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General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: finescalerr on November 30, 2010, 09:31:28 PM



Title: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on November 30, 2010, 09:31:28 PM
Here's the first shot. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on November 30, 2010, 09:34:37 PM
And here's the second.

Please note that, following Marc's stern directive, I tried to put the structure in some kind of context although it actually will be on a dock, part of a diorama of three building flats. It will abut the left-hand wall of the third building and has only two sides.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: JESTER on November 30, 2010, 09:46:01 PM
Very nice!


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Malachi Constant on November 30, 2010, 10:16:48 PM
OMG yer building something!  ;D

Shed looks real good ... see some bothersome parting/joint lines (vertical) on the steel drum ... (I KNOW that's not the focal point here, I'm just saying)

>>>> More info on the corrugated roofing please!

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on November 30, 2010, 11:12:36 PM
Hey, Dallas, I built the shed, not the el cheapo cast drum! One more like that and I'll send you to the corner!

Construction details later. This was a dress rehearsal for the much larger structures I still must build.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Mobilgas on December 01, 2010, 12:03:28 AM
          ;) Satisfactory         Craig


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: artizen on December 01, 2010, 12:12:43 AM
I agree - very satisfactory!  ;D


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on December 01, 2010, 04:33:33 AM
Well done. This card modelling is convincing.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Philip Smith on December 01, 2010, 04:52:11 AM
Finally something in 1/48th! 8)  I like the looks of everything except your rafters design looks unprototypical. Shouldn't they be running the other way, especially if butted to another wall?

just a thought....

Philip


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Chuck Doan on December 01, 2010, 09:04:44 AM
I think it looks good too!


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: lab-dad on December 01, 2010, 10:26:38 AM
Good start, but something bothers me about the paint.
It is too uniform may be? Wouldn't the battens be more worn than the boards?

-Marty


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 01, 2010, 01:42:49 PM
Can't please everyone, guys. Whatever it's imperfections, it is complete.

The sub-roof consists of individual boards running down from the peak. They rest on the horizontal rafters. This thing wasn't designed by an architect or an engineer; it's a handyman's add-on. And, structurally, it works; check your reference photos for examples of similar sheds.

Yes, it's paper. 100-percent. Not a molecule of wood, metal, or plastic. Lanaquarelle cold press paper provides the wood-like texture. Under magnification it is almost identical to basswood. I laminated the main board veneer to 4-ply Strathmore Bristol plate with 3M double-sided carpet tape. Similarly, I created my own peel-and-stick battens from Lanaquarelle with a backing of carpet tape. The scale thickness is dead on.

The roofing material is matte inkjet paper with my "rusty metal" artwork. I ran it through a corrugating tool and weathered it with a Cool Gray Chartpak marker. I touched the Strathmore 4 ply rafter ends and some areas of siding at the bottom of the shed with tiny drops of SilverWood stain; the rest of the grime is powdered artist's pastel chalk.

I have had almost no modeling (or music) time during this break between books; my father has been sick and I've been taking care of him for about a third of each day. The time I saved on painting, staining, chipping, distressing, sanding, filing, and gluing made it possible to completely scratchbuild the shed (a building flat with only two finished sides) in a mere two weeks!

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Don Railton on December 01, 2010, 08:42:46 PM
Russ - It looks good. What corrugating tool did you use for the roof?  The tools I've used made ribs too large for 1/32 let alone 1/48.  Your roof fits the scale nicely.

Don


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 01, 2010, 09:48:17 PM
My friend (and fellow Terrapin modeler), Ted Edgell, appropriated a beautifully custom machined roller from work. They had used it for something or other and were going to toss it. Ted noticed the ribs were virtually dead on for 1:48, asked for it, and took it home. When we need it, Ted brings it to a meet and we roll our foil or, in my case, paper through it.

Marc figured out a good design for a 1:48 press, by the way, and may have posted something about either his own idea or one he found online someplace on this forum. I found a PDF showing how to make a press and if any of you guys needs it, send me a personal e-mail and I'll send you a copy.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: JohnP on December 01, 2010, 10:01:44 PM
Sorry about your father Russ. Nice that you have the gumption to care for him.

The shed looks good. Certainly layout quality and diorama quality with more context. I think we are too used to seeing all the 1:32 and 1:24 stuff. 1:48 is small on this forum these days. One can examine and judge a project, or one can absorb the intent and essence and get more out of it. This shed is well proportioned and easy to comprehend.

This comes at a nice time. I was just before this looking for a 1:48 structure kit to assemble over the longish holiday vaca I have coming. Didn't find much, my eyes are still in pain from some of it. So me thinks I will go shopping at Michaels and experiment with card. Plus, your quick finishing methods would work better for me. Thanks.

What is "Lanaquarelle"?

John


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: gin sot on December 02, 2010, 01:50:34 PM
Quote
What is "Lanaquarelle"?

It's a higher-end watercolor paper, you can get it at the art supply store.  Watercolor paper comes in a wide variety of weights and surface textures.  The Arches brand is my favorite for watercolor painting, but I haven't ever used it for modeling.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 02, 2010, 03:50:49 PM
A word about cardstock and modeling: If you use it as a structural material you need something like 4- or 5-ply Strathmore Bristol Plate (available from art stores but not Michaels). If you use paper as a veneer, the only things you need to consider are texture and durability.

When I built my boxcar, the card veneer I used was pretty durable and I protected it further with an application of Grumbacher varnish -- the stuff they use for protecting a painting. I also shot it with Dullcote. But the card I used was too smooth for the artwork I printed on it. At certain angles, light reflects off the scribed, smooth sides even after I applied a flat finish. It somewhat spoils the effect of the distressed paint artwork.

Other papers might have too coarse a texture or might be too soft and delicate to work with. Matte finish photo inkjet papers, for example, are much too delicate to use for modeling. And most matte papers, including Strathmore Bristol Plate, have too much reflectivity for any but a reasonably well kept finish.

The Lanaquarrelle cold press stuff I discovered has an ideal texture for weathered wood, brick, and similar materials. It is a little on the soft side but still pretty durable. It takes scribing well. And it is the best semi-soft paper for running through an inkjet printer; I have tried about a dozen others. It would have been preferable for my boxcar project and for some other things I have built. But you must use it as a veneer. It is not a good structural material.

The final thing I have learned about all this is about the 3-D aspect of a veneer. The texture of any scribed card, just as scribed sheet wood or styrene, is often too "perfect". Individual boards generally create a nicer texture because some stand slightly above (or below) the surface. It's just like with stripwood.

Bottom line: The main advantage of card is the ability to print artwork on it. (Or maybe you can get a better stained or painted finish on it than you can on some other material but that's not why I use it.) For me, the printed results seem to surpass what I have done with paint and they are infinitely repeatable -- no hit and miss. That's a big deal to some of us and something that makes others of us turn up our nose.

Since I want to achieve contest quality with a minimum of work and since I tend to throw out a lot of what I do and start over, printed paper works for me. My mental skills are better than my manual skills and I can photograph better than I can paint.

Before some of you seize upon the term "contest quality" and dismiss my efforts as beneath that standard, let me caution you. My models won't win. I'll never beat some of you guys for a ribbon. But my models will be competitive. The differences between your finish and mine won't be immediately obvious and the finish of my models will surpass the majority of what appears in many contest rooms.

I'll be in the running...and that is my goal. I can achieve it in much less time now that I have refined my Photoshop artwork and have a good photo printer.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: JohnP on December 02, 2010, 08:40:21 PM
Thank you Russ for your answers and comments. It will be nice simply to tray another material beyond styrene and wood.

May I ask what you use to bond laminated layers? A spray adhesive?

Thanks, John


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 03, 2010, 03:40:47 AM
I mostly use 3M Super 77 adhesive spray. It's excellent and should last decades.

After reading about Troels Kirk's models I bought some 3M two sided indoor carpet tape. Presumably it will outlast me ... but who knows? It's pretty handy to use and grabs right NOW, so it's unforgiving -- more so than the 3M peel-and-stick Crystal River uses. On the other hand, it lets me do some stuff with trim and custom shapes that would be more awkward with glue.

For those of you who think I'm nuts for working with paper, the carpet tape and Super 77 spray still might be good for your arsenals.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: artizen on December 03, 2010, 06:13:54 AM
Troels gave up using the double sided carpet tape because it let go after a while. I used it myself (May 2009) after reading his thread and so far most of it is still holding on firm. Where it has let go, it appears to be either damaged or has been repositioned during construction, thereby reducing the stickability of the tape due to dust or fingerprints. I agree, it is sometimes much better to use industrial strength adhesive tape than glue as the two parts are instantly bonded, dry and ready for you to move on. I absolutely detest CA for example and I have a love/hate relationship with it, constantly counting my fingers to see if any are stuck together etc. I have a real respect for it after suffering badly from the fumes one night after a long and frustrating session building something in styrene and using CA. I now much prefer PVA for card (or tape) and UHU Super for styrene as that is a gel and dries much more slowly. Even a child's glue stick is surprisingly good if used in huge quantities! and rollered down flat. Much like carpet tape, which needs to be very well burnished before applying the second piece of cardboard (ie before removing the backing tape) glue stick works well if you burnish heavily (in my case to remove the lumps).


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 03, 2010, 03:26:33 PM
Regarding carpet tape vs. industrial grade: If the industrial grade film that 3M sells kit manufacturers for peel-and-stick construction were available in sizes and quantities I could use, I'd buy it in a split second. Does anybody know if it is available and where? Two inch wide rolls would be about right for our use. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: artizen on December 03, 2010, 05:12:21 PM
I purchased my carpet tape from a trade supply industrial warehouse specialising in glues and adhesives to the building trade. Because I am a registered business here in Brisbane, I was allowed to purchase small quantities. I could never find the product in the usual places which is why I was trying the trade supply places. The tape came with a guarantee that it would never let go if applied correctly and that appears to be the case. The brand name was unknown to me - it appeared to be a Chinese import - certainly not 3M or anything recognisable.

I kept the label in case I needed more (and if if worked!). The brand name is Stylus Tapes International 722 flooring tape. For fixing lino, carpet, underlay and felt to a hard surface. The size was 50mm wide x 50m length. The label has an Australian address on it but almost certainly sourced from China.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: DaKra on December 03, 2010, 05:22:49 PM
I got my roll of 3m transfer tape here

http://store.foslimited.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=3M465

I mostly use this for non-model things like fixing name plates to bases, generally not a fan of peel and stick parts. 

Dave


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on December 03, 2010, 08:19:43 PM
Thanks, Ian and Dave.

From the website description I can't really tell whether the FOS tape is what we want. Do you happen to know any more about it, Dave?

Some people object to peel-and-stick but I find that it is very useful for certain applications. What I like about the stuff Crystal River uses is that I can very gently tack down one corner and, if necessary, reposition that before I get an exact fit and press everything in place. I can't do that with carpet tape. Also, Tom at Crystal River swears his 3M stuff is permanent but says some peel-and-stick adhesives other guys use eventually let go. The problem is that Tom's stuff appears to be unavailable in the sizes and quantities hobbyists need.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: JohnP on December 03, 2010, 09:07:38 PM
I have been using Super 77 at work and play for years. It is a might sticky stuff. My familiarity with it will be helpful.

I guess I have to just obtain the materials and give it a whirl. Something like the farm scene below might be a nice effort once I get used to paper.

Thanks to all,

John


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: eTraxx on December 04, 2010, 06:54:07 AM
Many of the experts at bonding layers of paper/cardstock over at Papermodelers.com use 3M Super 77. These guys/gals live and breath paper modeling. To my mind this backs up John's suggestion for Super 77.

Take some time to read through their 'Tips and Tricks' section on Adhesives. Lots of good info there.
http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/tips-tricks/1417-what-adhesives-do-you-use.html


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: gin sot on December 04, 2010, 01:37:58 PM
I have used Super 77 to make self-adhesive foil following a technique I read about in Finescale Modeler.  It worked fairly well, provided no dust got on the sticky side while it was drying, but I later moved on to the Microscale foil adhesive since it was simpler and less messy.



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 01, 2011, 11:37:53 PM
I have been stealing a few minutes here and there for modeling. Over the past four days I finally found a little time to work on the main structure the lean-to abuts. Here is the plan. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 01, 2011, 11:43:33 PM
I built the walls board by board from Lanaquarelle cold press on 4 ply Strathmore Bristol Plate subwalls, braced everything with wood and styrene (plastic works better), and then set to work on the front wall. In case you have forgotten or perhaps I never mentioned, this structure is a "flat", only about three inches deep. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 01, 2011, 11:48:09 PM
So that is the back and sides. And here is the right side (with a cutaway opening for a covered porch) viewed from the rear and the components (side, back, and ceiling) for what will assemble into the recessed front wall. Again, construction of each component is board by board -- simple planks, nothing fancy. I'm thinking that this thing might be a structure where they build or repair small boats. It will sit on or next to a pier. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 01, 2011, 11:50:35 PM
Finally, the front wall, still under construction. It needs additional weathering, windows, doors, and trim. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Junior on January 02, 2011, 04:56:29 AM
That looks like a very nice structure Russ and Happy New Year!

Anders ;D


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Malachi Constant on January 02, 2011, 09:44:37 PM
Nice start!  Look forward to more ...

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 18, 2011, 08:16:44 PM
Here is the progress on the rest of the structure the lean-to leans to. 1:48 scale. All paper. 100% scratchbuilt. No paint. ... And the first shot:

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 18, 2011, 08:18:08 PM
Here is the second:


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 18, 2011, 08:19:01 PM
Now the third:


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 18, 2011, 08:19:34 PM
And here's the final photo:


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: TRAINS1941 on January 18, 2011, 08:26:25 PM
Hey Russ that looks pretty dam good to me.  It might even make the book Westlake Publishing puts out ;).

Jerry


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Ray Dunakin on January 18, 2011, 11:34:38 PM
Satisfactory.   ;)



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Junior on January 19, 2011, 06:44:06 AM
Russ, that looks VERY good.  Great progress.

Anders ;D


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: mabloodhound on January 19, 2011, 09:51:22 AM
Russ,
Looks good and nice to see you building.   On the double sided tape, the group on Railroad-Line have used the 3M 465 with great results.   Karl Scholz and the late Mike Chambers and many others have used this since 2006 with great results.

I started my card stock model last night to try the Lanaquarelle you sent me.   Prompted by your work and Troels Kirk's designs and hope it will be up to par.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Ken Hamilton on January 19, 2011, 10:51:05 AM
Very effective, Russ.
It sure doesn't look like paper in the photos. 
Also, how'd you do the windows? They look too precise to have been hand-cut.
Unless your hands are far more steady than any of us could have imagined......(http://bestsmileys.com/movingeyes/3.gif)


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 19, 2011, 02:21:25 PM
The windows are laser cut Strathmore Bristol Plate from my own CAD drawings, Ken.

Surprisingly, the printed paper doesn't look like paper in person, either, even under magnification. It looks like weathered, painted wood. The texture makes the difference.

Last year I discovered Lanaquarelle 180 gram cold press paper I had printed and distressed was indistinguishable under magnification from stained, distressed basswood. I showed the results to a group of picky Terrapin modelers and none could detect a difference. That was the Great Epiphany.

I use a different paper, with a velvety sheen, for newer looking boards and trim.

So color is one-half the battle and texture the other. If you mess up on either you destroy the effect.

Russ



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: DaKra on January 19, 2011, 02:49:09 PM
I like it a lot, too.  You were successful in another element to making it believable-- there is no noticable repitition to the graphic.   That can also destroy the effect.   

Dave


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on January 19, 2011, 03:54:06 PM
Russ, I find this wall very convincing.
You might be interested by this picture of a ship I am currently building in O scale. The hull is covered with canson paper, the wheelhouse with wood. While there is a difference since I used distressed wood, I think that on the picture the two sidings don't appear very different.

(http://img53.xooimage.com/files/9/2/d/davecorner326-24ab5c7.jpg)


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: JohnP on January 19, 2011, 06:40:37 PM
I spoke with a pretty good fellow modeler last night. He has been trying cardstock/paper for buildings. He said he modified a cricut (http://www.cricut.com/) crafty cutter thingy so it is more accurate.  Then he found a software to convert CAD to cricut language. He cuts out window parts and sandwiches the clear in between. I'll get to see the rig and results soon. Sounds neat.

John


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: onl26 on January 19, 2011, 08:24:51 PM
Very impressive Russ! Just as you said just abut anything can be modeled with paper.

Kevin


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 20, 2011, 03:00:11 AM
Frederic, your boat looks terrific. Please post more about it in the Maritime section. I would like to read all about it and see more photos.

By the way, I spoke to a friend of yours yesterday, Jan Kok, who had some very nice compliments about your modeling.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on January 20, 2011, 06:35:01 PM
Thanks Russ. I think I'll post a topic about the building of the diorama which this ship will be a part of. I'll try to find the best section.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 20, 2011, 08:56:02 PM
I am very partial to waterfront dioramas. If you have not promised it to someone else, is this something you would want me publish? -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on January 21, 2011, 12:38:29 AM
The only person I remember I have promised it to is you, Russ.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on January 21, 2011, 03:00:40 AM
Good, because if that boat is any indication, you are building one heck of a diorama! -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on January 31, 2011, 05:13:38 PM
Russ, since of the main aspects of this topic is paper modelling, I thought I would share this half wall made with canson paper strips.

(http://img54.xooimage.com/files/7/6/b/building0055-251a7de.jpg)

The paper was glued still white. Then I washed it with my water and india ink solution, followed with two somewhat randomly applied washes : burnt umber then white, reworked a few details with a bit of water and ink again, and finally used a pin and a thin brush to add hints of nails and rust (yellow oxyde oil paint).


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on February 01, 2011, 02:53:40 AM
Nobody would know it is paper from looking at that photo. Very nice artwork. -- Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: MT Hopper on February 01, 2011, 01:13:04 PM
I spoke with a pretty good fellow modeler last night. He has been trying cardstock/paper for buildings. He said he modified a cricut (http://www.cricut.com/) crafty cutter thingy so it is more accurate.  Then he found a software to convert CAD to cricut language. He cuts out window parts and sandwiches the clear in between. I'll get to see the rig and results soon. Sounds neat.

John
Do you think you could get him to write up and photo his mod work on the cricut and tell us about the software?
Robocraft makes a pc controllable paper cutter, but, here in the Heart of the Continent, cricut at Michaels is the only thing available.
Cheers
Will MMii


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: clevermod01 on February 01, 2011, 06:06:52 PM
I've been looking at the Cricit as well. I was wondering about the resolution of the cuts. can you post any samples or more information.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 04, 2011, 01:41:33 PM
The basic structure finally is complete. And why has it taken two months to finish? I was waiting for roofing that never arrived. So before I post the images of the structure, let's talk about shingles:

I use Crystal River laser cut wood shingles on my structures because they look wonderful. But Crystal River's owner, Tom Fitzgerald, asked me to develop artwork for paper shingles. I spent a couple of weeks or more tweaking various iterations and building up dozens of small samples, printed the "winner" on a variety of papers, and sent them to Tom. He procrastinated for a couple of weeks before laser cutting his favorite sheet and laying up a sample roof. He sent me a photo. My composite photo below shows both the wood and printed card roofing.

Tom promised to send laser cut sheets of my card roofing so I could decide what I preferred. (It would have been nice to have a 100-percent scratchbuilt model.) I waited three weeks for roofing that never arrived, finally gave up, used wood, and completed the model. I still have no samples from Tom.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 04, 2011, 01:52:29 PM
And now, finally, the structure itself. It is all inkjet printed card except for the wood decking and shingles. It looks rather barren without details or context but that must wait for installation on the eventual diorama. Don't expect photos of that anytime soon; I first must build a few more structures.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 04, 2011, 01:55:23 PM
I have mentioned earlier that this model is a "flat" so it has abbreviated sides and no back. Other information about the materials appears earlier in the thread.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 04, 2011, 02:01:23 PM
Since the images are snapshots and nothing I would publish, I suppose I also should include the shot below. It shows the new structure next to a couple of others that ultimately will appear on the diorama. They are sitting on an unfinished HO standard gauge terminal I started about twenty years ago and probably could complete in about a week if I had any incentive. At the moment it serves a more practical purpose as a storage shelf.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: jacq01 on April 04, 2011, 03:12:41 PM

     Uncle Russ would say:   Satisfactory   ;D ;D ;D ;D

   amazingly wel done. And a very useful thread

   Jacq


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on April 04, 2011, 03:20:46 PM
Certainly proves your argument.

Never having built these type of structures I have no real basis to comment but I do like the fineness of the look, if that makes sense  and I am going to presume that when they are set into a landscape they will also have the weight of structures ... again I hope you have some understanding of what I am trying to say.

Certainly if I ever have a decent enough printer I'm going to try this method.

Sue you will have noticed but on this Shorpy photo posted earlier there is a building very similar to yours in the middle of the near foreground - have a look at in full size. The outhouse is a neat little building both in location and the way it is built into the fencing/boundaries

http://www.shorpy.com/node/10190

 


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Chuck Doan on April 04, 2011, 03:25:32 PM
I think it came out nice. Very crisp and clean construction.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Malachi Constant on April 04, 2011, 03:38:00 PM
Quite satisfactory.  "Finishes" and assembly look great.  Windows nice and delicate.

One thing stands out a bit ... or actually doesn't seem to stand out.  The freight doors look rather "flat" to me.  The front entry door has nice relief and/or printed shadows ... but the freight door simply looks like printed paper to me and seems like a "give away".  Of course, with everything in a scene and details out front, etc, that could just go away ...

Not related to materials or actual construction ... but also find the overall design and proportions of the buildings very pleasing.  -- Dallas


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Mr Potato Head on April 04, 2011, 04:11:47 PM
I think with more embellishments that it would look credible and work in any scene. I like it!
Gil


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: eTraxx on April 04, 2011, 04:18:00 PM
<snip>
... The outhouse is a neat little building both in location and the way it is built into the fencing/boundaries

http://www.shorpy.com/node/10190
Seems to me that the water table under that outhouse would be at the level of the river ... which would make things .. interesting.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: marc_reusser on April 04, 2011, 04:44:33 PM
Umm...well overall I think it looks "most satisfactory" ;D....but we need to talk about those laser cut wood shingles :-X ....and about the direction of the corrugated on the small awning over the door on the larger structure  ???.

Marc


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Chuck Doan on April 04, 2011, 04:47:16 PM
Hmm. I missed that. But to be fair, I once rented a house with plastic corrugated going that way on a patio cover. It's not wrong, it's....special!


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 04, 2011, 06:04:51 PM
Some details, like the entry door awning, are deliberately "different". After all, it would function, just not elegantly. I often include later add-ons an amateur handyman might have cobbled together from whatever was available because I have so often seen them in photos and in person.

Please comment further on the laser cut wood shingles. On my next structure I could lay up the roof piece by piece. And I have to write a review of Tom's latest shingles for December.

Dallas, I went into the other room and looked a the freight door; I guess you're right. It really is a 3-D, board-by-board fixture but, now that you mention it, some dirt seems to be missing. Better lighting under the overhang might have brought out the third dimension.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Philip Smith on April 04, 2011, 06:22:18 PM
Nice work Russ!

Marc, Roofer musta forgot his tinsnips. 
 8)



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: DaKra on April 04, 2011, 06:29:43 PM
Looks great, the proportions will be fine once its in its position as a partial background flat.   Agree on the freight door, maybe some subtle grubby handprints around the handles will help it.    

I like the little overhang with the corrugations going the "wrong" way.  Seems to me, it would deflect more water over the sides, so less to drip down the collar of your coat as you went in and out the door.    

I like the shingles on the model too, they seem subtle enough to be realistic.  Not a big fan of the exaggerated haphazard shingles that are de regeur for craftsman structures.    I've collected a lot of roof photos from Shorpy, was surprised to see how thin, neatly applied and uniform wood shingles usually were.   I've seen the sloppy shingles on sharecropper's shacks and other impoverished dwellings.

Dave



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Ray Dunakin on April 04, 2011, 10:19:47 PM
Looks great! Hard to believe it's paper.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Frederic Testard on April 05, 2011, 04:44:33 PM
This is really very convincing, Russ.


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: james_coldicott on April 06, 2011, 02:30:29 AM
Russ,

this is looking really good- I like the subtle rain streaking coming from the upper window sills. Little details like that are what make a structure appear to me to be living in the real world.

How do you feel about doing a SBS on your photoshopping techniques? I think the real value of your work is not to prove the viability of commercially printed card structures but the possibility of using personal photographs of real structures to produce scale artwork to print out a model- basic rescaling and 'squaring up' aside I'd be interested to know what adjustment layers you've used to tone down images for a model or where you have used basic textures to create an individual plank or series of planks. Would be interesting to see your source references (photo's?) for texture and how they were translated into your model.

James


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: clevermod01 on April 06, 2011, 06:43:34 AM
Great thread Russ. The results speak volumes. You are a true explorer.
Thom


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: TRAINS1941 on April 06, 2011, 08:55:55 AM
Russ

Nice job.  Doesn't look anything like paper.

Jerry


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: lab-dad on April 06, 2011, 09:42:29 AM
Is that the best you can do?
Gollly snapdragon, you have been messing around with this medium for years!
I wonder if the Gazette would publish an article? It certainly is more than adequate!

In all seriousness it is nice to see you modeling again, wonderful example and inspiration.
The only "real" complaint I have is the shingles also, not sure what to suggest though.
Like others I think the corrugated adds interest and can see it being done (by me!)

-Marty


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 06, 2011, 12:52:42 PM
My dearest young Martin,

Please resume your medication and spend more quality time with your therapist.

Cordially,

Russ

P.S.: Please be more specific about the failings of the shingles. Tom knows they are too thick so he's using thinner wood now. But if the problems go deeper than that, I'd like to find out where they miss the boat. Marc referred to shingle issues, too, but never followed up. How the heck are we supposed to learn if you guys don't teach us?


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: TRAINS1941 on April 06, 2011, 06:49:07 PM
P.S.: Please be more specific about the failings of the shingles. Tom knows they are too thick so he's using thinner wood now. But if the problems go deeper than that, I'd like to find out where they miss the boat. Marc referred to shingle issues, too, but never followed up. How the heck are we supposed to learn if you guys don't teach us?

Now hell I just read Marc reply this afternoon what happen to it????????????

Jerry


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: marc_reusser on April 06, 2011, 10:08:04 PM
Reply!?......what reply!? ??? :-\

M


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Philip Smith on April 06, 2011, 11:03:15 PM
Reply!?......what reply!? ??? :-\

M

Did Russ took ya out to the woodshed after that floggin? :o

ouch!

 :o


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 07, 2011, 02:16:08 AM
Okay, you sharp eyed rascals, Marc and I spoke on the phone yesterday and he asked me to yank his post. On the phone he said staining wood shingles with an India ink and alcohol solution results in an unrealistically translucent rather than a more proper opaque finish. And he found the paper shingles too reminiscent of a "modeled" roof. For a more a "real" roof he suggested I scan some actual shingles or shakes and use that as a starting point for making new paper artwork.

I found three rotting and termite eaten shakes in my woodpile and will scan them forthwith.

Anything else Marc may want to add he will post himself.

(You guys notice everything; what a drag.)

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Philip Smith on April 07, 2011, 06:05:43 AM
Russ,

I don't want to harp but your verticals are lining up incorrectly. This will leak when you have the vertical cracks aligned. This is a crop from your earlier comparison shot. Notice 4 in a row. Nothing underneath to divert the water down.

Philip



Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Malachi Constant on April 07, 2011, 06:17:16 AM
Roof, huh?
Maybe I shoulda said DiMaggio ...


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: W.P. Rayner on April 07, 2011, 07:34:35 AM
Nicely done Russ and an architecturally interesting structure. However, I'm going to be seemingly the odd man out here... it looks texturally flat to my eyes. Perhaps it's just the photos or the lighting in the photos, I'm not sure, but the weathering and texturing all looks too consistent, too precise and lacking in volumetric space and depth. The test samples you were showing earlier didn't give that impression, at least up close, so perhaps it is just the lighting in the photos. Also, as you mention, final detailing is yet to be done. As far as corrugations on the roof going in the "wrong" direction, that's an interesting and humorous detail, but once again, it looks too neat. Only a slip-shod carpenter or a cheap-skate would do something like that, and the assembly seems too clean and precise to enhance that impression.

Ok that's my two cents worth (actually much less given the current state of the economy and pending government shutdown  ;)), so I'll go back to the corner now...

Paul


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 07, 2011, 01:35:25 PM
... And I thought this structure turned out relatively well. Oh, silly moi.

About the shingle spacing, Philip: That is the price we pay for using a commercial product. As I waited for the paper shingles that never arrived I seriously considered laying up the roof shingle by shingle. Had I done that you might have criticized the artwork but not the way the shingles lined up. (Also, had I done that, I would have completed the structure a month earlier.)

I read your earlier post about commercial shingles and their failure to align. I made sure to overlap the end shingles and hoped for the best as each row took shape but, without losing the advantage of laser cut shingles, it was impractical to snip the strip, correct the next shingle, and proceed. Using individual shingles would have been just as fast as that and, as I said, I decided against that.

Finally a thought about any model, music, photo, painting, poem, book, play, movie, or other creation: The creator takes it to whatever limit he considers appropriate and then calls it finished. Once it is on display he discovers that NOTHING, not even a Mozart concerto or a da Vinci Mona Lisa, pleases everyone.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: BKLN on April 07, 2011, 02:04:47 PM
Russ,
I think it is actually the opposite: I think that very often, we are not fully satisfied with our results and that motivates to us to do better next time. The key for me personally, is to find the point when enough is enough. I find that to be incredibly difficult. I have many projects sitting unfinished on the shelf for one simple reason: I know better know. I see errors and I know that it easier to move on than to correct the wrongs.

- But how accurate do we have to be? How fine does finescale have to be? In most cases, we are are storytellers here. We tell a story about a vehicle or structure and were are painting a picture of it.

So if you are happy with the structure, leave it as it is. Your challenge was to refine your paper modeling, I think. Don't forget the bigger picture because of couple of wrong shingles.

Christian


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: W.P. Rayner on April 07, 2011, 08:31:04 PM
Finally a thought about any model, music, photo, painting, poem, book, play, movie, or other creation: The creator takes it to whatever limit he considers appropriate and then calls it finished. Once it is on display he discovers that NOTHING, not even a Mozart concerto or a da Vinci Mona Lisa, pleases everyone.
Russ

It did turn out well Russ and you are absolutely right. It is foolhardy for any individual to think that their creation will please everyone. As long as you are pleased, that's all that really counts. The pleasure it creates for others is a bonus. I offered up my thoughts in the spirit of the Forum and debated with myself for a couple of days on whether to do so. My feeling that friends are better served by being honest and direct with each other eventually won out.

Paul


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: finescalerr on April 08, 2011, 02:53:24 AM
Paul, I genuinely thank you for your comments. I can't learn unless somebody who knows more than I do points out what he considers deficiencies. And I think the other contributors to this forum feel the same way. I simply wanted to make a general comment about art (because many on this forum have taken their hobbies far beyond mere hobbies) and what happens when you present something to an audience.

I had an interesting and possibly related experience with my latest clarinet album. Most people like it or even love it. My former clarinet teacher, a real perfectionist and in some ways a musical genius, wished I had somehow taken it farther. You know, "I like it -- but ...." Still, I am satisfied with the album; it accurately reflects what I initially set out to create (rather than what he had in mind) and, given the obstacles I had to overcome and the way I chose to deal with them, I doubt I could have done it much better.

By reading all the stuff on this forum and listening to you guys and pushing myself I have managed to build each model a little better than the last. Whatever their shortcomings, the models I have posted here have far surpassed the standards I set for myself in the past. And each model exemplifies one or two new things I've learned from you.

I'm not a competitive modeler and I always draw a line beyond which I choose not to pass. But that line keeps moving forward and will until I get too old or until I go (completely) nuts. It is unlikely my models ever will rank among the best on this forum. But they sure are better than they were! And the greatest compliment I expect to receive from you rascals is, "That's a very good model ... except for ...." Yeah. That's a satisfactory compliment.

Russ


Title: Re: 1:48 Structure with Lean-To
Post by: Gordon Ferguson on April 08, 2011, 08:28:11 AM
Russ, completely agree with everything you said and I certainly feels the same ..... hopefully my models get a little better each time, most of the improvements (?) have come from incorporating learning points from here.

The Ultimate aim of course to get a "satisfactory" comment.