Westlake Publishing Forums

General Category => Painting & Weathering Techniques => Topic started by: Gordon Ferguson on June 06, 2011, 02:38:52 PM



Title: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on June 06, 2011, 02:38:52 PM
OK going to give this its own little thread, mostly because I would be grateful for any help /advice anybody want to throw at me before I paint the little beast.

As a reminder here are a couple of shots of the real life version.

 (http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee275/gfadvance/135%20road%20roller/3391329313_156449bf5e_b-1.jpg)

(http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee275/gfadvance/135%20road%20roller/3392141350_4e85ec41d9_b.jpg)

I have a reasonable idea of how I want to approach the painting, but it may not be right so tell me! One area I am still considering is how to do the "peeled paint" that is apparent - have considered using Per Olav's technique of using bare metal foil, also thought of using rubber cement as a mask but again anybody got a better idea.

OK here is the process I think I should go through:-

 Painting process;-

Paint will be Tamiya for all the basic air brushing with Vallejo used for most of the hand brushing.

•   Apply undercoat of matt black.
 
All of the subsequent air brush steps, paint applied at a downward angle to leave areas in shadow still dominated by a black /dark shade.

All shades of colour to be at least 2 tones lighter at this stage to allow for subsequent darkening following weather procedures.

•   Air brush on various rust tones.
•   Sponge on, very lightly rust high lights, oranges, yellows & reds.
•   Apply salt, sparingly to model, being aware of different real life materials and their different rust characteristics.
•   Apply first top coat colour.
•   Apply 2 mist coats of hair spray.
•   Apply second and different top colour coat, then lighten same colour and apply on top/horizontal surfaces to simulate fading.
•   Brush off salt, softening individual panels with water if required.
•   Again working on individual panels soften top coat and remove to show original colour and/ or rust areas.
•   Review rust/wear areas and adjust look by brush work.
•   Apply by small brush/sponge any chipping required using a very dark grey.

Further additions;

•   Use rust powders to highlight/texture larger area of rust.
•   Apply dark brown/black tint to area where oil staining apparent.
•   Pin wash to bring out details
•   Use Gouache water colours to apply rust, rain stains etc.
•   Apply dark grey colour followed by graphite dust on a few areas where wear not rust is apparent.

Specific procedure for this model; outside surfaces of roller wheels

•   Spray dark grey.
•   Apply variety of rust colours.
•   Buff rust surface with soft cotton cloth to work up surface sheen.
•   Buff with graphite dust on to main surfaces and edges of wheels.

Clocks ticking I need to finish this by end of month so don't me let go down a blind alley and make a right pigs ear of this .

Thanks   




Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: marc_reusser on June 06, 2011, 03:00:41 PM
Sounds pretty good. It's good to see that you will me treating wheels and rollers with different approaches. I would make some changes and adjustments in approach to both parts, but I need sit and write them out and post them a bit later today or tomorrow.

Main thing I could see is throw in step or two of Hairspray chipping as well.  I would definitely go with HS chipping for the paint layers in the roller sides.



Marc


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: marc_reusser on June 06, 2011, 04:50:52 PM
Pulled these out of my file...dont know if you have them as well, as they may help with the painting.
(These are reduced....full size multi MB originals on way in email to you)


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: marc_reusser on June 06, 2011, 04:51:37 PM
Rear Shot


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: marc_reusser on June 06, 2011, 04:52:13 PM
Front Shot


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: marc_reusser on June 08, 2011, 03:14:31 AM
FWIW, here are some things/approaches I would consider ..and they seem pretty sim to your described approach:

BODY/CHASSIS:

1.)  I think unless doing full-on CM, I don’t think you need the extra layer of black paint over the primer. I would go straight to a ‘dark black/brown rust’ for an overall base coat, then come in and do spot, fade, and highlight coats with 2 lighter/different rust colors…..for these two coats I would employ the salt technique (and possibly some vertical streaking  or pooling areas…these latter two would really depend on how I feel at the time about how it is developing).  [You could also do the above sequence in reverse spotty 2 color lighter rust base colors, salt, darker rust color; which will give you a different effect/feel.]

2.)  Seal rust color with a satin or matte clear coat (I prefer use matte….but some people have issues with the subsequent HS (hairspray) technique when using matte, as it makes it harder to remove.

3.)  Apply 2-3 coats of hairspray. (airbrush or aerosol can). Some people apply more as it makes it easier to remove for them, but I feel I have less control of the chipping when I do this). Remember also, the longer the HS stays on after paint, the harder it gets to remove.

4.) Now here is where it comes down to preference, desired finish, and comfort level with the approach/techniques/tools….as there are a couple of different ways to go….and/or maybe even combine parts of them….so it’s sort of a-la-carte ….but here are two based on the photos.

First some things to remember when doing the HS:

Generally ‘Tamiya’ will tend to give you the smallest chips, ‘Life-Color’ and ‘Games Workshop’ second, and ‘Vallejo’ tends to come off in the largest pieces. (this seems to be primarily due to the makeup of the paint).

The thinner the color coat, the smaller and more controllable the chips, and the easier to remove/chip.

When chipping don’t wet too large an area..try to work in controllable sections/areas


a.)  Spray on desired green color in the general areas you want it to show through the blue; carefully apply salt in areas you want the green colr to show through the blue (you don’t want to activate the HS when dampening for the salt  to stick); apply the blue color; remove salt; do any CM  and panel fading using the AB. (the panel fading is a bit harder to do if you do the two colors/shades like your chassis has, with this approach…..but it is still doable.) This is followed by the HS chipping .  
  
After chipping  apply any:
“mapping”
additional painted on chips, scratches, etc., using a brush and/or fine sponge,
“positive  chipping”

b.)  Spray on desired green color and do any CM  and panel fading using the AB….then “chip” this layer. Let dry a day or so.
Spray on clear sealer coat, and when dry, apply HS coats.
Spray on desired blue color and do any CM  and panel fading using the AB….then “chip” this layer.

After chipping  apply any:
“mapping”
additional painted on chips, scratches, etc., using a brush and/or fine sponge,
“positive  chipping”

….and from here one then needs to decide what weathering steps/techniques to take and apply.

I will post some more, and the approach to the rollers shortly.

HTH

Marc


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: Malachi Constant on June 08, 2011, 06:58:45 AM
Thanks to both Gordon and Marc for sharing their exchange on this project here ... following along with great interest!  -- Dallas


Title: Re: Road Roller Painting ?
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on June 08, 2011, 07:08:01 AM
Thanks Marc for taking the time to provide such a comprehensive reply.

Need to study your reply and have a think about some of the choices you outlined ........... in fact I probable will do a couple of test shots on some old kits  to ensure I fully understand what the final effect is for each of the options.

Look forward to seeing your thoughts on the roller wheels ......... you may remember the  1/24 roller (still sitting on shelf unfinished :() and my attempts on the wheels on that one.

Dallas .......... don't get to excited remember this is all, well in my case , theoretical at the moment