only a cheap bog standard cutter I finally acheived it with a rustic fence clamped to the same base that the cutter was clamped too


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on November 02, 2012, 07:16:23 AM
couldn't resist, was cleaning out debris prior to paying attention to interior wall finish with a 3/4" paint brush, thought, looks like someone has been interupted while brushing up


Title: Re: 19th Century Cornish Stable
Post by: granitechops on November 02, 2012, 07:23:46 AM
Made further progress with rest of roof and done first step of "weathering" the valley gutter
acheived by first brush applying a dirt colour acrylic, allowing 30 seconds drying time & then running a small amount of water down through as in real life to wash some of it away
Looks like the lead  joints need a bit of under shadow to dry on thoroughly first