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General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: jacq01 on March 26, 2011, 08:51:48 AM



Title: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on March 26, 2011, 08:51:48 AM
  

  The psychological effect of my hand problems was far larger than anticipated.  Together with an unexplained loss of muscle power it had an enormous negative impact on my daily life, including my modeling pleasure. The investigation results however turned out ok, no viral/bacterial or neurological cause, but the reason is still not known. Now with 2-3 sessions physiotherapy per week the negative trend is reversed and muscle mass is returning.  Together with the showing signs of spring, enjoying things is slowly returning.

 Now that the sawmill diorama layout needs discipline to finish the last ideas, I wondered : What's next?

 Marc, Nick, Bernard and Per Olaf showed some intriguing 1:35 work and I became interested.
 But what ?  Purpose, subject, railway and presentation are important items.
 For already a very long time I have been looking at the painting "Die Erftmühle" by Andreas Achenbach, a german painter from the 19th century.

 (http://images107.fotki.com/v67/photos/7/1437817/9438439/erftmuehlelayout-vi.jpg)

 That was it !!
 I have challenged myself to built this building complex based on traditional "fachwerk" building techniques in 1:35 with single bricks, tiles, etc.
 The biggest challenge will be to create a believable concept including a 600mm "Feldbahn" with a realistic matching amount of rolling stock and traction.
 Another target is to built the diorama on 2 modules of 1200x700x700 mm.

 Jacq  

  


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on March 26, 2011, 09:04:35 AM

   
Quote
Marc, Nick, Bernard and Per Olaf showed some intriguing 1:35 work and I became interested.

     Jeez,  I forgot Dallas  ;)

     Jacq


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: DaKra on March 26, 2011, 09:19:35 AM
Beautiful scene, caught my eye too when I saw it online a while back.  I have a larger format photo of the same painting downloaded in my landscape reference file. 

Here's a thought-- why not build the scene as a stand alone piece?  Work of your level does not need a model train to justify its existence, and the train might detract from it.   

Dave


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Frederic Testard on March 26, 2011, 10:14:49 AM
I share Dave's opinion about the subject. It was made in 19th century, and the model could be that of a 19th century scene.


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: TRAINS1941 on March 26, 2011, 10:27:00 AM
Jacq

Glad to hear the hand is improving.

Excellent subject for you to do.  I think their right you really don't need a train in the picture with your modeling skills it would be just fine as is.
Looking forward to the 1st pictures of progress.

Jerry


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on March 26, 2011, 12:07:39 PM

 
Quote
why not build the scene as a stand alone piece?

  Dave,

  I agree, but than it is not a real challenge ( at least not for me)
  To integrate the feldbahn in such a way that , when there is no train, it is not noticable and when a small train is visible you only notice it because of the movement,  it fits right in. 

  To work out such a contradiction is the challenge.  Construction of the diorama is a matter of finding solutions for all questions that pop up, stick to the decisions and built with innovation and persistance.

   Jacq


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Ray Dunakin on March 26, 2011, 01:26:26 PM
That's a beautiful scene and an excellent choice for a diorama!

I'm glad to hear that the hand is finally improving and I wish you a full and speedy recovery.


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: finescalerr on March 26, 2011, 01:48:56 PM
In today's culture, such a painting would be considered "old fashioned" and maybe not really art. After all, we have cameras for those who prefer realism. Instead, the art world wants to see someone's impression of that scene.

Since my thoughts about today's culture are unsuitable for print, I would encourage Jacq to recreate that scene in three dimensions -- with or without the tram -- and to call it a sculpture. Should anyone question the inclusion of the tram, why that is simply Jacq's impression of the painting, thus proving his sculpture is, indeed, art!

Russ


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: shropshire lad on March 26, 2011, 01:53:21 PM
Jacq ,

   Brilliant . I really look forward to seeing you completely lose like I have and start constructing buildings one brick and tile at a time .

  I remember you posting this picture some time ago and thought then that it would make a fantastic model , with or without a train track near it . There is no reason why you can't incorporate it into a layout , but it would also make a fine stand alone model .

  To help you kick start your project here is a shot of the building I am presently having a go at modelling . It has not had much progress for some months but when you get going with your maybe that'll kick start mine back into action.

   Nick


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: artizen on March 26, 2011, 04:25:10 PM
Good luck to both of you on your brick building exercises! (Says he who has now got to make more bricks because the paved floors of The Steamy Pudding Hotel and Café took my last few bricks - only 13,000 so far and counting.)


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Malachi Constant on March 26, 2011, 06:24:11 PM
Hi Jacq --

It'll be fun to watch you dive into the world of 1:35 scale and crazy rulers!  I like the scene with or without a train ... personally, I can easily imagine this whole scene as a rich, 3-d backdrop for a simple little line running almost straight across the front of the picture and crossing the stream on a little wooden trestle.  (Not quite straight, of course, maybe just a very gentle sweeping curve to the rail line.)

And, of course, very glad to hear that your getting some improvement with your hands ... that certainly helps.

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: finescalerr on March 27, 2011, 01:52:09 AM
I'm curious about something and we may have discussed this before: Is there very much railroad related stuff in 1:35, European or whatever? It would seem its advantage is using crossover items from military modeling.

While I consider them essentially the same scale, my personal preference is for 1:32 because I can use On3 standards for finescale American prototype two foot gauge. Some kind of industrial switching diorama in that scale and gauge will be my "retirement project".

Russ


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: shropshire lad on March 27, 2011, 03:01:35 AM
Russ ,

   From what I have observed there are an increasing amount of railway related products being released in 1/35th scale but most of them are WWII German standard gauge , purely with dioramas in mind as nothing is produced to run . Although I'm sure it is perfectly possible to make them run . Being a narrow gauger much of what is produced is of no interest to me , but there is a certain amount that could be used . For instance , a standard gauge boxcar ( or whatever the German equivalent is called) could be used either on a siding or put on blocks to become a storage shed but most of the locos are huge and would swamp any 600mm gauge loco you might have .
   To my knowledge there are very few manufacturers making narrow gauge locos and even fewer who make them to run , in fact the list comprises of one name , our very own Bernard Snoodyk . The problem with Bernard is that he has a day job and that day job is very demanding so his ability to produce goodies for us is severely limited . It is for that reason that I have been trying to get him to retire for some time so that he can get around to building the Decauville locos has said he'll build for Jacq and I ! ( Now that would look good tootling passed a watermill with a few skip wagons in tow ) .  So really this is still a scale for scratchbuilders who model European scenes but one that is well supported in the accessory department by military modelling manufacturers .

   I see 1/32nd scale as an American and , to a certain extent , British scale which has alot less support from manufacturers.

    Nick


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on March 27, 2011, 05:50:02 AM

   
Quote
I can easily imagine this whole scene as a rich, 3-d backdrop for a simple little line running almost straight across the front of the picture and crossing the stream on a little wooden trestle.  (Not quite straight, of course, maybe just a very gentle sweeping curve to the rail line.)

    That is the whole idea, a very simple unobstrusive little line out of the woods on the left, across the stream towards a little landing on the right where the stream joins a small river. From there the line dissappears in the woods along the river /hill side. This way a continuous loop is possible with the storage underneath the hill, accessible from the back, which will fill the complete scene from left to right. Very basic with no more structures than shown in the painting, some clearings, cattle, some figures and the woods.
  I intend to curve the diorama so left and right cannot be seen from a single view point.
  Traction to be mainly steam ( 19th century) like Decauville , O&K, Krauss, scratchbuilt as the only available rtr loco is the Decauville  by Bernard.
  Track will be along Marc's idea's but adapted to the 19th century practice.
   
  This is the basic starting idea, which slowly will evolve into a final plan by the time all concept and technical questions are solved in a satisfactory way.

  One of the problems I have is determining the approx. dimensions of the buildings.  How do I transfer the 2D impression into a 3D plan with length, width and height.
  I have tried my luck with Google sketchup but got lost. I am one of the old school who learned to draw with pencil, square and rubber.... ;)
  At the moment I am preparing manually a perspective lines sheet to determine the main properties, based on a height of 2,40m of the brick corner from the plasterwork to the eaves.
  Tedious work as the painter worked with various vanishing points. Luckily he used one horizon   ;) ;D 
  Suggestions are welcome.  ;D ;D

  The people of the Museum Kunst Palast in Düsseldorf are very interested and I have been invited to the new exhibition in September with paintings of the Düsseldorfer Malersschule.
  An earlier private viewing is not possible due to reconstruction work in the museum.

  Jacq

  PS
 Ian, you have any visible results?  I can't find photo's of your work on your website.   I have seen Nick's work in Warley and I was hooked. All references are welcome.


 
   


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: artizen on March 27, 2011, 06:23:48 AM
Jacq - thanks for assuming that The Steamy Pudding is being built to some sort of standard!!! I used a runny mix of plaster to mortar the brickwork on my tunnel portal this afternoon and stuffed it up because the mortar was more water than runny and swelled the cardboard mortar courses I use to space the bricks. Ho hum, I lost 13 bricks off the parapet. Managed to retrieve 11 - I saw one floating to the bottom of the swimming pool so no point chasing it. As soon as I have a satisfactory answer to the mortar technique I will post photos on my site. I will change my technique from working franticly with runny mixes and trying to cover too much at once to a new technique of working really slowly using my fingers and a stiff mix. Seems to reduce the incidence of air bubbles between the bricks and it 'works' better with less waste.

My work is not good enough for this forum. I only lurk on here to go oooh and aaah and learn stuff. One thing I have learned from five months of building with individual bricks - it is far better to go the extra little effort and make your own moulds for making bricks so that you can crank them out by the thousand as you need them in any colour and to some extent even change the texture etc. It appears that using casting plaster with cement oxides is extremely cheap as well as being incredibly robust. The results will stand up to being outside and using rigid PVC foamboard for a base means that it never swells, rots, warps or is affected by sunlight or water. If you are using a technique for mortar courses, let us all know as that is the achilles heel on my models so far. I have to have something ready for the Australian Narrow Gauge Convention at Easter so I am starting to stress now!


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: shropshire lad on March 27, 2011, 12:41:43 PM
Ian,

    I use HO 6x1 or 8x1 stripwood for my mortar courses , and then runny plaster for the mortar .

   I have also made a mold of a panel of brickwork that I constructed so that I can cast off loads of brick panels. This makes the job of covering a large area of straight brickwork quicker and easier . It just gets a bit tricky at the corners .

   Jacq ,

  I believe someone is producing a 1/35th Krauss in Australia ( not Bernard)but I can't be sure .

   If I were building your layout I would set it either just before WW1 or between the wars because all of the locos you mention would have been used.

   Quite frankly if I were you I wouldn't try and copy the buildings in the painting to accurately but just use them as a starting point and just try and capture the atmosphere of the scene . But then again you're not me and you like to do the job properly !

Nick


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: danpickard on March 27, 2011, 02:13:18 PM
G'Day Jacq,
I do recall when you first showed this image some time ago, so am pleased to see it surfaced again and on the plans table.  The introduction of a small rail inclsuion should be very feasible, with just a short and simple sort of farming tramway style thingy.  Very unobtrusive until the little loco does a lap, and yes, very adaptable scene to the small line running left to right across the "diorama/layout", out of the woods, across the stream, through a shallow cutting in the hill side, with a siding back to the mill sheds maybe.

It was Inscale Models (South Africa, but with an Australian homebase as well) that had worked on the 1/35 Krauss, but I'd almost get the feeling that would be too big a loco for the scene as I could picture it.  I see something like a little Simplex and a string of rugga skips in tow as about the right size for the picture.  As far as I know, Inscale didn't have any commercial plans at present for that loco, but I have heard some rumours that they may be heading towards RTR brass items as opposed to kits in the future (not sure how truthful that one is though).

Anyway, great to hear the hand is not dulling the enthusiasm too much (the unfortunate downside of those nerve type issues, is recovery is a bit slow and frustrating!).  I certainly look forward to seeing how this new adventure develops.

Cheers,
Dan



Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: artizen on March 27, 2011, 04:13:56 PM
Jacq I agree with Dan - the scene would probably look better set in the early 1920s or 1930s so you can have something still in steam. Maybe a small rural style metre gauge line? Otherwise a narrow gauge industrial line?

Nick - I read your thread right through before starting my building and decided not to use the timber strips as I could design and print templates for the cardboard that matched the length of each wall so that I could cut bulk amounts of strips before starting. It was supposed to make the job quicker and easier for me. I assumed that two coats of matt varnish would protect the cardboard before using mortar. The cardboard is only a problem in places where either the varnish has not covered it sufficiently or is put under stress during the wiping off stage and is exposed to further wet applications of mortar - then it delaminates and swells etc. This one of the major reasons for switching the technique to a thicker mix and doing much smaller areas at a time. So far tests show that has more promise and reinforces the original thinking that I need to learn to slow down when modelling. I have access to a supplier in NZ who can cut timber strips to any dimension I require so that is still a backup plan.

So, Jacq, giving your thread back to you - I really am looking forward to seeing this one develop past the thinking stage. Knowing the standards achieved in the sawmill, this scene will be a work of art worthy of pride of place in your house for all the visitors to go oooh and aaah!!!!!


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: pwranta193 on March 27, 2011, 07:56:55 PM
Jacq,

Just in case you don't already have enough opinions from folks that have a clue as to what they are talking about (versus myself  ;D) - I agree with the "use the painting as inspiration, but skip trying to copy" - as you will be able to incorporate ideas and new stuff into your own version better...

While I am still a cripple at anything 3D, I don't see why you couldn't get pretty well down the path with a 2D start up... I use MS Visio, just because I had available due to work projects - but it helps to be able to play with the scale of the drawings as you try to get your 1:35th stuff "to standard", and is pretty easy to play with.  I know that you can also import many of them into a 2D (or have someone who actually uses 3D help you do it?).  I'm sure there are open source versions?  I too, still rely on graph paper and pencil drawings - but I'm staring the ripe old age of 51 in the face  ::)

Beautiful painting...


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Chuck Doan on March 28, 2011, 08:52:48 AM
Sounds like a neat project Jacq. I look forward to your adventure and I hope your hand continues to improve.


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Marc988 on March 28, 2011, 01:42:36 PM
Hi Jacq,

good to hear that your hand is improving.

After we talked on ONtraxs in 2010 about the GTM and the 1:35 scale and some great input for 1:35 from Nick, I did some research on 2 different subjects for a possible 1:35 subject of my own. Shortly after, my wife and I decided on another project and decide to build a new house and all the modelling activities were put on hold.
I will send you a PM with some details which, I think, will be usefull for your project !

I surely am looking forward to the development of your project.

Marc B


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on April 10, 2011, 12:51:31 PM
 
   To taste occasionally modelrailroading politics, I attended the annual meeting of the dutch modelrailroad federation.  :-[ Enough to go on my own again for a year.  :D
   After the meeting a tour was arranged through the workshops of the Buurtspoor Museum, a remanant of the local railway network.

   (http://images24.fotki.com/v865/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5344-vi.jpg)   

   (http://images58.fotki.com/v510/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5349-vi.jpg)

   (http://images34.fotki.com/v1126/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5351-vi.jpg)

    the locomotive, a former E 3/3 of the swiss railways

    (http://images116.fotki.com/v699/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5377-vi.jpg)

    one of the two main lamps on the pufferbeam (electric)

    (http://images107.fotki.com/v137/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5378-vi.jpg)
   
    the centre lamp (petroleum) lamp

    (http://images17.fotki.com/v147/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5362-vi.jpg)

    (http://images38.fotki.com/v1218/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5360-vi.jpg)

    (http://images49.fotki.com/v1456/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5359-vi.jpg)

    a unique restauration, this is the last and only remaining car of it's class.

    (http://images22.fotki.com/v752/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5355-vi.jpg)

    a german T3

    (http://images27.fotki.com/v983/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5369-vi.jpg)

    a dutch shunting critter

    (http://images33.fotki.com/v1071/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5373-vi.jpg)

    a manual point lever

    (http://images114.fotki.com/v634/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5375-vi.jpg)

    a small telegraph pole work train

    (http://images31.fotki.com/v1096/photos/7/1437817/9652532/DSC_5368-vi.jpg)

    the stations hand luggage car

    after the meeting was finished, I went to the Oostendorper watermill to get detail information on fachwerk construction and waterwheels for my 1:35 project.


    (http://images57.fotki.com/v512/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5398-vi.jpg)

    (http://images107.fotki.com/v84/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5392-vi.jpg)

    (http://images43.fotki.com/v1321/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5393-vi.jpg)

    (http://images36.fotki.com/v1202/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5394-vi.jpg)

    (http://images21.fotki.com/v843/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5410-vi.jpg)

    (http://images12.fotki.com/v197/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5381-vi.jpg)

    (http://images116.fotki.com/v108/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5407-vi.jpg)

    (http://images36.fotki.com/v1180/photos/7/1437817/9652712/DSC_5402-vi.jpg)


    These details will be used to construct the erftmuehle.

     Jacq

   


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 10, 2011, 02:01:20 PM
Very interesting pics, Jacq! Thanks for posting them.

I'm always fascinated/amused by the difference in style between US and European locos.

On that brick building, what is the purpose of the timbers in the walls? Seems like they would be a weak spot.



Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Frederic Testard on April 10, 2011, 02:32:03 PM
Ray, you may want to read this wikipedia page about this style of building : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_framing


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: fspg2 on April 10, 2011, 03:19:52 PM
Jacq,

I remember a thread of an exhibition (http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hgue.de/bilder/fde/DreiM/p5081401.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.kostenloses-forum.com/board/viewtopic.php%3Fnxu%3D01642644nx1878%26t%3D3231%26view%3Dnext&usg=__CtlfCy9qzGP799aW3yu6oY34K1I=&h=525&w=700&sz=125&hl=de&start=5&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=-liKXGw8Bl8bZM:&tbnh=105&tbnw=140&prev=/images%3Fq%3DP5081401.jpg%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DN%26tbm%3Disch&ei=eg6iTYLtL5Dw4Aa117i5CA). The Dutch modelbuilder Jacq Damen showed the following scene.


(http://www.hgue.de/bilder/fde/DreiM/p5081401.jpg)

Maybe it can inspire you a little!

Here (http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://eisenbahn-amateure.ch/germanrail/Lahnstein2008/jacq126.JPG&imgrefurl=http://germanrail.8.forumer.com/a/lahnsteiner-modellbahntage-2008_post2650.html&usg=__AhDbcJfPHPAHJ0iMJYwknNPQ0ug=&h=480&w=640&sz=181&hl=de&start=64&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=e3aeVQnNZFOJvM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=137&prev=/images%3Fq%3DDreim%25C3%25BChlentalbahn%2Bvon%2BJacq%2BDamen%26start%3D63%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DN%26ndsp%3D21%26tbm%3Disch&ei=6hGiTfG-K9CC4QaMn4WZAw)  are some more pictures from this layout.
Do you know this provider (http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=de&sl=de&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.miniaturziegel.de%2FZiegel.xhtml) of real stones in 1:32.

Furthermore, a speedy recovery for your hand!

Frithjof


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on April 10, 2011, 03:20:36 PM
   Ray,

   the timbers carry the main structure supporting the roof AND the 2 mechanismen in the smaller building to grind the wheat and  in the second building support everything to turn an oilpress. The bricks are a fill in material between the timbers. This mill was built in 1544 as a replacement for an earlier washed away mill downstream. In 1566 the 80 year war started in which The Netherlands won their independence from Spain and the mill has been ransacked several times. In 1634 the mill was built up again and used till the beginning of the 20th century, when one of the waterwheels was destroyed. In 1931 the mill was used again but a large renovation was necessary as water had eroded the foundations and found it's way under the mill.
 In 1987/1988 the mill was restored to it's original state from 1544. The mill is in full working order and operates between beginning of April till end of October every wednesday and saturday.
 Every second saturday oil is stamped.

  Jacq


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Ronald on April 10, 2011, 03:26:34 PM
Jacq,

I remember a thread of an exhibition (http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hgue.de/bilder/fde/DreiM/p5081401.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.kostenloses-forum.com/board/viewtopic.php%3Fnxu%3D01642644nx1878%26t%3D3231%26view%3Dnext&usg=__CtlfCy9qzGP799aW3yu6oY34K1I=&h=525&w=700&sz=125&hl=de&start=5&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=-liKXGw8Bl8bZM:&tbnh=105&tbnw=140&prev=/images%3Fq%3DP5081401.jpg%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DN%26tbm%3Disch&ei=eg6iTYLtL5Dw4Aa117i5CA). The Dutch modelbuilder Jacq Damen showed the following scene.

Maybe it can inspire you a little!

Frithjof


Frithjof, the starter of this topic (Jacq01) and the Jacq Damen you mentioned in your message are the same ........... ;D ;)


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: fspg2 on April 10, 2011, 03:36:27 PM
oh, :-[ .... thanks for the info Ronald!

Frithjof


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: jacq01 on April 10, 2011, 03:39:02 PM
 Frithjof,

  
Quote
Maybe it can inspire you a little!
 memories, memories.  

  Building the 3 mills in H0 was a challenge in concept and use of materials. I hope the adventure in 1:35 will give me as much pleasure and challenges as the H0 layout did.
  

   I have now sketches for 3 concepts.
   The old HP 5470C scanner cannot be used with my 64x laptop. I have to rig the scanner up with the old 32x laptop to be able to show the sketches.

  Jacq

  


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Ronald on April 10, 2011, 03:44:04 PM
oh, :-[ .... thanks for the info Ronald!

Frithjof

You're welcome! :) ;)


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: shropshire lad on April 10, 2011, 04:13:55 PM
Ray, you may want to read this wikipedia page about this style of building : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_framing


   Frederic,

  That is a pretty concise overview of timber framing and very informative .

  One thing I didn't see there is that just because a building has brickwork between the timberframing doesn't mean that it always has had brickwork there . There are a great number of timberframed buildings around that have brick infill panels that replaced previous panels of wattle and daub . This was either because the original panels decayed and were replaced with brick because it was easier or , I'm less sure I'm right here , that the use of brickwork became more fashionable and owners of buildings who could afford to spend the money changing the original panels would do so with brick .

  Having said that I would say that the panels in Jacq's model may well have had wattle and daub panels originally but I don't think the watermill building in Jacq's photos did . In fact , I find the combination of brickwork  and timberframing in that building quite confusing , in that,  I can't from the photos , deduce what that building looked like originally , or even if it has been changed at all . There is probably a simple explanation , but without a close examination I  can't tell .
Cor , I just made that sound as if I know what I'm talking about ,

 Nick


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: shropshire lad on April 10, 2011, 04:16:40 PM
Jacq,

I remember a thread of an exhibition (http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hgue.de/bilder/fde/DreiM/p5081401.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.kostenloses-forum.com/board/viewtopic.php%3Fnxu%3D01642644nx1878%26t%3D3231%26view%3Dnext&usg=__CtlfCy9qzGP799aW3yu6oY34K1I=&h=525&w=700&sz=125&hl=de&start=5&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=-liKXGw8Bl8bZM:&tbnh=105&tbnw=140&prev=/images%3Fq%3DP5081401.jpg%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DN%26tbm%3Disch&ei=eg6iTYLtL5Dw4Aa117i5CA). The Dutch modelbuilder Jacq Damen showed the following scene.

Maybe it can inspire you a little!

Frithjof


Frithjof, the starter of this topic (Jacq01) and the Jacq Damen you mentioned in your message are the same ........... ;D ;)


  The clue is in the name !


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Frederic Testard on April 10, 2011, 04:18:17 PM
Thanks for the additionnal information, Nick.
I suspect Jacq knows quite well the story of this particular mill and will be able to solve some of the unanswered questions.


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 10, 2011, 04:35:45 PM
Thanks for the info!


Title: Re: Jacq's 1:35 adventure
Post by: Marc988 on April 11, 2011, 01:00:33 PM


    after the meeting was finished, I went to the Oostendorper watermill to get detail information on fachwerk construction and waterwheels for my 1:35 project.


    


Hi Jacq,

did you see the message I send you regarding the water powered sawmill ?

I borrowed (linked) the following pictures from another sites to give an impression;
(http://twentescooter.nl/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/watermolen-singraven-scooter-rijden.jpg)

The building to the left houses sawmill section. At the moment the mill is closed for the public but I am in contact with a representative.

(http://www.nlnatuur.nl/Album/5-Overigen/Molens%20en%20Boerderijen/slides/Watermolen,%20landgoed%20Singrave.jpg)

 

A small movie with some footage of the insides you will find here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAMdZrWMbi4
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAMdZrWMbi4)

Regards,
Marc